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Gardening: A Gateway to Good Food
 

Gardening: A Gateway to Good Food

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PDF of power point presentation given during the Gardening: A Gateway to Good Food workshop by Food & Society Fellows, Rose Hayden Smith & Angie Tagtow during the 2009 Community Food Security ...

PDF of power point presentation given during the Gardening: A Gateway to Good Food workshop by Food & Society Fellows, Rose Hayden Smith & Angie Tagtow during the 2009 Community Food Security Conference held in Des Moines, IA

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    Gardening: A Gateway to Good Food Gardening: A Gateway to Good Food Presentation Transcript

    • Community Food Security Coalition Conference, Des Moines, October 2009 GARDENING A Gateway to Good Food Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Rose Hayden-Smith, MAEd, MA, PhD Candidate University of California - Davis Angie Tagtow, MS, RD, LD Environmental Nutrition Solutions Friday, October 16, 2009
    • How can we create a gardening ethos in the US? Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Challenges • Believing that gardens can be productive in a serious and impactful way • Tapping into the potential of gardening to lead to other local food system projects • Tapping into the potential of urban agriculture • Tapping into the potential of local food systems • Tapping into the desire for change • Redefining aspects of the current food system; making it a “Good Food” System Friday, October 16, 2009
    • WWI: “Food Will Win the War” • Prevent civil unrest due to food shortages • Alleviate agricultural labor shortages • Feed mobilizing troops • Feed starving European allies through American food conservation AND increased production efforts • Encourage local production and consumption to reduce the food mile and save trains for transport of food and materiel • Teach youth about the food system and provide them with academic and life skills • Improve nutrition and health • Mobilize and unify Americans around food conservation and production efforts, particularly gardening Friday, October 16, 2009
    • “Good Food” Trivia The term “food mile” originated in: a) 1970s b) 1990s c) World War I d) World War II Friday, October 16, 2009
    • “Good Food” Trivia The term “food mile” originated in: a) 1970s b) 1990s c) World War I d) World War II c) The term “food mile” originated during WWI to encourage local production and consumption to save trains for transport of food and material Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Uncle Sam says GARDEN Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Food is Ammunition (and bread bullets, furrows of freedom, etc.) Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Friday, October 16, 2009
    • WWI Impacts: Liberty/Victory Garden Campaign • Gardening programs WORKED: by 1918, U.S. exporting three times as much grain, meat, sugar as it had before the war. • Estimated value of food products from gardens increased 1/3 in less than a year. • U.S. School Garden Army enrolled urban and suburban youth as “soldier of the soil” • Use of civic space • Understandings of private property Friday, October 16, 2009
    • WWII: Food for Freedom, Plant to Prosper • Improve American health, life via school, home and community gardens • Encourage proper storage and preservation of surplus • Enable families/institutions to save on cost of vegetables to free savings to purchase food • Community gardens for urban dwellers • Encourage local production and consumption to reduce the food mile • Mobilize and unify Americans around food conservation and production efforts, particularly GARDENING (morale, spiritual well-being and recreation) Friday, October 16, 2009
