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MNTHS Youth Truth Survey Results 2010-2011

MNTHS Youth Truth Survey Results 2010-2011

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  • 1. CONFIDENTIAL YouthTruth A Beneficiary Perception Report A Beneficiary Perception Report prepared for  Manor New Technology High School gy g February 2011 675 Massachusetts Avenue   7th Floor   Cambridge, MA  02139 100 Montgomery Street  Suite 1700   San Francisco, CA 941040  www.effectivephilanthropy.org   CONFIDENTIAL © Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.
  • 2. Beneficiary Perception Contents Report I. Introduction 2 II. Executive Summary and Overall Items 7 III. Themes of Student Perceptions a) ) Relationships with Teachers p 12 b) School Culture and Attitudes 19 c) Future Goals and Aspirations 24 d) Life Outside of High School 35 e) Rigor of Classes and Instruction 40 IV. Assessment of School Support Services 57 V. V Summary of Qualitative Feedback 62 VI. Review of Findings and Areas for Discussion 67 VII. Student Demographics and School Resources 74 VIII. VIII Appendix 86 oductionI. Intro 1 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 3. Beneficiary Perception Background Report  The YouthTruth Beneficiary Perception Report (BPR) helps schools assess their performance, performance compared to other schools, by documenting students ‘ perceptions schools about their school experience and about how well their school is preparing them for their future. - The YouthTruth BPR shows an individual school its students ‘ perceptions relative to those of other students at schools whose students were surveyed. U l th f th t d t t h l h t d t d Unless otherwise th i noted, this report provides comparative data from 119 schools, collected across four rounds of surveying since 2009. With only 119 schools in the comparative dataset, this should not be considered a comprehensive benchmarking study. - Questions on the Y hT h survey seek to understand many aspects of students ‘ Q i h YouthTruth k d d f d experiences, including: - Impressions of their school culture - Perceptions of the rigor of their classes and instruction - Perceptions about how their school experience is helping them achieve their goals - Their relationships with teachers and with adults outside of school, and - Perceptions about the strengths and weaknesses of their school. - Student perceptions should be interpreted in light of the particular philosophy, oduction educational approach, and local context of a given school. As such, a “lower rating” on a p particular dimension is not necessarily negative if that topic is not a focus for a g y g p givenI. Intro school. 2 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 4. Beneficiary Perception Methodology (1) Report  This YouthTruth Beneficiary Perception Report (BPR) contains data collected from students who attend 119 schools across 15 districts and networks 1 The details of Manor New Technology High networks. School ‘s surveys are: Number of Number of Survey Su ey e od Survey Period Stude ts Students Responses espo ses Response espo se Surveyed Received Rate2 November 2010 332 298 90% February 2010 305 288 94%  Manor New Technology High School (MNTHS) is compared to a cohort of schools from NewTech Network (NewTech). The schools that comprise this group are: NewTech Schools Algiers Technology Academy New Tech High @ Arsenal Anderson New Technology High School New Tech High @ Zion-Benton East Bogalusa New Tech High School New Technology High School: Napa Columbus Signature Academy -New Tech North Daviess 21st Century High School Da Vinci Charter Academy Sacramento New Technology High School oduction Danville New Tech High School Satellite Center Manor New Technology High School Student Empowerment Academy METSA @ R.L. Turner High School Tech Valley High School New Tech Academy @ Wayne High School Warren New Tech High SchoolI. Intro 1: For a list of participating districts and networks included in the comparative set, please see the appendix. 3 2: The average response rate for the 119 schools that have participated in YouthTruth is 79 percent. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 5. Beneficiary Perception Methodology (2) Report  Throughout this report, where possible, students ‘ average ratings at MNTHS are shown segmented by the following grade levels: Freshmen Sophomores Juniors and Seniors Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors.  Two students did not identify their grade level and are only included in MNTHS ‘s overall average. Grade Level Number of Students Freshmen 92 Sophomores 71 Juniors 70 Seniors 63 oductionI. Intro 4 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 6. Beneficiary Perception Reading BPR Charts – Sample Charts Report Much of the student perception data in the BPR is presented in the formats below. These charts show a e age at gs o stude t espo ses o average ratings of student responses for MNTHS, the range of school ratings, and average ratings for S, t e a ge o sc oo at gs, a d a e age at gs o students by grade level, as applicable. Throughout the report, charts in this format are truncated from the full scale because school averages do not fall below a value of 2 on the 1-5 scale. Strongly Truncated Chart agree 5.0 50 Truncated Chart NewTech Grade Level Schools 1=Strongly 5=Strongly negative positive The solid black line represents Top of 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 the range between the average range school ratings of the highest and lowest rated schools in the cohort of NewTech schools. Somewhat agree 4.0 75th percentile Middle fifty percent of school average ratings The green bar represents the 50th percentile average student rating for t d t ti f (median) ( di ) MNTHS in ‘10-‘11. The purple bar represents the 25th percentile Full range of school average student rating for average ratings MNTHS in ‘09-‘10. The long red line represents Neither the average student rating of MNTHS ‘10-‘11 agree nor 3.0 the median school in the full disagree comparative set. MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Median NewTech oduction The blue bar represents the Bottom of School average student rating of the range Range of median school in the cohort of NewTech NewTech schools. SchoolsI. Intro Freshmen MNTHS Grade e The shapes represent the average ratings of Sophomores Level Somewhat disagree Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors 2.0 Juniors, and Seniors. 1=Strongly disagree Note: Scale ends at 2.0 Seniors 5 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 7. Beneficiary Perception Contents Report I. Introduction 2 II. Executive Summary and Overall Items 7 III. Themes of Student Perceptions a) ) Relationships with Teachers p 12 b) School Culture and Attitudes 19 c) Future Goals and Aspirations 24 d) Life Outside of High School 35 e) Rigor of Classes and Instruction 40 ecutive Summa and Overa Items IV. Assessment of School Support Services 57 all V. V Summary of Qualitative Feedback 62 VI. Review of Findings and Areas for Discussion 67 VII. Student Demographics and School Resources 74 ary VIII. VIII Appendix 86II. Exe 6 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 8. Beneficiary Perception Executive Summary Report Students at Manor New Technology High School (“MNTHS”) rate their school very positively overall and more positively than students at the typical school that has participated in YouthTruth. MNTHS is also rated more positively than the typical NewTech Network school on most measures within this report. Students agree more strongly than typical that they are getting a high quality education at MNTHS. One MNTHS student comments, “Manor NewTech is going to get me somewhere…. I am certain that this school is going to get me where I need and hope to be.” When looking at student ratings across time, MNTHS ‘10-‘11 is rated higher than ratings received in ‘09-‘10 on nearly all measures within this report. Student-teacher relationships at MNTHS are rated more positively than is typical. Compared to students at the typical school, students