The make them or break them years
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The make them or break them years

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Invigorate your middle school library program.

Invigorate your middle school library program.

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  • 1. THE MAKE THEM OR BREAK THEM YEARS ENGAGING READERS THROUGH THEIR TWEEN AND TEEN YEARS WITH C AT H Y F I S C H B U C H
  • 2. A LITTLE ABOUT ME I took a long hiatus from reading through my teen years, but still had time to read Asterix & Obelix and Tin Tin. Our school library was very dated, had a librarian who had very little interest, and we did not have a scheduled weekly visit after Grade 6. So my link with reading pretty much disappeared (I was the student you have trouble with!)
  • 3. G.S. LAKIE MIDDLE SCHOOL Our school population is roughly 760 students in grades 6,7, 8. 60+ staff. The school is 10 years old and was built for 600 students. I host 27 L.A. classes in the library each week.
  • 4. WHY THE MIDDLE YEARS ARE IMPORTANT? http://usbornebooksgeorgia.blogspot.ca/2012/09/raise-reader-infogram.html
  • 5. WHAT THE TYPICAL DAY LOOKS LIKE
  • 6. LIBRARY DISPLAYS Guess the reader? Contest Staff covered their faces with books they’d read from our library. Student had to guess who’s who.
  • 7. For those about to Rock – images and books all Related to Rock-n-Roll
  • 8. Fresh new titles to get caught up in.
  • 9. Wordle representing everything that libraries are.
  • 10. Went with “It Came From the Library Poster Contest”
  • 11. Need ideas for your next bulletin board or would like to share some of your great ideas, check out http://schoollibrarydisplays.blogspot.ca/
  • 12. FUN STUFF – PICMONKEY IT CAME FROM THE LIBRARY CAPTION AND POSTER CONTEST
  • 13. WORDPHOTO APP Costs $2.00
  • 14. TAXEDO
  • 15. SKYPE We skyped with various authors last year (no cost for any of them.) We also have presented live webcasts through Scholastic - http://www.scholastic.com/livewebcasts/webcast_tips.htm Taylor Swift wowed them, Rick Riordan had them in the palm of his hand. Occasionally we showcase an author or illustrator during scheduled library time – http://www.ted.com/talks/jarrett_j_krosoczka_how_a_boy_became_an_artist.html You never know, this might be the spark for one of them to become a great artist or writer.
  • 16. BOOKTRAILERS AND VOKI http://www.onetruemedia.com/shared?p=ef8d5107 f5c866f6ced3cf&skin_id=701&utm_source=otm &utm_medium=text_url http://www.onetruemedia.com/shared?p=9bcf4273 7ebebf007a3697&skin_id=701&utm_source=otm &utm_medium=text_url http://www.voki.com/pickup.php?scid=5305123&h eight=267&width=200
  • 17. NOVEL STUDIES AND PROJECTS Schooled by Gordon Korman – grade 7 novel study Included tai-chi, tofu cookout, and tie-dying (in the library)
  • 18. READING OLYMPICS
  • 19. DROP EVERYTHING AND READ – OCT. 22 / 2012
  • 20. BOOK TITLE POETRY – APRIL IS POETRY MONTH What have you got planned?
  • 21. READER’S ADVISORY SELF-DIRECTED Shelf talkers
  • 22. READER’S ADVISORY PEER-DIRECTED
  • 23. DISPLAY + PEER DIRECTED BOOKTALKS Adding value to the students library visit, trying to move students booktalks beyond “it was good”. It has improved their presentation skills, they have a better understanding of character development, and an overall shift in understanding choices an author makes in stylistic elements.
  • 24. READER’S ADVISORY TEACHER OR LIBRARIAN DIRECTED I use this method of table talks quite often. I give a real quick 30 second review and move on. Sometimes the books are theme related (above are survival books), sometimes non-fiction, skinny books.
  • 25. READER’S ADVISORY CATALOGUE-DIRECTED
  • 26. READER’S ADVISORY / BOOKTALKING Costumes, props, and acting out sections of a book are always memorable.
  • 27. READER’S ADVISORY / BOOKTRAILERS Publisher supply great booktrailers , and most have their own youtube channels. Check out these sites. https://www.youtube.com/user/PenguinYoungReaders?feature=watch http://www.youtube.com/user/harperteen/videos?view=0 http://www.youtube.com/user/macmillanchildrens http://www.youtube.com/user/hmhbooks http://www.youtube.com/user/disneyhyperion http://www.youtube.com/user/TheScholasticChannel
  • 28. READER’S ADVISORY BLOG-DIRECTED http://lakielibrary.wordpress.com/
  • 29. http://www.glogster.com/cfischbuch/new-march-titles-for-our-library/g6ktopgt2q8i65g5jlee97a0
  • 30. ADVOCACY • Keep a story file (mine contains read aloud pages) and be ready to share • Write a column in your school newsletter or PTA news • Feed your teachers exciting things you find on the web that will enhance the curriculum • Start a Language Arts team, share successes and failures • Start a blog • Hold an open house night or morning • Use your space as a showcase – not only for library or LA related subjects – science fair projects, history fair projects, art • Don’t be afraid to ask, what’s worst they can say? • Prove you know more than just books, become the go-to person • Work with a team – LA teachers, librarians, your great readers • Ask teachers / staff to do some of the reading for you • Kids first, everything else second • Share, collaborate, relax the library paradigm, think outside the box • Don’t advocate for libraries or librarians. Advocate for kids! Advocate for learning!
  • 31. JUSTIFY YOUR VALUE IT’S NOT BRAGGING IF IT’S TRUE Show them with stats. http://www.mindomo.com/#edit/c751a64f8c2d43efb27f6ebc45324b2b Show them with pictures. http://www.picturetrail.com/sfx/flicks/share/8834228 Invite them into your world
  • 32. RELAX THE LIBRARY PARADIGM
  • 33. OVERWHELMED Start with one thing. Make sure it’s something you want to do – not a chore.
  • 34. WHERE I WANT TO GO NEXT The library as a Maker-Space The library as the directors studio The library as the venue for the next poetry slam The library as the world headquarters for the next Amazing Rac
  • 35. PARTING IDEAS
  • 36. I wish you a day of ordinary (library) miracles and little things to rejoice in… Eight hands that go up to request the title you’ve just book talked. A computer that goes for an entire day without crashing. A less-than-successful baking experiment taken to the teachers lounge, eaten before 10 am. A child asking for another book “just like this one.” Finding a "app" that saves you time. Watching a student successfully use the newest database to find needed information. A parking spot close to the school door. The principal saying a sincere thank-you. An unexpected larger amount on your paycheck or a smaller amount on your mortgage payment. A new book just published by your favorite author. A student who is actually concerned about the quality of his work. A dozen doughnuts as “thanks” for service above and beyond the call. A quick and pleasant response from a technician. Kids who want to help you. A teacher saying out loud in the lounge how much she uses the online tool you showed her. A human voice on the phone when you expected a recording. A student who wants to become a librarian when she grows up. A chance to show a tech-tip to a teacher who thinks you are a “guru.” A library with windows and sunbeams in the winter. A request to use the library for a meeting because “it is the most pleasant room in the school.” A smile of accomplishment from a student who shows you how to do something on your smartphone. A quickly-answered reference question asked by a teacher. A library aid you like and who likes you. A call from a parent thanking you for the information on your webpage. A student so absorbed in a book, he doesn’t hear the bell ring. A call from a parent about a lost book found while cleaning. A student who wants to hold your hand. Students who give genuine praise to each other.