    • “Good Food” Trivia The Vacant Lot Cultivation Association of America is a product of which era? a) 2000s b) 1990s c) World War II d) 1890s Friday, October 16, 2009
    • “Good Food” Trivia The Vacant Lot Cultivation Association of America is a product of which era? a) 2000s b) 1990s c) World War II d) 1890s d) The Vacant Lot Cultivation Association of America was started in the 1890s. Friday, October 16, 2009
    • VP Henry Wallace in his Victory Garden - August 1942 Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Food Commandments Friday, October 16, 2009
    • WWII Impacts • Food production “first line of defense” • 1943 – peak year – 20 million households gardened (est: 3/5ths of Americans) • 40% FFV in 1943 • 4.1 billion jars of food preserved • Gardens as community builders • One of the most successful homefront mobilizations in either war… Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Friday, October 16, 2009
    • “Good Food” Healthy + Green + Fair + Affordable/Accessible Friday, October 16, 2009
    • “Eating is an agricultural act” --Wendell Berry, What are People For? 1990 Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Health of Eaters Photo: Michael Whitehead, Scientists tag sodas as cigarettes of obesity, http://www.theage.com.au/news/world/the-big-evil-of-sweetness/2006/03/10/1141701644562.html Friday, October 16, 2009
    • “Good Food” Trivia How many new products are placed on grocery store shelves each year? a) 100 b) 1,000 c) 20,000 d) 100,000 Friday, October 16, 2009
    • “Good Food” Trivia How many new products are placed on grocery store shelves each year? a) 100 b) 1,000 c) 20,000 d) 100,000 c) In 2006, more than 20,000 new food products were introduced in supermarkets with 54% being candy, gum, snacks and beverages (USDA ERS) Friday, October 16, 2009
    • y science Made b Made by na ture Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Life expectancy is predicted to decline by as much as five years in the next few decades... Finkelstein E, Fiebelkorn, I, Wang, G. National medical spending attributable to overweight and obesity: How much, and who’s paying? Health Affairs. 2003;W3;219–226. Olshansky S, et al. A potential decline in life expectancy in the United States in the 21st Century. NEJM. 2005;352:1138-1145. Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Life expectancy is predicted to decline by as much as five years in the next few decades... Children will have a shorter life expectancy than their parents! Finkelstein E, Fiebelkorn, I, Wang, G. National medical spending attributable to overweight and obesity: How much, and who’s paying? Health Affairs. 2003;W3;219–226. Olshansky S, et al. A potential decline in life expectancy in the United States in the 21st Century. NEJM. 2005;352:1138-1145. Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Public health trends and medical expenditures are a reflection of the viability and stability of the food system Friday, October 16, 2009
    • How do we make healthy food the easiest choice? Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Food choices directly influence our health... Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Food choices directly influence our health... ...and profoundly influence the health of the planet Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Natural Resources, Nutrition & Health Friday, October 16, 2009
    • http://www.blm.gov/nstc/soil/Kids/images/FOOD%20WEB.jpg Friday, October 16, 2009
