Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Chapter 13.1: Types of Mixtures
Chapter 13.1: Types of Mixtures
Chapter 13.1: Types of Mixtures
Chapter 13.1: Types of Mixtures
Chapter 13.1: Types of Mixtures
Chapter 13.1: Types of Mixtures
Chapter 13.1: Types of Mixtures
Chapter 13.1: Types of Mixtures
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Chapter 13.1: Types of Mixtures

27,176

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
27,176
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
245
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Solutions<br />Chapter 13.1<br />Objectives:<br />Distinguish between heterogeneous and homogeneous mixtures.<br />List three different solute-solvent combinations<br />Compare the properties of suspensions, colloids, and solutions.<br />Distinguish between electrolytes and nonelectrolytes<br />
  • 2. Types of Mixtures<br />Soil<br />Can see all components<br />Rocks<br />Decomposed animal and plant parts<br />Milk<br />Does not appear to be a mixture<br />Fats, proteins, sugar, and water<br />Salt water<br />Looks just like water<br />Tastes like salt water<br />
  • 3. Heterogeneous mixture<br />Does not appear uniform throughout<br />Milk and soil<br />Homogeneous mixture<br />Appear s the same throughout<br />Salt water<br />
  • 4. Solutions<br />Soluble:<br />Capable of being dissolved<br />Sugar cube in water<br />Solution<br />Homogeneous mixture of two or more substances in a single phase<br />Same composition and properties throughout<br />Components of solutions<br />Solvent –<br />Dissolving medium (Larger amount)<br />Solute<br />Substance dissolved in solution (Smaller amount)<br />
  • 5. Types of Solutions<br />Can exist on all three phases<br />Gas, liquid, solid<br />Solute State Solvent State Example <br />Gas gas oxygen in air<br />Gas liquid oxygen in water<br />Liquid gas water in air<br />Liquid liquid alcohol in water<br />Liquid solid mercury in silver(dental filling)<br />Solid liquid sugar in water<br />Solid solid copper in nickel<br /><ul><li>Alloy:
  • 6. solution of different metals, keeping only desirable properties</li></li></ul><li>Suspensions<br />Definition:<br />Particles in a solvent are so large that they settle out unless the mixture is constantly stirred or agitated<br />Example:<br />Muddy water<br />Particles that are much larger (over 1000 times larger) form suspensions<br />Separated with<br />Filters<br />Will settle out due to gravity<br />Muddy water<br />
  • 7. Colloids<br />Defined as:<br />Particle that are intermediate in size between those in solutions and suspensions .<br />Particles between 1 nm to 1000 nm<br />Too small to be seen, but are suspended<br />Tyndell Effect<br />Light is scattered by colloidal particles<br />
  • 8. Solutes: Electrolytes vs. Nonelectrolytes<br />Electrolyte :<br />Substance that dissolves in water to give a solution that conducts electric current<br />Examples :<br />Sodium Chloride (ionic), HCl ( polar molecule)<br />Nonelectrolyte :<br />Substance that dissolves in water to give a solution that does not conduct an electric current<br />Examples :<br />Sugar solution (nonpolar molecule)<br />

×