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Microscopes

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    Microscopes Microscopes Presentation Transcript

    • Microscopy: The Science of the Microscope
    • The Invention of the Microscope
      • Renaissance invention (Mid 1600s)
      • Credit for invention goes to Anton Van Leeuenhoek
      • Constructed simple curved glass lenses in combination
    • Improving the Microscope
      • Robert Hooke
      • English biologist who discovered cells
      • Increased magnification with improved lenses
    • Modern Compound Light Microscopes
      • Uses 2 lenses in combination to magnify an image
      • Can view objects too small to be seen with unaided eye
      • Object must be thin enough for light to pass through
      • Can view living things
      • Typical magnification 100x to 1000x
      See page 17 of your packet for a detailed discussion of:
      • Parts and their functions
      • Proper use and handling
      • Procedures for making a wet mount
    • Pushing the Limits: Electron Microscopes
      • A light microscope cannot be used to distinguish objects that are smaller than half the wavelength of light
      • Any object with a diameter smaller than 0.275 micrometers will be invisible or, at best, show up as a blur
      • Electrons are speeded up in a vacuum until their wavelength is extremely short, only one hundred-thousandth that of white light.
      • Electron microscopes were developed in the 1930s
    • Electron Microscopes
      • Uses a beam of electron to view the specimen (not light)
      • Specimen viewed must be prepared in a vacuum (no air molecules) therefore living things cannot be viewed using this type of scope
      • Magnifies up to 200,000x magnification
    • Scanning Electron Microscope
    • Scanning Electron Microscope or SEM
      Bounces electrons off the surface of the object
      Produces a 3 dimensional image of the object
    • Red Blood Cells
    • Blood Clot
    • Nerve Cells
    • Tongue with a Taste Bud
    • Sperm on Surface of Human Egg
    • The Split End of a Human Hair
    • Tooth Plaque
    • Transmission Electron Microscope
    • Transmission Electron Microscope
      Electrons pass through the object forming a one dimensional picture
      Allows one to view the inside of an object (ex. internal structure of a cell)
    • filamentous bacteria from the gut of a termite
    • Sperm heads from a stick insect
    • Salmonella Bacteria
    • Stereoscope
      • Allows viewing of macroscopic objects with great detail
      • Does not require light to pass through object
      • Can view living things
      • Typical magnification of 10X to 30X
    • Choosing the Correct Microscope
    • Microscope Lab Skills Review
      Complete the microscope review activities on pages 41 and 43-44.