at MNTHS indicate that more of their teachers are willing to give extra help on school work if needed, try to be fair, and make an effort to understand what their life is like outside of school. Students comment on their supportive teachers that “care about [students] getting…work done on time and correctly. They encourage [students] to ask a lot of questions to really understand what [they are] learning.” They also agree more strongly than typical that there is at least one teacher who would write them a recommendation for a job, program, scholarship, or college, and that their teachers ‘ expectations make them want to do their best. Students at MNTHS continue to have more positive perceptions of their school culture than do students at the typical school. MNTHS students more strongly agree than typical that there is respect between adults and students and that their classmates care about succeeding academically. They also more strongly agree that they enjoy coming to school than is typical. When asked to indicate the most ecutive Summa and Overa Items important thing that their school provides to help them do their best in class, students most frequently mention the positive culture at MNTHS. One student comments, “If we wanna give up the teachers and students won’t let us because of our culture.” Students agree more strongly all than typical that discipline at MNTHS is fair although some students continue to mention “disrespectful” and “disruptive students ” fair, disrespectful disruptive students. Compared to students at the typical school, students at MNTHS more strongly agree that they will have more options after graduating because of what their school has done for them. A larger proportion of students expect to go to a four-year college than is typical, and students more strongly agree that MNTHS has helped them develop the skills and knowledge they will need for college and has helped them understand the steps needed in order to apply to college. One student says, “I will have many options for me once I graduate ary because this school has given me and continues to give me more knowledge of what is in store for me in the future ” Students at MNTHS future. report a typical frequency of conversations with adults at school about their future. The rigor of classes and instruction at MNTHS is rated higher than typical. Students agree more strongly than typical that the work they do in class makes them think and that their teachers understand the subjects they are teaching. Students most frequently mention better course selection at MNTHS as a way in which the school could change to help students do their best in class. Students comment on wanting more course electives saying “It would be cool that when we have all the classes we need to get our credits if there are extra classes we electives, saying, It that, credits,II. Exe could take to fill in the periods.” While students report spending a typical amount of time on homework outside of class, they frequently request more time to do work in school. “We have a lot of work here and lots to do. It is a challenging school and I work very hard in class to get what I need done, but sometimes there isn ‘t enough time. I would like a study hall to get with my groups and work or to just do extra credit,” says one student. 7 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 9. Beneficiary Perception Options After Graduating from High School Report When asked whether they agree that they would have more options after graduating because of what their school has done for them, students at MNTHS rate their school:  Higher than students at the median school  Higher than students at the median NewTech school Increased Options After Graduation Selected Student Comments Strongly agree 5.0 NewTech Schools Grade Level Top of  “I think that this school is getting you ready for the real range world. The experience I gain here at Manor New Technology High School will help me when and if I find myself struggling in the future. I feel that all my Sophomores overlaps Freshmen. hard work will eventually pay off ” off. 75th percentile MNTHS ‘09-‘10 overlaps  “Any high school could have got me into the program I Median NewTech School. am in. 99.9 percent of the workforce went to regular ecutive Summa and Overa Items Somewhat 4.0 50th percentile schools. They are doing just fine. It is ignorant to think agree (median) I will do better than all of them because of New Tech.” all  “We get more credits and since everything is project We 1-5 Scale 25th percentile based and you have to work with people in your group like you would with people at a job, I feel like we have a head start. We ‘re already used to working with partners and working things out and presenting, when MNTHS ‘10-‘11 ary Neither kids from mot other high schools are not.” agree nor MNTHS ‘09 ‘10 09- 10 3.0  “This school has not prepared me for college, the disagree Bottom of range Median NewTech courses are not challenging enough.” School Range of  “I believe that this school prepares me for the college NewTech experiences I ‘ll encounter more than if I attended the Schools Freshmen regular high school.” MNTHS GradeII. Exe Sophomores Level Juniors Somewhat 2.0 Seniors disagree Note: Scale ends at 2.0 1=Strongly disagree 8 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 10. Beneficiary Perception Quality of Education Report When asked how strongly they believe they are getting a high-quality education, students at MNTHS rate:  Higher than students at the median school g  Higher than students at the median NewTech school I am getting a high quality education at this school Strongly agree 5.0 50 NewTech Grade Level Schools Top of range 75th percentile Somewhat 4.0 50th percentile ecutive Summa and Overa Items agree (median) 1-5 Scale all 25th percentile til MNTHS ‘10-‘11 ary Neither agree MNTHS ‘09-‘10 nor disagree 3.0 g Bottom of Median range NewTech School Range of NewTech Schools Freshmen MNTHS Grade Sophomores G Level lII. Exe Juniors Somewhat disagree 2.0 Seniors Note: Scale ends at 2.0 1=Strongly disagree 9 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 11. Beneficiary Perception Pride and Enjoyment Report On the measure of students ‘ pride in their school work, On the measure of how much students enjoy coming to MNTHS is rated: school, MNTHS is rated:  Higher than the median school  Higher than the median school  Higher than the median NewTech school  Higher than the median NewTech school I take pride in my school work I enjoy coming to school most of Strongly Strongly the time agree 5.0 agree 5.0 NewTech Grade Level NewTech Grade Level Schools Schools Top of range p g Seniors overlaps Sophomores. 75th percentile Top of Somewhat 50th percentile Somewhat range agree 4.0 agree 4.0 (median) 25th percentile 75th percentile p ns emes of Stude Perception 1-5 Scale th percentile 1-5 Scale 50 Bottom of (median) range 25th percentile MNTHS ‘10-‘11 ent Neither Neither agree nor 3.0 30 MNTHS ‘09 ‘10 09- 10 agree nor 3.0 30 disagree Median disagree NewTech School Range of NewTech Schools Bottom of Freshmen deIII. The range MNTHS Grad Sophomores Level Juniors Somewhat Somewhat disagree 2.0 Seniors disagree 2.0 Note: Scale ends at 2.0 Note: Scale ends at 2.0 1=Strongly disagree 1=Strongly disagree10 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 12. Beneficiary Perception Contents Report I. Introduction 2 II. Executive Summary and Overall Items 7 III. Themes of Student Perceptions a) ) Relationships with Teachers p 12 b) School Culture and Attitudes 19 c) Future Goals and Aspirations 24 d) Life Outside of High School 35 e) Rigor of Classes and Instruction 40 IV. Assessment of School Support Services 57 ns V. V Summary of Qualitative Feedback 62 emes of Stude Perception VI. Review of Findings and Areas for Discussion 67 VII. Student Demographics and School Resources 74 ent VIII. VIII Appendix 86III. The11 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 13. Beneficiary Perception Themes of Student Perceptions Report CEP grouped 32 individual questions from the YouthTruth