    • “Proper soil fertility which builds appropriate levels of humus in the soil is the basis of the public health system of the future” --Sir Albert Howard, An Agricultural Testament, 1939 Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Soil to Health Connection • Vital to all life • Nutrient composition of foods • Pharmaceuticals - antibiotics, anti-cancer agents • Climate change and global warming - sequester carbon and decrease greenhouse gases • Resilience - bounce back from natural disasters Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Development Results 1-1 of about 380 for jordan To see all the details that are visible on the screen,use the "Print" link next to the map. creek mall, near West des Moines, IA ©2008 Google - Imagery ©2008 DigitalGlobe, Map data ©2008 NAVTEQ™ -Terms of Use A. Jordan Creek Friday, October 16, 2009 Mall Info Desk
    • Erosion Soil slumping and water cascading Severe gully erosion in a field over the headwall advanced this gully in northeast Iowa (photo courtesy of NRCS) beyond a fence in western Iowa (photo by Tim Kemmis) Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Floods in Iowa June 2008 Photos by Rodney White, Des Moines Register, June 2008 Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Iowa Floods of 2008 Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Friday, October 16, 2009
    • “Good Food” Trivia True or false, it takes 500 years to build one inch of soil. a) True b) False Friday, October 16, 2009
    • “Good Food” Trivia True or false, it takes 500 years to build one inch of soil. a) True b) False a) According to the Soil Science Society of America, it takes 500 years to build one inch of topsoil Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Healthy soil grows healthy food Healthy food nourishes healthy people Healthy people form healthy communities Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Biodiversity Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Biodiversity What would we do without earthworms, bees and birds? Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Living Planet Index ↓31% ↓27% ↓28% Living Planet Index, 2006, available at http://www.panda.org/news_facts/publications/living_planet_report/living_planet_index/index.cfm Friday, October 16, 2009
    • “If all mankind were to disappear, the world would regenerate back to the rich state of equilibrium that existed ten thousand years ago. If insects were to vanish, the environment would collapse into chaos.” ~Biologist E. O.Wilson Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Number of commodities (crop and livestock enterprises) produced for sale on at least 1 percent of all Iowa farms for selected years - 1920 to 2002 1920 (%) 1935 (%) 1945 (%) 1954 (%) 1964 (%) 1978 (%) 1987 (%) 1997 (%) 2002 (%) Horses (95) Cattle (94) Cattle (92) Corn (91) Corn (87) Corn (90) Corn (79) Corn (68) Corn (58) Cattle (95) Horses (93) Chicken (91) Cattle (89) Cattle (81) Soybeans (68) Soybeans (65) Soybeans (62) Soybeans (54) Chicken (95) Chicken (93) Corn (91) Oats (83) Hogs (69) Cattle (60) Cattle (47) Hay (42) Hay (36) Corn (94) Corn (90) Horses (84) Chicken (82) Hay (62) Hay (56) Hay (46) Cattle (42) Cattle (33) Hogs (89) Hogs (93) Hogs (81) Hogs (79) Soybeans (57) Hogs (50) Hogs (35) Hogs (19) Horses (13) Apples (84) Hay (82) Hay (80) Hay (72) Oats (57) Oats (34) Oats (25) Oats (12) Hogs (12) Hay (82) Potatoes (64) Oats (74) Horses (42) Chicken (48) Horses (13) Horses (10) Horses (11) Oats (8) Oats (81) Apples (56) Apples (41) Soybeans (37) Horses (26) Chicken (9) Sheep (8) Sheep (4) Sheep (4) Potatoes (62) Oats (52) Soybeans (40) Potatoes (18) Sheep (17) Sheep (8) Chicken (5) Chicken (2) Chicken (2) Cherries (57) Grapes (28) Grapes (23) Sheep (16) Potatoes (6) Wheat (1) Ducks (1) Goats (1) Goats (1) Wheat (36) Plums (28) Potatoes (23) Ducks (5) Wheat (3) Goats (1) Goats (1) Ducks & Geese (1) Plums (29) Cherries (24) Cherries (20) Apples (5) Sorghum (2) Ducks (1) Wheat (1) Grapes (28) Sheep (21) Peaches (16) Cherries (4) Red Clover (2) Ducks (18) Peaches (16) Sheep (16) Peaches (4) Apples (2) Geese (18) Pears (16) Plums (15) Goats (4) Ducks (2) Strawberry (17) Mules (13) Pears (13) Grapes (3) Goats (2) Pears (17) Ducks (12) Red clover (10) Pears (3) Geese (1) Mules (14) Wheat (12) Mules (6) Plums (3) Sheep (14) Geese (11) Strawberry (6) Wheat (3) Timothy (10) Sorghum (9) Ducks (6) Red clover (3) Peaches (9) Barley (9) Wheat (4) Geese (3) Bees (9) Red clover (9) Timothy (4) Popcorn (2) Barley (9) Strawberry (8) Geese (3) Timothy (2) Raspberry (7) Soybeans (8) Rye (2) Swt potato (2) Turkeys (7) Raspberry (6) Popcorn (2) Sweet corn (1) Wt.melon (6) Bees (5) Sweet corn (2) Turkeys (1) Syrup Sorg (6) Timothy (5) Raspberry (2) Gooseberry (3) Turkeys (4) Bees (2) Sweet corn (2) Rye (2) Sorghum (1) Apricots (2) Popcorn (2) Tomatoes (2) Sweet corn (2) Cabbage (1) Swt clover (1) Popcorn (1) Goats (1) Currants (1) n = 34 n = 33 n = 29 n = 26 n = 17 n = 12 n = 12 n = 10 n = 11 Prepared by Michael Carolan, Sociology Department, Iowa State University. Data is from U.S. Census of Agriculture. Updated to include 2002 data by Andrew Benjamin, Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, Iowa State Univeristy. Data is from the U.S. Census of Agriculture. Notes about this table can be found on the next page. Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Number of commodities (crop and livestock enterprises) produced for sale on at least 1 percent of all Iowa farms for selected years - 1920 to 2002 1920 (%) 1935 (%) 1945 (%) 1954 (%) 1964 (%) 1978 (%) 1987 (%) 1997 (%) 2002 (%) Horses (95) Cattle (94) Cattle (92) Corn (91) Corn (87) Corn (90) Corn (79) Corn (68) Corn (58) Cattle (95) Horses (93) Chicken (91) Cattle (89) Cattle (81) Soybeans (68) Soybeans (65) Soybeans (62) Soybeans (54) Chicken (95) Chicken (93) Corn (91) Oats (83) Hogs (69) Cattle (60) Cattle (47) Hay (42) Hay (36) Corn (94) Corn (90) Horses (84) Chicken (82) Hay (62) Hay (56) Hay (46) Cattle (42) Cattle (33) Hogs (89) Hogs (93) Hogs (81) Hogs (79) Soybeans (57) Hogs (50) Hogs (35) Hogs (19) Horses (13) Apples (84) Hay (82) Hay (80) Hay (72) Oats (57) Oats (34) Oats (25) Oats (12) Hogs (12) Hay (82) Potatoes (64) Oats (74) Horses (42) Chicken (48) Horses (13) Horses (10) Horses (11) Oats (8) Oats (81) Apples (56) Apples (41) Soybeans (37) Horses (26) Chicken (9) Sheep (8) Sheep (4) Sheep (4) Potatoes (62) Oats (52) Soybeans (40) Potatoes (18) Sheep (17) Sheep (8) Chicken (5) Chicken (2) Chicken (2) Cherries (57) Grapes (28) Grapes (23) Sheep (16) Potatoes (6) Wheat (1) Ducks (1) Goats (1) Goats (1) Wheat (36) Plums (28) Potatoes (23) Ducks (5) Wheat (3) Goats (1) Goats (1) Ducks & Geese (1) Plums (29) Cherries (24) Cherries (20) Apples (5) Sorghum (2) Ducks (1) Wheat (1) Grapes (28) Sheep (21) Peaches (16) Cherries (4) Red Clover (2) Ducks (18) Peaches (16) Sheep (16) Peaches (4) Apples (2) Geese (18) Pears (16) Plums (15) Goats (4) Ducks (2) Strawberry (17) Mules (13) Pears (13) Grapes (3) Goats (2) Pears (17) Ducks (12) Red clover (10) Pears (3) Geese (1) Mules (14) Wheat (12) Mules (6) Plums (3) Sheep (14) Geese (11) Strawberry (6) Wheat (3) Timothy (10) Sorghum (9) Ducks (6) Red clover (3) Peaches (9) Barley (9) Wheat (4) Geese (3) Bees (9) Red clover (9) Timothy (4) Popcorn (2) Barley (9) Strawberry (8) Geese (3) Timothy (2) Raspberry (7) Soybeans (8) Rye (2) Swt potato (2) Turkeys (7) Raspberry (6) Popcorn (2) Sweet corn (1) Wt.melon (6) Bees (5) Sweet corn (2) Turkeys (1) Syrup Sorg (6) Timothy (5) Raspberry (2) Gooseberry (3) Turkeys (4) Bees (2) Sweet corn (2) Rye (2) Sorghum (1) Apricots (2) Popcorn (2) Tomatoes (2) Sweet corn (2) Cabbage (1) Swt clover (1) Popcorn (1) Goats (1) Currants (1) n = 34 n = 33 n = 29 n = 26 n = 17 n = 12 n = 12 n = 10 n = 11 Prepared by Michael Carolan, Sociology Department, Iowa State University. Data is from U.S. Census of Agriculture. Updated to include 2002 data by Andrew Benjamin, Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, Iowa State Univeristy. Data is from the U.S. Census of Agriculture. Notes about this table can be found on the next page. Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Number of commodities (crop and livestock enterprises) produced for sale on at least 1 percent of all Iowa farms for selected years - 1920 to 2002 1920 (%) 1935 (%) 1945 (%) 1954 (%) 1964 (%) 1978 (%) 1987 (%) 1997 (%) 2002 (%) Horses (95) Cattle (94) Cattle (92) Corn (91) Corn (87) Corn (90) Corn (79) Corn (68) Corn (58) Cattle (95) Horses (93) Chicken (91) Cattle (89) Cattle (81) Soybeans (68) Soybeans (65) Soybeans (62) Soybeans (54) Chicken (95) Chicken (93) Corn (91) Oats (83) Hogs (69) Cattle (60) Cattle (47) Hay (42) Hay (36) Corn (94) Corn (90) Horses (84) Chicken (82) Hay (62) Hay (56) Hay (46) Cattle (42) Cattle (33) Hogs (89) Hogs (93) Hogs (81) Hogs (79) Soybeans (57) Hogs (50) Hogs (35) Hogs (19) Horses (13) Apples (84) Hay (82) Hay (80) Hay (72) Oats (57) Oats (34) Oats (25) Oats (12) Hogs (12) Hay (82) Potatoes (64) Oats (74) Horses (42) Chicken (48) Horses (13) Horses (10) Horses (11) Oats (8) Oats (81) Apples (56) Apples (41) Soybeans (37) Horses (26) Chicken (9) Sheep (8) Sheep (4) Sheep (4) Potatoes (62) Oats (52) Soybeans (40) Potatoes (18) Sheep (17) Sheep (8) Chicken (5) Chicken (2) Chicken (2) Cherries (57) Grapes (28) Grapes (23) Sheep (16) Potatoes (6) Wheat (1) Ducks (1) Goats (1) Goats (1) Wheat (36) Plums (28) Potatoes (23) Ducks (5) Wheat (3) Goats (1) Goats (1) Ducks & Geese (1) Plums (29) Cherries (24) Cherries (20) Apples (5) Sorghum (2) Ducks (1) Wheat (1) Grapes (28) Sheep (21) Peaches (16) Cherries (4) Red Clover (2) Ducks (18) Peaches (16) Sheep (16) Peaches (4) Apples (2) Geese (18) Pears (16) Plums (15) Goats (4) Ducks (2) Strawberry (17) Mules (13) Pears (13) Grapes (3) Goats (2) Pears (17) Ducks (12) Red clover (10) Pears (3) Geese (1) Mules (14) Wheat (12) Mules (6) Plums (3) Sheep (14) Geese (11) Strawberry (6) Wheat (3) Timothy Peaches Bees (10) (9) (9) Sorghum Barley Red clover (9) (9) (9) Ducks Wheat Timothy (6) (4) (4) Red clover Geese Popcorn (3) (3) (2) In 2007, Barley Raspberry Turkeys (9) (7) (7) Strawberry Soybeans Raspberry (8) (8) (6) Geese Rye Popcorn (3) (2) (2) Timothy Swt potato Sweet corn (2) (2) (1) <2% of Iowa farms grew Wt.melon Syrup Sorg Gooseberry (6) (6) (3) Bees Timothy Turkeys (5) (5) (4) Sweet corn Raspberry Bees (2) (2) (2) Turkeys (1) fruits and vegetables Sweet corn Apricots Tomatoes (2) (2) (2) Rye Popcorn Sweet corn (2) (2) (2) Sorghum (1) on .04% of farmland Cabbage (1) Swt clover (1) Popcorn (1) Goats (1) Currants (1) n = 34 n = 33 n = 29 n = 26 n = 17 n = 12 n = 12 n = 10 n = 11 Prepared by Michael Carolan, Sociology Department, Iowa State University. Data is from U.S. Census of Agriculture. Updated to include 2002 data by Andrew Benjamin, Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, Iowa State Univeristy. Data is from the U.S. Census of Agriculture. Notes about this table can be found on the next page. Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Ag Production Does Not Meet Dietary Guidelines Dietary Guidelines for a 2,000 calorie diet 2003 ERS Food Guide Pyramid Servings 3.00 3.0 3.0 2.5 2.25 2.0 1.9 1.8 1.50 0.9 0.9 0.75 0 Fruit Vegetables Milk Whole Grains Buzby J, Wells H, Vocke G. Possible Implications for U.S. Agriculture from Adoption of Select Dietary Guidelines. Washington, DC: USDA Economic Research Service; November 2006 Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Brooks N, Regmi A, Jerado A. U.S. Food Import Patterns. USDA Economic Research Service. FAU-125, August 2009. Friday, October 16, 2009
    • “Good Food” Trivia With more than 7,000 species of plants available for food, what three foods account for 60% of the total caloric intake of the human diet? a) Wheat, rice and sugar cane b) Wheat, rice and corn c) Rice, corn and soybeans d) Corn, soybeans and potatoes Friday, October 16, 2009
