The Minneapolis Healthy Corner Store Program

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  • SarahMinneapolis is the largest city in Hennepin county and in the state of MN and is the county seat. Diverse community and has a high population of East African and SE Asian immigrants.
  • SarahDefinitions: BMI of adults 25-30 for overweight and 30+ obeseAmerican Indian sample size was too small to be significant but we do realize that this is a population that is experiencing health disparities in our community and in terms of chronic diseases such as diabetes Although the communities of color in Minneapolis are a smaller subgroup of the population they experience a much higher rate of obesity and chronic conditions.We are focusing our efforts in the Near North, Northeast and Phillips communities of Minneapolis due to the high concentrations of poverty. North Minneapolis is a food desert with limited access for residents to fresh foods because of few grocery stores/farmers markets or community gardens and high density of unhealthy food outlets such as fast food and corner stores.
  • Seven out of every 10 deaths and 75% of health care costs in the U.S. are due to chronic diseases such as asthma, heart disease and diabetes. Obesity and tobacco use are the leading causes of these preventable, chronic diseases. As a strategy to slow and eventually reverse increasing health care costs, the Minnesota Legislature passed and Gov. Pawlenty signed the 2008 Health Care Reform Act. SHIP is the most comprehensive, cost-saving measure in this legislation.
  • SarahDefinitions: BMI of adults 25-30 for overweight and 30+ obeseAmerican Indian sample size was too small to be significant but we do realize that this is a population that is experiencing health disparities in our community and in terms of chronic diseases such as diabetes Although the communities of color in Minneapolis are a smaller subgroup of the population they experience a much higher rate of obesity and chronic conditions.We are focusing our efforts in the Near North, Northeast and Phillips communities of Minneapolis due to the high concentrations of poverty. North Minneapolis is a food desert with limited access for residents to fresh foods because of few grocery stores/farmers markets or community gardens and high density of unhealthy food outlets such as fast food and corner stores.
  • The Caloric Balance EquationOverweight and obesity result from an energy imbalance. This involves eating too many calories and not getting enough physical activity.  Body weight is the result of genes, metabolism, behavior, environment, culture, and socioeconomic status.  Behavior and environment play a large role causing people to be overweight and obese. These are the greatest areas for prevention and treatment actions.
  • ALISON
  • Could talk about transportation barriers reported by residents
  • Talk about each component, what we have learned, challenges, small wins
  • Define scope Talk about each component, what we have learned, challenges, small wins
  • Define scope Talk about each component, what we have learned, challenges, small wins
  • Rest. Depot…
  • Define scope Talk about each component, what we have learned, challenges, small wins
  • Define scope Talk about each component, what we have learned, challenges, small wins
  • Define scope Talk about each component, what we have learned, challenges, small wins
  • The Minneapolis Healthy Corner Store Program

    1. 1. The Minneapolis Healthy Corner Store Program 14th Annual CFSC: Food Justice Culture Aliyah Ali, MPH October 20, 2010 Creating a Healthier Minneapolis healthy eating + physical activity + smoke-free living
    2. 2. Overview • Minneapolis overview • Obesity Prevention in Minneapolis • Past, Present + Future: The Minneapolis Healthy Corner Store Program
    3. 3. About Minneapolis •Total Population: 382,618 (2000) •Diverse community + large immigrant populations •High rates of health disparities and inequities in our communities of color
    4. 4. Obesity in Minneapolis • Obesity rates are higher: - Among communities of color - In neighborhoods of concentrated poverty • U.S. born blacks and Hispanics/Latinos have highest obesity rates in Minneapolis (SHAPE 2006)
    5. 5. • Part of the 2008 MN Health Care Reform Act • Statewide effort to help residents live longer, better, healthier lives by reducing the burden of chronic illnesses • 2 grants to Minneapolis totaling $2.6 million to reduce obesity and tobacco use • Shift from traditional public health model (program vs policy) Statewide Health Improvement Program (SHIP)
    6. 6. “ It is unreasonable to expect that people will change their behavior easily when so many forces in the environment conspire against such change" Institute of Medicine SHIP: Making the healthy choice the easy choice…
    7. 7. Guiding principles • Focus on communities of need • Affect multiple environments: – Daycares, parks, housing complexes, neighborhoods, schools, worksites, corner stores • Change food environments through following approaches: – practices, availability, affordability, opportunity
    8. 8. Pop Quiz! • According to the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), what percent of adults in Minneapolis consume the recommended # of servings of fruits and vegetables per day? • 12.2% • 30.5% • 48.0% • 86.7%
    9. 9. Pop Quiz! • According to the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), what percent of adults in Minneapolis consume the recommended # of servings of fruits and vegetables per day? • 12.2% • 30.5% • 48.0% • 86.7%
    10. 10. So… what’s the problem? • Lack of access to healthy foods: food deserts • Over-abundance of fast foods & convenience foods • Transportation barriers • Lack of access to physical activity •Affordability of fresh food
    11. 11. Minneapolis: The lay of the land
    12. 12. •Mini Farmers Markets •Healthy vending in theparks •Food Preservation Pilot •Homegrown Minneapolis •Corner Stores Minneapolis past and present
    13. 13. A city-wide initiative to develop recommendations and implement strategies to improve the growth, sales, distribution, and consumption of healthy, locally grown foods. Homegrown Minneapolis