survey into the five themes shown below. The five themes each include a summary measure capturing data from statistically related questions measure, that fall within that theme.1 Describes the extent to which students receive Relationships with Teachers personal and academic support from teachers Describes the school ‘s environment and the s School Culture and Attitudes degree to which students experience a fair and respectful school culture 32 Individual Describes students ‘ goals for their future and Questions Future Goals and Aspirations activities they engage in to support these goals ns emes of Stude Perception Describes how students ‘ lives outside of school Life Outside of High School impact their future plans Describes the degree to which students feel Rigor of Classes and Instruction challenged to work hard, think critically, and ent participate in rigorous classroom activitiesIII. The 1: To identify summary measures, CEP used maximum likelihood factor analysis, a statistical tool that analyzes underlying patterns in the data. The summary measures for Relationships with Teachers, School Culture and Attitudes, Future Goals and Aspirations, and Life Outside of High School include data collected from all schools that have participated in YouthTruth. The items comprising the Rigor of Classes and Instruction summary measure were added to the survey as of the November 2009 survey round, and therefore have only been asked of students attending the schools that have participated since then.12 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 14. Beneficiary Perception Student Relationships with Teachers Report The Relationships with Teachers summary measure describes the degree to which students have positive interactions with teachers who are supportive and keep them on track academically. pp p y  MNTHS is rated higher than the median school on this measure.  MNTHS is rated higher than the median NewTech school on this measure. Survey Questions Included in Measure Relationships With Teachers Summary Measure How many of your t H f teachers are willing to give h illi t i More 5.0 extra help on school work if you need it? positive NewTech Grade Level relationships Schools How many of your teachers try to be fair? How many of your teachers believe you can get a good grade if you try? How many of your teachers are not just satisfied if Top of you pass; they care if you ‘re really learning? range How many of your teachers make connections 4.0 between what you ‘re learning in class to life 75th percentile ns outside the classroom? Seniors overlaps Sophomores Sophomores. emes of Stude Perception How many of your teachers make an effort to 50th percentile (median) understand what your life is like outside of school? 25th percentile ent MNTHS ‘10 ‘11 10- 11 3.0 Bottom of MNTHS ‘09-‘10 range Median NewTech School Range of NewTechIII. The Schools Freshmen 1=Less MNTHS Grade positive Sophomores Level relationships Juniors 2.0 Note: Scale ends at 2.0 Seniors13 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 15. Beneficiary Perception Student Relationships with Teachers Report Average Rating Items Included in 1=None, 2=Few, 3=Half, 4=Most, 5=All Summary Measure 2.0 20 3.0 30 4.0 40 5.0 50 MNTHS ‘09-‘10 overlaps Median NewTech School. How many of your teachers are willing to give extra help on school work if you need it? y Sophomores overlaps Freshmen. How many of your teachers try ns to be fair? emes of Stude Perception How many of your teachers ent believe you can get a good grade if you try? Sophomores overlaps Freshmen. Note: Scales end at 2.0III. The Full range Middle fifty Median Range of Median MNTHS MNTHS of school percent of school NewTech NewTech Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors School ‘10-‘11 ‘09-‘10 avg. ratings avg. ratings School Schools14 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 16. Beneficiary Perception Student Relationships with Teachers Report Average Rating Items Included In 1=None, 2=Few, 3=Half, 4=Most, 5=All Summary Measure 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 MNTHS ‘09-‘10 overlaps Median NewTech School. How many of your teachers are not just satisfied if you pass, j y p , they care if you ‘re really learning? How many of your teachers ns emes of Stude Perception make connections between what you ‘re learning in class to life outside of the classroom? ent How many of your teachers make an effort to understand what your life is like outside of school? Juniors overlaps Freshmen and Sophomores.III. The Note: Scales end at 2 0 2.0 Full range Middle fifty Median Range of Median MNTHS MNTHS of school percent of school NewTech NewTech Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors School ‘10-‘11 ‘09-‘10 avg. ratings avg. ratings School Schools15 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 17. Beneficiary Perception Personal Support from Teachers Report When asked if there is at least one teacher who would When asked if there is at least one teacher who would write help them with a personal problem, students at MNTHS them a recommendation for a job, program, scholarship, or rate their school: college, students at MNTHS rate their school:  Similar to students at the median school  Higher than students at the median school  Similar to students at the median NewTech school  Higher than students at the median NewTech school One teacher…would help me with a One teacher…would write me a recommendation Strongly personal problem l bl Strongly for j b f a job, program, scholarship, or college h l hi ll agree 5.0 agree 5.0 NewTech Grade Level NewTech Grade Level Schools Schools Top of Top of range range 75th percentile MNTHS ‘09-‘10 overlaps Sophomores overlaps Freshmen. Median NewTech School. 50th percentile Somewhat Somewhat agree 4.0 75th percentile agree 4.0 (median) MNTHS ‘10-‘11 overlaps Median NewTech School. 25th percentile ns 50th percentile emes of Stude Perception 1-5 Scale e 1-5 Scale (median) Bottom of 25thpercentile range Bottom of range MNTHS ‘10-‘11 ent Neither Neither agree nor 3.0 agree nor 3.0 MNTHS ‘09-‘10 disagree disagree Median NewTech School Range of NewTech SchoolsIII. The Freshmen F h MNTHS Grade Sophomores Level Juniors Somewhat Somewhat disagree 2.0 disagree 2.0 Seniors Note: Scale ends at 2.0 Note: Scale ends at 2.0 1=Strongly disagree 1=Strongly disagree16 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 18. Beneficiary Perception What Students Are Saying… Report Below are selected student comments related to the theme of Student Relationships with Teachers. For a full list of comments, please see your Student Comments Table. Selected Comments – Student Relationships with Teachers  “No matter what question I have, teachers will answer anything. Even when I need help with my homework, I can email them and they will respond.”  “There are some teachers who doesn ‘t give g g good directions or g give directions that has nothing to do with the work that they have assigned and then I become confused on what was going on.”  “Having teachers give me extra help in certain things that I don ‘t understand or have trouble ns doing is of big help because when they individually sit with me and explain in a better specific emes of Stude Perception way, helps me understand better and be more positive towards the work I get done and improves my grade much more.”  “All of my teachers are great, but sometimes they don ‘t explain the assignment or project well ent enough, enough so us students find it rather difficult to complete the given task ” task.  “I know I can always go to my teachers if I need help with anything.”III. The17 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 19. Beneficiary Perception Contents Report I. Introduction 2 II. Executive Summary and Overall Items 7 III. Themes of Student Perceptions a) ) Relationships with Teachers p 12 b) School Culture and Attitudes 19 c) Future Goals and Aspirations 24 d) Life Outside of High School 35 e) Rigor of Classes and Instruction 40 IV. Assessment of School Support Services 57 ns V. V Summary of Qualitative Feedback 62 emes of Stude Perception VI. Review of Findings and Areas for Discussion 67 VII. Student Demographics and School Resources 74 ent VIII. VIII Appendix 86III. The18 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 20. Beneficiary Perception School Culture and Attitudes Report The School Culture summary measure describes the level of perceived respect between adults and students and the degree to which students believe their classmates care about succeeding. g g  MNTHS is rated higher than the median school on this measure.  