    • “Good Food” Trivia With more than 7,000 species of plants available for food, what three foods account for 60% of the total caloric intake of the human diet? a) Wheat, rice and sugar cane b) Wheat, rice and corn c) Rice, corn and soybeans d) Corn, soybeans and potatoes b) Wheat, rice and corn account for 60% of the total caloric diet of the human diet worldwide. Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Nourishing the earth... Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Garden, Garden Revolution • 7 million new gardeners this year • Sweeping the nation • Public policy • Practice Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Food Independence Day Campaign Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Why I’m a Victory Grower Kids Video Campaign Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Emerging Trends and Opportunities! • Gardening is now viewed as being integral to a number of pressing issues: • Food security • Food deserts/access • Community and youth development • Community health • Public health – CDC • Social justice • Green jobs • Workforce development Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Emerging Trends • Gardening/food systems is cutting across a number of federal agencies • USDA • Urban Development • HUD • DHHS • CDC • Education • Labor Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Emerging Trends • Unprecedented interest in gardening • Interest in scaling up production • Urban agriculture • Exploding interest among faith communities • Civic engagement • Pervasive use of social media to link, promote, engage Friday, October 16, 2009
    • National Efforts • Closer partnership with USDA to develop a national gardening initiative • White House Garden • Victory Grower Campaign Food Independence Day • Reclaiming Civic Spaces: SF Victory Garden, People’s Garden, White House • Desire for engagement Friday, October 16, 2009
    • “Good Food” Trivia What garden is located on the National Mall in Washington, DC a) White House Garden b) Peter Rabbit’s Garden c) US Botanic Garden d) USDA Peoples Garden Friday, October 16, 2009
    • “Good Food” Trivia What garden is located on the National Mall in Washington, DC a) White House Garden b) Peter Rabbit’s Garden c) US Botanic Garden d) USDA Peoples Garden d) The USDA Peoples Garden is located on the National Mall in Washington, DC in front of the Whitten Building Friday, October 16, 2009
    • www.usda.gov/knowyourfarmer Friday, October 16, 2009
    • National Efforts • Blurring of gardening/ urban ag • Chicago Urban Ag Symposium • National Urban Ag Conference • NIFA • Urban Ag/Local Food Systems Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Encourage Even MORE Change… • Encourage a gardening ethos at all • Begin actively coordinating local levels…policy, practice and personal foodsheds value • Embark upon a fundamental • Be radical – and intentional – about restructuring of agricultural and land use and zoning policies that food policies. This includes NOT support gardening and urban referring to fruits and vegetables as agriculture “Specialty Crops” • Develop local, regional, state, • Develop – and mandate – a national federal polices that support curriculum that educates youth gardening and urban agriculture about food systems, environment, healthy lifestyle and • Make nutrition – particularly childhood nutrition - a national • Make this simultaneously a priority grassroots effort (PEOPLE), a goal of PRIVATE enterprises, and a • Explicitly link school lunch series of nationally-driven programs with school and governmental initiative (PUBLIC community-based garden efforts POLICY) and local food projects • Reconsider certain food acquisition policies for public institutions Friday, October 16, 2009
    • How will you contribute to a gardening ethos? Friday, October 16, 2009
    • Thank you! Friday, October 16, 2009