Ions in aqueous solutions and Colligative properties<br />Chapter 14.1<br />
Objectives<br />Write equations for the dissolution of soluble ionic compounds in water.<br />Predict whether a precipitat...
Dissociation<br />Defined as:  the separation of ions that occurs when  an ionic compound dissolves.<br />NaCl(s)         ...
<ul><li>How many moles of aluminum ions and sulfate ions are produced by dissolving 1 mol of aluminum sulfate?</li></ul>Al...
Precipitation Reactions<br />Solubility Guidelines  ( Table pg. 900 in text)<br />Most sodium, potassium, and ammonium com...
Will a precipitate form?<br />(NH4)2S (s)                   2 NH4+ (aq)  +   S2- (aq)<br />Cd(NO3)2 (s)                  C...
Net ionic equations<br />Includes only those compounds and ions that undergo a chemical change in a reaction in an aqueous...
Ionization<br />Ions are formed from solute molecules by the action of the solvent in a process<br />Different than dissoc...
Strong and Weak Electrolytes<br />Strong electrolyte<br />Any compound whose dilute aqueous solutions conduct electricity ...
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Chapter 14.1 : Compounds in Aqueous Solutions

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Chapter 14.1 : Compounds in Aqueous Solutions

  1. 1. Ions in aqueous solutions and Colligative properties<br />Chapter 14.1<br />
  2. 2. Objectives<br />Write equations for the dissolution of soluble ionic compounds in water.<br />Predict whether a precipitate will form when solutions of soluble ionic compounds are combined, and write net ionic equations for precipitation reactions<br />Compare dissociation of ionic compounds with ionization of molecular compounds<br />Draw the structure of the hydronium ion, and explain why it is used to represent the hydrogen ion in solution<br />Distinguish between strong electrolytes and weak electrolytes<br />
  3. 3. Dissociation<br />Defined as: the separation of ions that occurs when an ionic compound dissolves.<br />NaCl(s) Na+(aq) + Cl-(aq)<br />CaCl2(s) Ca2+(aq) + 2 Cl-(aq)<br />H2O<br />1 mol<br />1 mol<br />1 mol<br />H2O<br />2 mol<br />1 mol<br />1 mol<br /><ul><li>Write the equationfor the dissolution of aluminum sulfate, Al2(SO4)3, in water. </li></ul>Al2(SO4)3 (s) 2 Al3+3 (aq) + 3 SO42-(aq)<br />H2O<br />
  4. 4. <ul><li>How many moles of aluminum ions and sulfate ions are produced by dissolving 1 mol of aluminum sulfate?</li></ul>Al2(SO4)3 (s) 2 Al3+3 (aq) + 3 SO42-(aq)<br />H2O<br />3 mol<br />1 mol<br />2 mol<br /><ul><li>What is the total number of moles of ions produced by dissolving 1 mol of aluminum sulfate?</li></ul>5 mol of ions<br />
  5. 5. Precipitation Reactions<br />Solubility Guidelines ( Table pg. 900 in text)<br />Most sodium, potassium, and ammonium compounds are soluble in water.<br />Mostnitrates, acetates, andchloratesare soluble.<br />Most chlorides are soluble, except those silver, mercury(I), and lead. Lead(II) chloride is soluble in hot water.<br />Most sulfates are soluble, except those of barium, strontium, and lead.<br />Most carbonates, phosphates, and silicates are insoluble, except those of sodium potassium, andammonium.<br />Most sulfides are insoluble, except those of calcium, strontium, sodium, potassium, andammonium.<br />
  6. 6. Will a precipitate form?<br />(NH4)2S (s) 2 NH4+ (aq) + S2- (aq)<br />Cd(NO3)2 (s) Cd2+ (aq) + 2 NO3- (aq)<br />(NH4)2S (aq) + Cd(NO3)2 (aq) 2 NH4NO3 (aq) + CdS (s)<br />Double Replacement Reaction<br />Precipitate :<br /> Sulfides usually insoluble<br />
  7. 7. Net ionic equations<br />Includes only those compounds and ions that undergo a chemical change in a reaction in an aqueous solution.<br />2 NH4+(aq)+S2- (aq) + Cd2+(aq)+ 2 NO3-(aq) <br /> 2 NH4+ (aq)+2 NO3 -(aq) + CdS(s)<br />Overall Ionic equation<br />Spectator ions : Ions that do not take part in reaction<br />They are found in solution before and after reaction<br />Now , you have the Net Ionic Equation:<br /> Cd2+(aq)+ S2-(aq) CdS(s)<br />
  8. 8. Ionization<br />Ions are formed from solute molecules by the action of the solvent in a process<br />Different than dissociation<br />Molecular compounds form ions where there were none before<br />HCl H+ (aq) + Cl- (aq)<br />Hydronium ion<br />H3O+<br />H2O(l) + HCl(g) H3O+(aq) + Cl-(aq)<br />
  9. 9. Strong and Weak Electrolytes<br />Strong electrolyte<br />Any compound whose dilute aqueous solutions conduct electricity well; this is due to the presence of all or almost all of the dissolved compound in the form of ions.<br />HCl, HBr, and HI completely ionize in water.<br />H2O(l) + HCl(g) H3O+(aq) + Cl-(aq)<br />Weak electrolyte<br />Any compound whose dilute aqueous solutions conduct electricity poorly; this is due to the presence of a small amount of the dissolved compound in the form of ions.<br />HF(aq) + H2O(l) H3O+(aq) + F-(aq)<br />

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