Planning the Future of Food Creating Food System Plans at the  State, County, City and Neighborhood Level Community Food S...
City Neighborhood County State
Discussion Topic Areas Overview at Each Level Motivation & Benefits The Planning Process Community & Stakeholder Engagemen...
Discussion Topic Areas Overview at Each Level Motivation & Benefits The Planning Process Community & Stakeholder Engagemen...
The Michigan Good Food Charter Kathryn Colasanti ,  C.S. Mott Group for Sustainable Food Systems Contact:   [email_address...
<ul><li>Vision for 2020 </li></ul><ul><li>6 measureable goals </li></ul><ul><li>25 actionable agenda priorities </li></ul>...
Our Vision for Michigan We envision a thriving economy, equity and sustainability for all of Michigan and it’s people thro...
Michigan Goals for 2020 MI institutions source 20% of food from MI MI farmers profitably supply 20% of all MI markets and ...
The Multnomah Food Action Plan Katie Lynd ,  Food Policy Coordinator, Multnomah County Office of   Sustainability Contact:...
The Multnomah Food Action Plan “ By 2025, we envision a thriving regional food system that engages the community in health...
What’s in the Plan? <ul><li>16 Shared Goals  65 Collaborative Community Actions  </li></ul><ul><li>40 Food Citizen Actions...
Benefits to Our Community  <ul><ul><li>Collaboration and partnerships   </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inspire leaders   </li>...
Transforming the Oakland Food System: A Plan for Action Alethea Harper ,  Oakland Food Policy Council Coordinator Contact:...
Transforming the Oakland Food System: A Plan for Action <ul><li>The mission of the Oakland Food Policy Council is to estab...
<ul><li>Challenges: </li></ul><ul><li>Hunger, diet-related disease, violence, economic strife in the Oakland flatlands </l...
Transforming the Oakland Food System: A Plan for Action PROTECT AND EXPAND URBAN AGRICULTURE.  Create zoning definitions a...
Food for Growth: A Community Food System Plan for Buffalo’s West-Side Dr. Samina Raja ,  University at Buffalo, Department...
Food for Growth: A Community Food System Plan for Buffalo’s West Side
<ul><li>SELECTED RECOMMENDATIONS </li></ul><ul><li>Massachusetts Avenue Project </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthen </li></ul><ul...
Food for Growth: A Community Food System Plan for Buffalo’s West Side
Discussion Topic Areas Overview at Each Level Motivation & Benefits The Planning Process Community & Stakeholder Engagemen...
Discussion Topic Areas Overview at Each Level Motivation & Benefits The Planning Process Community & Stakeholder Engagemen...
Discussion Topic Areas Overview at Each Level Motivation & Benefits The Planning Process Community & Stakeholder Engagemen...
Discussion Topic Areas Overview at Each Level Motivation & Benefits The Planning Process Community & Stakeholder Engagemen...
Additional Questions? Contact Us!  Kathryn Colasanti ,  C.S. Mott Group for Sustainable Food Systems Contact:   [email_add...
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  • At Multnomah County, we have been asking the question what is next for our local food system movement ? What is on the frontier for public health? There’s no doubt that Mult Co and PDX region are at the epicenter of a growing national interest in local food that started on May 29, 1973 with the passage of OR Senate Bill 100 that gave Portland one of its best resources – a thriving farmbelt ringing the metro area. Now we have over 20 farmers’ markets, over 65 community-supported agriculture farms, and a plethora of restaurants and grocery stores that feature local food. There is also no doubt that our community is progressive in tackling the social determinants of health, especially the critical role that food and our food system plays in the development of chronic diseases. So the question is: Have we arrived or have we just started? Many of us believe that we have just started. Mult Co has been very active in the past 2 years on local food FPC, County Digs, CROPS, Hope Garden, HB 2763, Health Equity Initiative There are many such efforts underway in this region Ecotrust – Food Hub OFB – Plant a Row Kaiser Permanente – thrive campaign and partnering with farmers New Seasons &amp; Burgerville keeping it local and supporting regional economy PSU – Food Assessment Every organization in this room has been doing terrific work on some piece of our food system
  • We see this as a resource for anyone looking at how to advance local and regional food system development and to support good food And we see this as a tool for starting conversations with all sorts of different stakeholder groups And a rallying point around which everyone who is supportive of the vision can come together In fact we have had all different types of organizations sign the Resolution of Support for the charter, from farmers, to food banks, food distributors and retailers, public health groups, economic development groups, educator associations as well as MDA and MDCH
  • Quote – now we have a plan of our own - strength of Plan is by our community, for our community - we have a shared vision &amp; goals