MNTHS is rated higher than the median NewTech school on this measure. School Culture Summary Measure More positive 5.0 NewTech Grade Level culture Schools Survey Questions Included in Summary Measure Most students in this school treat adults with respect. Top of Most students in this school want to do well in class. 4.0 range Most adults in this school treat students with ns emes of Stude Perception respect. t 75th percentile MNTHS ‘09-‘10 overlaps Median NewTech School. Discipline in this school is fair. 50th percentile (median) ent MNTHS ‘10-‘11 3.0 25th percentile MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Median NewTech School Range of Bottom of NewTech range SchoolsIII. The Freshmen MNTHS Grade Sophomores 1=Less Level positive Juniors culture 2.0 Seniors Note: Scale ends at 2.019 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 21. Beneficiary Perception School Culture and Attitudes Report Average Rating Items Included in It I l d di 1=Strongly disagree, 2=Somewhat disagree, Summary Measure 3=Neither agree nor disagree, 4=Somewhat agree, 5=Strongly agree 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 Most students in this school treat adults with respect. MNTHS ‘09-‘10 overlaps Median NewTech School. p Most students in this school want to do well in class. Seniors overlaps Sophomores. ns emes of Stude Perception Most adults in this school treat students with respect. ent Juniors overlaps Freshmen. Freshmen Discipline in this school is fair.III. The Juniors overlaps Freshmen. Note: Scales end at 2.0 Full range Middle fifty Median Range of Median MNTHS MNTHS of school percent of school NewTech NewTech Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors School ‘10-‘11 ‘09-‘10 avg. ratings avg. ratings School Schools20 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 22. Beneficiary Perception What Students Are Saying… Report Below are selected student comments related to the theme of School Culture and Attitudes. For a full list of comments, please see your Student Comments Table. Selected Comments – School Culture and Attitudes  “I feel like I will be respected and accepted and so when I do work with my peers I can speak my opinions and ideas and contribute to the work more effectively.”  “It is tiring to have to have the teacher take time off from teaching to deal with p g g problem students. They just need to grow up…. Those few students are also the ones who are getting privileges taken away from others.”  “In my old school there was lots of cussing and fighting but since I came to MNTHS there is ns lots less violence and cussing it makes me feel safe and all the students here are nice ” cussing, nice. emes of Stude Perception  “Offer more extracurricular activities or interaction with other schools. I know that the school has 4 years opened but they need to work more on providing more activities for the students to be involved with the school for example our own [sports] teams." ent  “We are a small school and we know each other well. The teachers give us good one-on- one attention. I feel safe here and this is a really really fun place to be.”III. The21 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 23. Beneficiary Perception School Environment Report Students were asked how strongly they agreed with several statements about their school ‘s environment, with 1=“Strongly disagree” and 5=“Strongly agree.” On average, compared to students at the median New Tech school, students at MNTHS more strongly agree that nearly all students and staff obey and enforce the rules and there is a process any student can use to raise concerns and help change the rules and policies at school. “How strongly do you agree or disagree with the following statements?” Average Ratings by Grade Level for MNTHS Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors 4.0 Nearly everyone at our school is accepted as 4.1 3.6 4.3 3.9 an individual 3.9 3.8 Nearly all students and ns staff obey and enforce emes of Stude Perception 4.2 42 3.5 35 4.1 41 3.5 35 the rules 3.5 ent There is a process any 3.8 student can use to raise concerns and 3.9 3.6 4.1 3.5 help change the rules 3.5 and policies at my schoolIII. The 1 2 3 4 5 Strongly Somewhat Neither agree Somewhat Strongly MNTHS disagree disagree nor disagree agree agree Median of New Tech Schools Note: Comparative data from the full YouthTruth dataset is not available because this question was asked only of22 students at New Tech Network. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy  2/10/2011
  • 24. Beneficiary Perception Contents Report I. Introduction 2 II. Executive Summary and Overall Items 7 III. Themes of Student Perceptions a) ) Relationships with Teachers p 12 b) School Culture and Attitudes 19 c) Future Goals and Aspirations 24 d) Life Outside of High School 35 e) Rigor of Classes and Instruction 40 IV. Assessment of School Support Services 57 ns V. V Summary of Qualitative Feedback 62 emes of Stude Perception VI. Review of Findings and Areas for Discussion 67 VII. Student Demographics and School Resources 74 ent VIII. VIII Appendix 86III. The23 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 25. Beneficiary Perception Future Goals and Aspirations Report The Goals and Aspirations summary measure describes the extent to which students are communicating with adults at school about how to achieve their future goals.  MNTHS is rated similar to the median school on this measure.  MNTHS is rated higher than the median NewTech school on this measure. Goals and Aspirations Summary Measure More 5.0 goal-oriented NewTech Grade Level Schools Survey Questions Included in Summary Measure In the past year, how often have you talked to an Top of adult at your school about how to decide what range 4.0 you want to do after you graduate? In the past year, how often have you talked to an p y , y ns emes of Stude Perception adult at your school about what classes you need to graduate? 75th percentile ent MNTHS ‘10-‘11 3.0 50th percentile MNTHS ‘09-‘10 (median) Median 25th percentile NewTech School Range of NewTech SchoolsIII. The Freshmen Bottom of MNTHS Grade Sophomores range Level 1=Less goal- Juniors oriented 2.0 Seniors Note: Scale ends at 2.024 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 26. Beneficiary Perception Future Goals and Aspirations Report Average Rating Items Included in 1=Never, 2=Rarely, 3=Sometimes, 4=Frequently, 5=Very frequently Summary Measure 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 In the past year, how often have you talked to an adult at school about how to decide what you want to do after you graduate? Sophomores overlaps Freshmen. In the past year, how often have you talked to an adult at school about what classes you need to graduate? ns emes of Stude Perception Other Related Item Not Included Average Rating in Summary Measure 1=Never, 2=Rarely, 3=Sometimes, 4=Frequently, 5=Very frequently 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 ent In the past year, how often have you talked with your friends about college?III. The Note: Scales end at 2.0 Full range Middle fifty Median Range of Median MNTHS MNTHS of school percent of school NewTech NewTech Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors School ‘10-‘11 ‘09-‘10 avg. ratings avg. ratings School Schools25 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 27. Beneficiary Perception Students ‘ Desire to Attend College (1) Report The proportion of MNTHS students who want to go to college is:  Similar to that of the average school  Similar to that of the average NewTech school Do you want to go to college? 