    14. 14. • Electronic Benefit Transfer at Farmers Markets • Community Garden Pilot • Urban Agriculture Topical Plan Homegrown Minneapolis Examples
    15. 15. Taking a closer look at corner stores
    16. 16. We know that they are everywhere…
    17. 17. We also know… •Families often depend on corner stores for grocery needs • Corner stores often have limited healthy food choices •Stores are required to carry minimum variety of healthy foods –Staple Foods Ordinance –2009 WIC changes
    18. 18. Quick history lesson…2008 Minneapolis Staple Foods Ordinance • (c) All grocery stores licensed under this chapter must offer for sale food for home preparation and consumption, on a continuous basis, at least three (3) varieties of qualifying, non-expired or spoiled, food in each of the following four (4) staple food groups, with at least five (5) varieties of perishable food in the first category and at least two (2) varieties of perishable food in all subsequent categories: • (1) Vegetables and/or fruits. • (2) Meat, poultry, fish and/or vegetable proteins. • (3) Bread and/or cereal. • (4) Dairy products and/or substitutes
    19. 19. Staple Foods Ordinance: Unexpected Impetus? • Spearheaded by Licensing Department • Crime prevention strategy – Enhance outer appearance of the store – Staple Foods = Expansion of Customer Base • Food access issue for Health Department
    20. 20. Staple Foods: Enforcement • Enforced by licensing department – Less punitive • Approximately 47 violations – Warning + education • Follow-up inspection – Stores generally in compliance – Compliance super awesome produce • Inspectors recognize support for owners needed
    21. 21. Fast Forward to now-ish… • Cstore Assessments – Conducted by the Health Department • Focused in North Minneapolis – low-income – two full-scale grocery stores – complimented a larger food assessment • Two-phased – Visual assessment – Owner Interview
    22. 22. Visual Assessment (n=35) – 72% not in compliance with produce component of Staple Foods Ordinance – 34% didn’t carry any fresh produce – Most commonly stocked produce include: onions, potatoes, bananas, and lemons/or limes – Produce was often found on the bottom of shelves, refrigeration cases, or beverage coolers
    23. 23. Owner interviews (n=22) – 55% were aware of the Staple Foods Ordinance – Most store owners indicated that customers rarely come in for staple foods such as produce, milk, and eggs – Owners need assistance related to produce marketing and education such as: • Sourcing • In-store displays • Handling • Promotional materials such as signage and recipe cards • Loans/grants to upgrade equipment
    24. 24. • Most prefer fresh produce over canned •40% of Near North residents having access to a vehicle •Residents gave low ratings to availability and quality of fresh produce at corner stores – locations that were reportedly easiest to access •Unimpressed by cstore produce – High cost – Low quality – Lack of freshness •Owners vs resident’s quite the conundrum! (Source: Northside Healthy Eating Project) Resident’s perspective…
    25. 25. Challenges • Staple Foods compliance & enforcement • Lack of support for owners • Connecting residents to the stores
    26. 26. So, what did others do? • Researching corner store programs and resources (other cities, HCSN, market makeovers) • Common healthy corner store program components: – Store assessments – Procuring affordable produce – Signage and pricing – Store improvements (internal and external) – Community engagement
    27. 27. Supports owners in making fresh produce and healthy foods more visible, affordable, and attractive to neighborhood residents. The Minneapolis Healthy Corner Store program
    28. 28. Quick Snapshot… • 10 partner stores have agreed to: – Increase inventory of produce – Display Healthy Corner Store marketing materials within the store – Document and sharing sales records of healthy foods – Attend a produce handling training • Implementation completed December
    29. 29. Benefits to stores • Store assistance entails: – Identifying goals, opportunities, and strategies for increasing sales of healthy foods – Strategically display fresh produce and healthy foods – Displaying in-store promotional materials highlighting healthy foods – Purchasing, pricing and stocking healthy foods affordably – Developing a financial system to help track and monitor sales of healthy foods
    30. 30. Breaking down the process… Produce procurement and sales and handling training Interior and exterior display Marketing and Community Involvement Store recruitment and assessment Finding the right consultant
    31. 31. Where’s Consultant? • Start looking early • Determine what skills you need • Examine non- traditional avenues for partnership
    32. 32. Breaking down the process… Produce procurement and sales and handling training Interior and exterior display Marketing and Community Involvement Finding the right consultant Store recruitment and assessment
    33. 33. Selection of Stores • Criteria for store selection • City Council Approval • Application Developed – Mailed to 90 stores – 15 applicants • 10 stores selected • Memorandum of understanding • Store introductions Minneapolis Healthy Corner Store Program Application T Thank you for your interest in applying for the Minneapolis Healthy Corner Store Program. Please take a moment to fill out this application and return by Tuesday, May 25, 2010, to the MDHFS Healthy Corner Store Program at 250 S 4th Street, Room 510, Minneapolis, MN 55415. The City of Minneapolis Department of Health and Family Support (MDHFS) will select 10 stores to participate in this program. If you have any questions, please contact Aliyah Ali at 612-673- 3861 or aliyah.ali@ci.minneapolis.mn.us. Store Background Store Name: Owner Name (main contact): Address Phone: Email: Please check yes or no for the following questions: Yes No Do you accept EBT (food stamps) Do you accept WIC? Are you willing to increase your stock of fresh fruits and vegetables? Are you willing to increase your stock of whole grain products? Are you willing to increase your stock of low-fat and/or skim dairy products? Are willing to track sales of fresh produce and healthy foods?