  • volunteer members, from all sectors of food system Members come from every food system sector: Production Processing Distribution Consumption Waste Management / Resource Recovery And many “working communities” Business (urban and rural) Labor Community Organizations Citizens Health Education Local Governance
  • Oakland struggles with high rates of obesity, poverty, food insecurity, and hunger. There are stark disparities in services and health across different geographic areas of Oakland. When we formulated our recommendations, we were keeping in mind the interlocking components of a healthy food system Also keeping in mind everything we have learned – both through research and community process – about the Oakland food system and the needs/desires of the community Large complex system Chose simple “first steps”
  • If we nurture and support what is beginning to happen, imagine what we could do… FOOD IS A TOOL for us to use to solve many problems. If we solve the food problem, much else will follow. Food is connected to: Health Happiness Jobs Waste Energy We have ten recommended “FIRST STEPS”, and lots more detail to share on each idea. Many of these ideas don’t require a lot of money, but rely instead on changes in regulation, or social marketing campaigns. Much activity currently on: Urban ag EPPP Mobile vending
  • Planning for the Future of Food: Developing Strategic Actions Plans - PowerPoint Presentation

    1. 1. Planning the Future of Food Creating Food System Plans at the State, County, City and Neighborhood Level Community Food Security Coalition Conference - 21 May 2011
    2. 2. City Neighborhood County State
    3. 3. Discussion Topic Areas Overview at Each Level Motivation & Benefits The Planning Process Community & Stakeholder Engagement Implementation
    4. 4. Discussion Topic Areas Overview at Each Level Motivation & Benefits The Planning Process Community & Stakeholder Engagement Implementation
    5. 5. The Michigan Good Food Charter Kathryn Colasanti , C.S. Mott Group for Sustainable Food Systems Contact: [email_address]   Plan: The Michigan Good Food Charter Level: State
    6. 6. <ul><li>Vision for 2020 </li></ul><ul><li>6 measureable goals </li></ul><ul><li>25 actionable agenda priorities </li></ul><ul><li>Resource, tool and rallying point </li></ul>The Michigan Good Food Charter
    7. 7. Our Vision for Michigan We envision a thriving economy, equity and sustainability for all of Michigan and it’s people through a food system rooted in local communities and centered on good food.
    8. 8. Michigan Goals for 2020 MI institutions source 20% of food from MI MI farmers profitably supply 20% of all MI markets and pay fair wages Generate businesses at a rate that enables 20% of MI food to come from MI
    9. 9. The Multnomah Food Action Plan Katie Lynd , Food Policy Coordinator, Multnomah County Office of Sustainability Contact: [email_address] Plan: The Multnomah Food Action Plan Level: County/Regional
    10. 10. The Multnomah Food Action Plan “ By 2025, we envision a thriving regional food system that engages the community in healthy food production, equitable food access, opportunities for collaboration, low environmental impact, living wages and local economic vitality for Multnomah County and its people.”
    11. 11. What’s in the Plan? <ul><li>16 Shared Goals 65 Collaborative Community Actions </li></ul><ul><li>40 Food Citizen Actions </li></ul>
    12. 12. Benefits to Our Community <ul><ul><li>Collaboration and partnerships </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inspire leaders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increase awareness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Support for grants and funds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Promote food system planning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Support the local economy </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. Transforming the Oakland Food System: A Plan for Action Alethea Harper , Oakland Food Policy Council Coordinator Contact: [email_address] Plan: Transforming the Oakland Food System: A Plan for Action Level: City
    14. 14. Transforming the Oakland Food System: A Plan for Action <ul><li>The mission of the Oakland Food Policy Council is to establish an equitable and sustainable food system in Oakland, California. </li></ul><ul><li>Our goals cover the entire food system, and can be summed up in 4 main points: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Healthy food </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Healthy local economy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Healthy environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Healthy choices </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. <ul><li>Challenges: </li></ul><ul><li>Hunger, diet-related disease, violence, economic strife in the Oakland flatlands </li></ul><ul><li>Affluence, security, easy access to good food in the Oakland hills </li></ul><ul><li>Advantages: </li></ul><ul><li>Strong community food movement, supportive local government, well-organized advocacy </li></ul>Transforming the Oakland Food System: A Plan for Action