100% No Maybe; I ‘m not sure 80% ndents 60% ns Percent of Respon emes of Stude Perception Yes 40% ent P 20%III. The 0% MNTHS ‘10-‘11 MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Average School Average NewTech School26 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 28. Beneficiary Perception Students ‘ Desire to Attend College (2) Report Do you want to go to college? 100% No Maybe; I ‘m not sure 80% ndents 60% ns Percent of Respon emes of Stude Perception Yes 40% ent P 20%III. The 0% Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors27 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 29. Beneficiary Perception Next Steps After High School (1) Report Compared to the proportion at the average school, a larger proportion of MNTHS students report that they expect to attend a 4-year college after g p y g graduating from high school. g g After you finish high school, what do you expect to do next?1 100% Undecided Other 80% spondents 60% ns Attend a 4 year 4-year Percent of Res emes of Stude Perception college 40% ent 20% Attend a 2-year college Work full time at a jobIII. The Join the military 0% MNTHS ‘10-‘11 Average School Average NewTech School 1: This question was added to the survey in the November 2010 survey round. Therefore, this chart only includes28 comparative data for the 54 schools that participated in the November 2010 round. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 30. Beneficiary Perception Next Steps After High School (2) Report After you finish high school, what do you expect to do next? 100% Undecided Other 80% ndents 60% ns Percent of Respon emes of Stude Perception Attend a 4-year college 40% ent P 20% Attend a 2-yearIII. The college Work full time at a job Join the military 0% Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors29 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 31. Beneficiary Perception College Preparation Report When students are asked whether their school has helped When students are asked whether their school has helped them them develop the skills and knowledge they will need for understand the steps they need to take in order to apply to college, college MNTHS is rated: college, college MNTHS is rated:  Higher than the median school  Higher than the median school  Higher than the median NewTech school  Higher than the median NewTech school Develop Skills/Knowledge for College1 Understand Steps to Apply to College1 Strongly 5.0 5.0 agree Strongly NewTech Grade Level agree NewTech Grade Level Schools Schools Top of range Top of Somewhat range agree 4.0 Somewhat 4.0 75th percentile agree Juniors overlaps Freshmen. 75th percentile cale cale ns 50th percentile 1-5 Sc emes of Stude Perception 50th percentile 1-5 Sc til (median) (median) 25th percentile 25th percentile Neither 3.0 Bottom of Bottom of range ent agree nor Neither 3.0 disagree range agree nor MNTHS ‘10-‘11 10 11 disagree MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Median NewTech School Range of NewTechIII. The Schools Somewhat Freshmen MNTHS Grade disagree Somewhat 2.0 disagree 2.0 Sophomores Level Note: Scale ends at 2.0 Note: Scale ends at 2.0 1=Strongly disagree 1=Strongly disagree Juniors Seniors 1: These questions were added to the survey in the November 2010 survey round. Therefore, these charts only include30 comparative data for the 54 schools that participated in the November 2010 round. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 32. Beneficiary Perception Career Preparation Report When students are asked whether their school has helped When students are asked whether their school has helped them them identify careers that match their interests and abilities, understand the steps they need to take in order to have the MNTHS is rated: careers they want MNTHS is rated: want,  Higher than the median school  Higher than the median school  Higher than the median NewTech school  Similar to the median NewTech school Identify Careers Suited to Understand Steps to Obtain Desired Strongly Interests/Abilities1 Strongly Careers1 5.0 50 5.0 50 agree agree NewTech Grade Level NewTech Grade Level Schools Schools Top of Top of range range Somewhat Somewhat agree 4.0 agree 4.0 ale ale ns 1-5 Sca 1-5 Sca emes of Stude Perception Juniors overlaps Sophomores. 75th percentile 75th percentile 50th percentile 50th percentile (median) Neither (median) Neither 25th percentile ent 3.0 MNTHS ‘10-‘11 agree nor g 3.0 agree nor g disagree 25th percentile disagree MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Bottom of Median Bottom of NewTech range range School Range of NewTech SchoolsIII. The Freshmen MNTHS Grade Sophomores Level Somewhat Somewhat disagree 2.0 disagree 2.0 Note: Scale ends at 2.0 Note: Scale ends at 2.0 Juniors 1=Strongly disagree 1=Strongly disagree Seniors 1: These questions were added to the survey in the November 2010 survey round. Therefore, these charts only include31 comparative data for the 54 schools that participated in the November 2010 round. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 33. Beneficiary Perception Considered Dropping Out of School (1) Report Compared to the proportion at the median school, a similar proportion of MNTHS students report that they have seriously considered dropping out of high school. The reasons most frequently mentioned by students for y pp g g q y y considering dropping out are falling behind and feeling like they couldn ‘t catch up and not seeing how the work they were doing would help them in life. MNTHS ‘10-‘11 20% Why did you consider dropping out of school?1 MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Note: Scale Median School ends at 20% Median NewTech School Percent of MNTHS students in ‘10-‘11 who have 15% considered dropping out ents Percent of MNTHS students in ‘09 ‘10 09- 10 rcent of Responde 16% who had considered dropping out Percent of students who have 10% considered dropping 16% 8% out at the median ons school 7% dent Perceptio Percent of students P t f t d t Per who have 6% 6% 6% 6% considered dropping 16% 5% 5% 5% 5% out at the median 5% 5% NewTech school 5% 4% 4% 4% 4% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 2% 2% hemes of Stud 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 0% I had fallen I didn ‘t see I had I needed to I had I didn ‘t feel I was I failed I didn ‘t feel I didn ‘t feel Other2 behind and how the work personal work and problems like anyone discouraged state or safe safe goingIII. Th felt like I I was doing problems at make money with other cared if I by an adult(s) standardized at school to and from couldn ‘t would help home students2 stayed in at school tests school catch up me in life school 1: Includes data from 43 MNTHS students who responded Yes ‘ to the question, “Have you ever seriously considered dropping out of high school?” Students were asked to check all reasons that apply.32 2: Comments included in Other ‘ category are provided in Student Comments Table. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 34. Beneficiary Perception Considered Dropping Out of School (2) Report Why did you consider dropping out of school?1 20% Note: Scale ends at 20% Freshmen 11% By grade level, percent of Sophomores 16% students who have considered Juniors 14% dropping out Seniors 16% Percent of Respondents 10% ns emes of Stude Perception 8% 9% 9% 8% 6% 6% 5% 6% 6% 5% 5% 5% ent 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 3% 3% 3% 3% 2% 2% 2% 2% 1% 1% 2% 1% 1% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% I had fallen I didn ‘t see ad a e dd t I had ad I needed to eeded I had ad I didn ‘t feel d d t ee I was as I failed a ed I didn ‘t feel d d t ee I didn ‘t feel d d t ee Ot e OtherIII. The behind and how the work personal work and problems like anyone discouraged state or safe safe going felt like I I was doing problems at make money with other cared if I by an adult(s) standardized at school to and from couldn ‘t would help home students stayed in at school tests school catch up me in life school 1: Includes data from 43 MNTHS students who responded Yes ‘ to the question, “Have you ever seriously considered dropping out of high school?”33 Students were asked to check all reasons that apply. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 35. Beneficiary Perception Contents Report I. Introduction 2 II. Executive Summary and Overall Items 7 III. Themes of Student Perceptions a) ) Relationships with Teachers p 12 b) School Culture and Attitudes 19 c) Future Goals and Aspirations 24 d) Life Outside of High School 35 e) Rigor of Classes and Instruction 40 IV. Assessment of School Support Services 57 ns V. V Summary of Qualitative Feedback 62 emes of Stude Perception VI. Review of Findings and Areas for Discussion 67 VII. Student Demographics and School Resources 74 ent VIII. VIII Appendix 86III. The34 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 36. Beneficiary Perception Life Outside of High School Report The Discussion Outside of School summary measure describes the extent to which adults outside of school are talking with students about their academic work and future.  MNTHS is rated higher than the median school on this measure.  MNTHS is rated higher than the median NewTech school on this measure. Discussion Outside of School Summary Measure More 5.0 frequent NewTech Grade Level Schools Survey Questions Included in Summary Measure In the past year, how often has an adult outside of school talked to you about the importance of college? In the past year, how often has an adult outside of school talked to you about how you are doing in 4.0 Top of your classes? range ns emes of Stude Perception In the past year, how often has an adult outside of school talked to you about ways to pay for 75th percentile college? 50th percentile (median) MNTHS ‘10-‘11 25th percentile ent MNTHS ‘09-‘10 3.0 Median NewTech Bottom of School range Range of NewTech SchoolsIII. The Freshmen MNTHS Grade e Sophomores Level 1=Less Juniors frequent Seniors 2.0 Note: Scale ends at 2.035 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 37. Beneficiary Perception Life Outside of High School Report Average Rating Items Included In 1=Never, 2=Rarely, 3=Sometimes, 4=Frequently, Summary Measure 5 Very 5=Very frequently 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 In the past year, how often has an adult outside of school talked to you about the importance of college? In the past year, how often has p y , ns emes of Stude Perception an adult outside of school talked to you about how you are doing in your classes? ent In the past year, how often has an adult outside of school talked to you about ways to pay for college?III. The Note: Scales end at 2 0 2.0 Full range Middle fifty Median Range of Median MNTHS MNTHS of school percent of school NewTech NewTech Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors School ‘10-‘11 ‘09-‘10 avg. ratings avg. ratings School Schools36 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 38. Beneficiary Perception Obstacles to Best Performance in School (1) Report Compared to the proportion at the median school, a smaller proportion of MNTHS students report home life as an obstacle that makes it hard for them to do their best in school, while a smaller proportion report their p p p extracurricular commitments as an obstacle. Note: Scale 40% Do any of the following make it hard for you to do your best in school?1 ends at 40% 37% MNTHS ‘10-‘11 34% MNTHS ‘09-‘10 09- 10 34% Median School Median NewTech School 30% 27% ts 26% Percent of All Respondent 25% 21% 20% ns o % 17% emes of Stude Perception 16% 16% 14% 14% 14% 13%13%12% 12% 11% 11% 10% 10% 10% 10% ent 8% 9% 8% 8% 8% 8% 6% 6% 5% 5% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 3% 3% 2% 2% 0%III. The Home life My Family Relationship My own After-school Getting Crime and Use of drugs Crime and Other extracurricular responsibilities with mental job picked on violence and/or alcohol violence in commitments (including my boyfriend or health outside school school own kid(s)) girlfriend 1: Students were asked to check all reasons that apply; 37 percent of students indicated that there were no significant obstacles that make it difficult for them to do their best in school.37 2: Comments included in Other ‘ category are provided in Student Comments table. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 39. Beneficiary Perception Obstacles to Best Performance in School (2) Report Do any of the following make it hard for you to do your best in school? 1 50% Freshmen Note: Scale ends at 40% Sophomores Juniors Seniors 40% 37% 32% Percent of All Respondents 30% 29% 29% 25% 24% ns emes of Stude Perception 20% 20% 19% 19% 16% 16% 14% 14% 14% 13% 12% ent 11% 10% 10% 10% 10% 9% 9% 9% 7% 7% 7% 6% 6% 6% 6% 6% 5% 4% 3% 3% 2% 2% 1% 2% 1% 2% 2% 0% 0%III. The 0% Home life My Family Relationship My own After-school Getting Crime and Use of drugs Crime and Other extracurricular responsibilities with mental job picked on violence and/or alcohol violence in commitments (including my boyfriend or health outside school school own kid(s)) girlfriend 1: Students were asked to check all reasons that apply; 37 percent of students indicated that there were no significant obstacles that make it difficult for them to do their best in school.38 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 40. Beneficiary Perception Contents Report I. Introduction 2 II. Executive Summary and Overall Items 7 III. Themes of Student Perceptions a) ) Relationships with Teachers p 12 b) School Culture and Attitudes 19 c) Future Goals and Aspirations 24 d) Life Outside of High School 35 e) Rigor of Classes and Instruction 40 IV. Assessment of School Support Services 57 ns V. V Summary of Qualitative Feedback 62 emes of Stude Perception VI. Review of Findings and Areas for Discussion 67 VII. Student Demographics and School Resources 74 ent VIII. VIII Appendix 86III. The39 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 41. Beneficiary Perception Rigor of Classes and Instruction Report The Rigorous Instruction summary measure describes the degree to which students feel challenged to work hard, think critically in their classes, and believe that their teachers contribute to their learning.  MNTHS is rated higher than the median school on this measure.  MNTHS is rated higher than the median NewTech school on this measure. Rigorous Instruction Summary Measure More rigorous 5.0 NewTech Grade Level Schools Survey Questions Included in Summary Measure In order to receive a good grade, I have to work hard i h d in my classes. l Top of The work that I do for my classes makes me range really think. Teachers understand the subjects that they are teaching. ns 75th percentile emes of Stude Perception Teachers assign homework that helps students to better understand the subject. 4.0 50th percentile (median) 25th percentile ent MNTHS ‘10-‘11 MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Median NewTech Bottom of School range Range of NewTech SchoolsIII. The Freshmen MNTHS Grade Sophomores Level 1 = Less Juniors rigorous 3.0 Seniors Note: Scale ends at 3.040 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 42. Beneficiary Perception Rigor of Classes and Instruction Report Average Rating Items Included in It I l d di 1=Strongly disagree, 2=Somewhat disagree, Summary Measure 3=Neither agree nor disagree, 4=Somewhat agree, 5=Strongly agree 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 In order to receive a good grade, I have to work hard in my classes. MNTHS ‘09-‘10 overlaps Median NewTech School. The work that I do for my classes makes me really think. ns emes of Stude Perception Teachers understand the subjects that they are teaching. ent Teachers assign homework that helps students to better understand the subject.III. The Note: Scales end at 2.0. Full range Middle fifty Median Range of Median MNTHS MNTHS of school percent of school NewTech NewTech Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors School ‘10-‘11 ‘09-‘10 avg. ratings avg. ratings School Schools41 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 43. Beneficiary Perception Teachers ‘ Expectations and Relevance of Curriculum Report On the measure of whether students agree that their On the measure of whether students agree that their teachers ‘ expectations make them want to do their best, class work helps them outside of school, MNTHS is MNTHS is rated: rated:  Higher than the median school  Higher than the median school  Higher than the median NewTech school  Higher than the median NewTech school My teachers ‘ expectations make What I learn in class helps me outside of Strongly me want to do my best y Strongly school agree 5.0 agree 5.0 NewTech Grade Level NewTech Grade Level Schools Schools Top of Top of range range Somewhat Seniors overlap Freshmen and Juniors. Somewhat agree 4.0 agree 4.0 Sophomores overlaps Freshmen. 