    34. 34. Store Assessments • Visual assessment – Healthy foods pricing and placement – Signage – Overall sense of store layout • Owner Interview – Experience carrying produce – Procurement and pricing of produce – Customer demand – Mechanism for owner engagement • Customer Survey
    35. 35. FINDINGS: VISUAL ASSESSMENT PRODUCE DISPLAYSignageProduce Handling
    36. 36. Results: Owner Interview • Produce primarily purchased from other grocery stores • Nominal revenue from healthy foods • Produce display and handling support needed • Immense appreciation coupled with mild skepticism
    37. 37. Breaking down the process… Interior and exterior display Marketing and Community Involvement Finding the right consultant Store recruitment and assessment Produce procurement and sales and handling training
    38. 38. Show me the produce! • Recap: the problem • Sleuthing out opportunities • Ultimate goal = affordable produce for residents • Capitalizing on existing distribution mechanisms vs developing a new system
    39. 39. Show me the produce! • Met with area wholesalers – Received pricing lists – Negotiated additional support • Determined core list of items • Options presented to store owners – Bix Produce selected: better pricing+0 distribution costs = affordable produce
    40. 40. Produce sales and handling training • Training activities – Introduce store owners – Warehouse tour – Handling practices of core items – Pricing produce – Sales tracking • Stores receive $200 credit for first produce purchase
    41. 41. Breaking down the process… Marketing and Community Involvement Finding the right consultant Store recruitment and assessment Produce procurement and sales and handling training Interior and exterior display
    42. 42. Interior/exterior display • Healthy foods display – Display baskets – Visible veggies – Priced produce – 3 core items: grab and go, meal options, combining wic-able items • Signage (indoor and outdoor)
    43. 43. Breaking down the process… Finding the right consultant Store recruitment and assessment Produce procurement and sales and handling training Interior and exterior display Marketing and Community Involvement
    44. 44. Involving the community • Primarily through marketing activities – Store “kick-off” – Taste testing sessions – Food demos – Newspaper advertising • Youth Participation – North Minneapolis YMCA – Roosevelt High School
    45. 45. Breaking down the process… Finding the right consultant Store recruitment and assessment Produce procurement and sales and handling training Interior and exterior display Marketing and Community Involvement
    46. 46. Project evaluation • Not just about # of stores • Tracking sales of produce • Before and after photos to document space allocated to produce
    47. 47. Looking ahead • Incremental approach • Exploring other ideas – Façade improvements – Incorporating locally grown and/or organic produce – Expanding the project • Continuing technical assistance • Project expansion contingent on funding
    48. 48. Revisiting SHIP • Focus on communities of need • Affect multiple environments: – Daycares, parks, housing complexes, neighborhoods, schools, worksites, corner stores • Change food environments through following approaches: – practices, availability, affordability, opportunity
    49. 49. Discussion Questions • Are you working (or plan to work) with corner stores in your community? • Describe what you are doing. • What has been your biggest success? • What has been your biggest challenge?
    50. 50. Acknowledgements • Minnesota Department of Health • Northpoint Health and Wellness Center • Hennepin County through the Blue Cross Blue Shield Healthy Eating MN Grant
    51. 51. Contact Information Aliyah Ali, MPH Minneapolis Statewide Health Improvement Program aliyah.ali@ci.minneapolis.mn.us 612-673-3861 Creating a Healthier Minneapolis healthy eating + physical activity + smoke-free living

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