    16. 16. Transforming the Oakland Food System: A Plan for Action PROTECT AND EXPAND URBAN AGRICULTURE. Create zoning definitions and operating standards for both civic and commercial urban agriculture. ENCOURAGE ACCESSIBLE AND AFFORDABLE FARMERS’ MARKETS. Advocate for the development of zoning regulations to protect and expand farmers’ markets. PROMOTE USE OF FOOD ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS AT FARMERS’ MARKETS. Promote use and acceptance of food assistance program benefits at farmers’ markets. DEVELOP “ENVIRONMENTALLY PREFERABLE PURCHASING PROTOCOLS” (EPPP). Partner with the City of Oakland to develop and implement new RFP standards and language prioritizing and outlining EPPP and nutrition standards for all City contracts. EXPAND COMPOSTING AND FOOD SCRAP RECYCLING. Develop a City-wide waste management contract that expands composting and food scrap recycling.  DEVELOP A “FRESH FOOD FINANCING INITIATIVE”. Develop a “Fresh Food Financing Initiative” (FFFI) that will provide financing, technical assistance, and location assistance to new food enterprises in underserved communities. ENCOURAGE HEALTHY MOBILE VENDING. Expand mobile vending regulations to include additional areas of Oakland and encourage fresh food vending. SYNTHETIC PESTICIDE- AND GMO-PRODUCTION FREE ZONES. Build upon the GMO-ban successes of Marin, Trinity, and Mendocino Counties to inform Alameda County-wide policies on pesticide and GMO-free zones. SCALE UP LOCAL PURCHASING. Scale up purchasing from local producers, and formalize the collaborations between and aggregation of small farmers. STRENGTHEN COMMUNITY-GOVERNMENT LINKS . Build relationships between residents, community leaders, and key government representatives.
    17. 17. Food for Growth: A Community Food System Plan for Buffalo’s West-Side Dr. Samina Raja , University at Buffalo, Department of Urban and Regional Planning Contact: [email_address] Plan: Food for Growth: A Community Food System Plan for Buffalo’s West-Side Level: Neighborhood
    18. 18. Food for Growth: A Community Food System Plan for Buffalo’s West Side
    19. 19. <ul><li>SELECTED RECOMMENDATIONS </li></ul><ul><li>Massachusetts Avenue Project </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthen </li></ul><ul><ul><li>connections with the West Side community </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Educate </li></ul><ul><ul><li>youth about food systems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>residents about nutrition </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Promote </li></ul><ul><ul><li>city and regional awareness of the West Side community’s diverse cultures and ethnic food markets </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Facilitate </li></ul><ul><ul><li>connections between regional farmers and West Side residents </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>connections between West Side food businesses and local food producers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>collaboration amongst various organizations interested in food systems to create a regional food policy council </li></ul></ul><ul><li>City of Buffalo </li></ul><ul><li>Modify </li></ul><ul><li>land use policy to allow land trusts that would protect viable urban community gardens </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize </li></ul><ul><li>public safety as a top priority in neighborhood revitalization to promote a healthy and safe local food system </li></ul><ul><li>Assign </li></ul><ul><li>staff in the Office of Strategic Planning to engage in city-wide food systems planning </li></ul><ul><li>Fund </li></ul><ul><li>food security initiatives in the city </li></ul>Food for Growth: A Community Food System Plan for Buffalo’s West Side
    20. 20. Food for Growth: A Community Food System Plan for Buffalo’s West Side
    21. 21. Discussion Topic Areas Overview at Each Level Motivation & Benefits The Planning Process Community & Stakeholder Engagement Implementation
    22. 22. Discussion Topic Areas Overview at Each Level Motivation & Benefits The Planning Process Community & Stakeholder Engagement Implementation
    23. 23. Discussion Topic Areas Overview at Each Level Motivation & Benefits The Planning Process Community & Stakeholder Engagement Implementation
    24. 24. Discussion Topic Areas Overview at Each Level Motivation & Benefits The Planning Process Community & Stakeholder Engagement Implementation
    25. 25. Additional Questions? Contact Us! Kathryn Colasanti , C.S. Mott Group for Sustainable Food Systems Contact: [email_address]   Plan: The Michigan Good Food Charter Level: State Katie Lynd , Food Policy Coordinator, Multnomah County Office of Sustainability Contact: [email_address] Plan: The Multnomah Food Action Plan Level: County/Regional Alethea Harper , Oakland Food Policy Council Coordinator Contact: [email_address] Plan: Transforming the Oakland Food System: A Plan for Action Level: City Dr. Samina Raja , University at Buffalo, Department of Urban and Regional Planning Contact: sraja@buffalo.edu Plan: Food for Growth: A Community Food System Plan for Buffalo’s West-Side Level: Neighborhood

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