75th percentile 75th percentile ns 50th percentile pe ce t e emes of Stude Perception 50th percentile 1-5 Scale 1-5 Scale (median) (median) 25th percentile 25th percentile MNTHS ‘10-‘11 ent Neither Neither 3.0 30 MNTHS ‘09-‘10 agree nor 3.0 30 agree nor disagree Bottom of disagree Bottom of range Median range NewTech School Range of NewTech Schools Freshmen adeIII. The MNTHS Gra Sophomores Level Juniors Somewhat Somewhat disagree 2.0 disagree 2.0 Seniors Note: Scale ends at 2.0 Note: Scale ends at 2.0 1=Strongly disagree 1=Strongly disagree42 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 44. Beneficiary Perception Time Preparing Outside of Class (1) Report The proportion of MNTHS students who spend more than one hour each day on homework for their classes is:  Similar to that of the average school  Similar to that of the average NewTech school How much time each day do you typically spend on homework for all your classes? 100% More than 3 hours 2 hours-3 hours 80% 1.5 hours 2 hours hours-2 pondents 1 hour-1.5 hours 60% ns Percent of Resp emes of Stude Perception 30 minutes- 40% 1 hour ent 20% Less than 30 minutesIII. The None 0% MNTHS ‘10-‘11 MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Average School Average NewTech School43 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 45. Beneficiary Perception Time Preparing Outside of Class (2) Report How much time each day do you typically spend on homework for all your classes? 100% More than 3 hours 2 hours-3 hours 80% 1.5 hours-2 hours 1 hour-1.5 hours pondents 60% ns Percent of Resp emes of Stude Perception 30 minutes- 1 hour 40% ent 20% Less than 30 minutesIII. The None 0% Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors44 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 46. Beneficiary Perception What Students Are Saying… Report Below are selected student comments related to the theme of Rigor of Classes and Instruction. For a full list of comments, please see your Student Comments Table. Selected Comments – Rigor of Classes and Instruction  “Since my classes are challenging, I am more engaged and am more dedicated in studying and seeking help; I have a better overall experience when I ‘m in classes that are challenging and interesting.”  “We don ‘t actually choose our own electives. It would be cool that, when we have all the classes we need to get our credits, if there are extra classes we could take to fill in the periods, that WE get to choose from, so we are more comfortable and not just placed somewhere.”  “These challenging classes help me be prepared for what college is going to be like or at least a ns These emes of Stude Perception taste of it and helps me strive to do my best.”  “I would love a study hall where we can work on projects, consult with teachers, study for tests, work on homework, and collaborate with peers. I think this would be a great thing at the ent beginning of the day” day  “Many times, I have wished for a time in the school day that we could dedicate to finishing assignments and getting focused and school matters. At school, I would be able to talk to teammates and wont have the distractions I get at home.”III. The45 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 47. Beneficiary Perception Rigor of Classes and Instruction – English Report On the measure of whether students have to work hard On the measure of whether students feel that the work they in order to receive a good grade in their English class, do in their English class makes them really think, MNTHS is MNTHS is rated: rated:  Similar to the median school  Higher than the median school  Higher than the median NewTech school  Higher than the median NewTech school In order to receive a good grade, I have The work that I do for my English class makes to work hard in my English class me really think Strongly 5.0 Strongly 5.0 agree NewTech Grade Level agree NewTech Grade Level Schools Schools Top of 1-5 Scale 1-5 Scale e range Top of range 75th percentile 50th percentile ns ( (median)) 75th percentile emes of Stude Perception 25th percentile Somewhat Somewhat agree 4.0 agree 4.0 50th percentile MNTHS ‘10-‘11 (median) MNTHS ‘09-‘10 25th percentile ent Median NewTech Bottom of range School Range of NewTech Schools Bottom of Freshmen MNTH Grade range Sophomores Level HSIII. The L Juniors J i Seniors Neither Neither agree nor agree nor disagree 3.0 Note: Scale ends at 3.0 disagree 3.0 Note: Scale ends at 3.0 1=Strongly disagree; 2=Somewhat disagree 1=Strongly disagree; 2=Somewhat disagree46 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 48. Beneficiary Perception Rigor of Classes and Instruction – English Report On the measure of whether English teachers understand On the measure of whether English teachers assign the subject that they are teaching, MNTHS is rated: homework that helps increase students ‘ understanding of  Similar to the median school the subject, MNTHS is rated:  Higher than the median NewTech school  Similar to the median school  Higher than the median NewTech school My English teacher understands the My English teacher assigns homework that helps subject that he or she is teaching bj t th t h h i t hi me t better understand the subject to b tt d t d th bj t Strongly Strongly agree 5.0 agree 5.0 NewTech Schools Grade Level NewTech Schools Grade Level Top of range 75th percentile Top of MNTHS ‘10-‘11 overlaps range MNTHS ‘09-‘10. 50th percentile (median) Somewhat 25th percentile Somewhat 75th percentile agree 4.0 Seniors overlaps Juniors. agree 4.0 Juniors overlaps Freshmen. MNTHS ‘09-‘10 overlaps 50th percentile ns Median NewTech School. emes of Stude Perception 1-5 Scale 1-5 Scale (median) 25th percentile Seniors overlaps Sophomores. MNTHS ‘10-‘11 MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Bottom of range ent Neither Median Neither agree nor 3.0 NewTech agree nor 3.0 disagree School disagree Range of NewTech Bottom of Schools range Freshmen MNTHS Grade Sophomores velIII. The Lev Juniors Seniors Somewhat Somewhat disagree 2.0 disagree 2.0 Note: Scale ends at 2.0 Note: Scale ends at 2.0 1=Strongly disagree 1=Strongly disagree47 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 49. Beneficiary Perception Time Spent Outside of Class – English (1) Report The proportion of MNTHS students who spend more than one hour each day on homework for English class is:  Similar to that of the average school  Similar to that of the average NewTech school How much time each day do you typically spend on homework for your English class? More than 100% 3hhours 2 hours- 1.5 hours-2 hours 3 hours 1 hour-1.5 hours 80% 30 minutes- pondents 60% 1 hour ns Percent of Resp emes of Stude Perception 40% Less than ent 30 minutes 20% NoneIII. The 0% MNTHS ‘10-‘11 MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Average School Average NewTech School48 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 50. Beneficiary Perception Time Spent Outside of Class – English (2) Report How much time each day do you typically spend on homework for your English class? 100% More than 3 hours 2 hours-3 hours 1.5 hours-2 hours 80% 1 hour-1.5 hours pondents 30 minutes- 60% 1 hour ns Percent of Resp emes of Stude Perception 40% Less than ent 30 minutes i t 20%III. The None 0% Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors49 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 51. Beneficiary Perception Rigor of Classes and Instruction – Math Report On the measure of whether students have to work hard On the measure of whether students feel that the work in order to receive a good grade in their math class, they do in their math class makes them really think, MNTHS is rated: MNTHS is rated:  Higher than the median school  Higher than the median school  Higher than the median NewTech school  Higher than the median NewTech school In order to receive a good grade, I have The work that I do for my math class makes me to work hard in my math class really think Strongly Strongly agree 5.0 agree 5.0 NewTech Grade Level NewTech Grade Level Schools Schools Top of Top of range range 1-5 Scale 1-5 Scale e 75th percentile 50th percentile 75th percentile MNTHS ‘09-‘10 overlaps (median) Median NewTech School. 50th percentile ns emes of Stude Perception 25th percentile (median) Seniors overlaps Sophomores. Somewhat Somewhat 4.0 4.0 agree agree 25th percentile MNTHS ‘10-‘11 MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Bottom of range ent Median NewTech Bottom of School Range of range NewTech Schools Freshmen MNTHS Grade Sophomores evelIII. The S Le Juniors Seniors Neither Neither agree nor agree nor disagree 3.0 Note: Scale ends at 3.0 disagree 3.0 Note: Scale ends at 3.0 1=Strongly disagree; 2=Somewhat disagree 1=Strongly disagree; 2=Somewhat disagree50 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 52. Beneficiary Perception Rigor of Classes and Instruction – Math Report On the measure of whether math teachers understand On the measure of whether math teachers assign the subject that they are teaching, MNTHS is rated: homework that helps increase students ‘ understanding of  Similar to the median school the subject, MNTHS is rated:  Similar to the median NewTech school  Similar to the median school  Similar to the median NewTech school My math teacher understands the My math teacher assigns homework that helps subject that he or she is teaching bj t th t h h i t hi me t better understand the subject to b tt d t d th bj t Strongly Strongly agree 5.0 agree 5.0 NewTech Grade Level NewTech Grade Level Schools Top of Schools range Top of range MNTHS ‘10-‘11 overlaps 75th percentile Median NewTech School. 50th percentile 75th percentile (median) Somewhat Somewhat agree 4.0 agree 4.0 50th percentile 25th percentile (median) ns emes of Stude Perception 1-5 Scale 1-5 Scale 25th percentile MNTHS ‘10-‘11 MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Median Bottom of Bottom of range ent NewTech range Neither School S h l Neither agree nor 3.0 Range of agree nor 3.0 disagree disagree NewTech Schools Freshmen NTHS Grade Sophomores Level JuniorsIII. The MN Seniors Somewhat Somewhat disagree 2.0 disagree 2.0 Note: Scale ends at 2.0 Note: Scale ends at 2.0 1=Strongly disagree 1=Strongly disagree51 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 53. Beneficiary Perception Time Spent Outside of Class – Math (1) Report The proportion of MNTHS students who spend more than one hour each day on homework for math class is:  Similar to that of the average school g  Similar to that of the average NewTech school How much time each day do you typically spend on homework for your math class? More than 100% 3hhours 2 hours-3 1.5 hours-2 hours hours 80% 1 hour-1.5 hours pondents 60% 30 minutes- 1 hour ns Percent of Resp emes of Stude Perception 40% ent Less than 30 minutes 20%III. The None N 0% MNTHS ‘10-‘11 MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Average School Average NewTech School52 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 54. Beneficiary Perception Time Spent Outside of Class – Math (2) Report How much time each day do you typically spend on homework for your math class? More than 100% 3hhours 2 hours-3 hours 1.5 hours-2 hours 80% 1 hour-1.5 hours 30 minutes- pondents 1 hour 60% ns Percent of Resp emes of Stude Perception 40% Less than 30 minutes ent 20% NoneIII. The 0% Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors53 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 55. Beneficiary Perception Working In Group Projects Report Students at MNTHS have participated in hands-on group projects during this school year more frequently compared to students at the average New Tech school. p g “During this school year, how often have you participated in hands-on group projects?” 100% 80% 5 = Very frequently spondents 60% Average Ratings ns Freshmen 4.5 45 Percent of Res emes of Stude Perception Sophomores 4.3 40% Juniors 4.7 4 = Frequently Seniors 4.4 ent 20% 3 = Sometimes 2 = RarelyIII. The 0% 1 = Never MNTHS Average of New Tech Schools Average Ratings 4.5 4.3 Note: Comparative data from the full YouthTruth dataset is not available because this question was asked only of54 students at New Tech Network. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy  2/10/2011
  • 56. Beneficiary Perception Working On Interesting Projects Report Students at MNTHS agree more strongly than students at the average New Tech school that most projects in their core-subject classes are interesting. j g “Most projects I do in core-subject classes (math/science/English/social studies) are interesting.” 100% 5 = Strongly agree 80% spondents 60% 4 Average Ratings ns Freshmen 4.2 42 Percent of Res emes of Stude Perception Sophomores 3.6 40% Juniors 4.0 Seniors 3.7 ent 3 20% 2 1 = StronglyIII. The disagree di 0% MNTHS Average of New Tech Schools Average Ratings 3.9 3.7 Note: Comparative data from the full YouthTruth dataset is not available because this question was asked only of55 students at New Tech Network. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy  2/10/2011
  • 57. Beneficiary Perception Contents Report I. Introduction 2 II. Executive Summary and Overall Items 7 III. Themes of Student Perceptions a) ) Relationships with Teachers p 12 b) School Culture and Attitudes 19 c) Future Goals and Aspirations 24 d) Life Outside of High School 35IV. Assessment of School Suppo Services e) Rigor of Classes and Instruction 40 IV. Assessment of School Support Services 57 ort V. V Summary of Qualitative Feedback 62 VI. Review of Findings and Areas for Discussion 67 VII. Student Demographics and School Resources 74 VIII. VIII Appendix 8656 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 58. Beneficiary Perception Support Services – General (1) Report Compared to the proportion at the median school, a larger proportion of MNTHS students report participating in advisory classes. However, students at MNTHS find advisory classes less helpful than do students at the median high school. They also find access to the internet more helpful than do students at the median high school Use and Helpfulness of School Support Services1 Very 160% 5 helpful MNTHS ‘10-‘11 MNTHS ‘09-‘10 4.5 4.5 Median School 4.4 4.4 140% Median NewTech 4.3 4.2 4.2 4.2 School 4.1 4.1 4.1 4.1 4.1 4.1 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.9 Somewhat 120% 4 3.8 helpful 3.6 3.6 ing 3.4 34 Average Helpfulness Rati 100%IV. Assessment of School Suppo Services cent of Students Participating in 87% 87% 86% 88% (Symbols) 84% 83% Neither 80% 3 helpful nor Support Service (Bars) 75% unhelpful ort e e P 60% 47% 45% 44% 40% 34% 38% 2 Somewhat 32% 31% 32% unhelpful 30% 28% 28% 28% 27% 26% Perc 24% 22% 22% 21% 21% 19% 20% 18% Very 0% 1 unhelpful Access to the Help choosing One on one One-on-one After school After school Classes on Advisory internet classes to meet tutoring with a tutoring program make-up classes how to study classes graduation teacher or adult requirements 1: Students were specifically asked to rate how helpful these services have been for them on a scale from one to five. Ratings are not shown when fewer than57 five students responded to the question. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 59. Beneficiary Perception Support Services – General (2) Report Use and Helpfulness of School Support Services1 Very 180% Freshmen 5 helpful Sophomores 4.6 4.6 4.5 160% Juniors 4.4 4.4 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.3 Seniors 4.2 4.2 4.2 4.1 4.1 140% 4.0 4.0 4.0 Somewhat 3.8 3.8 3.8 4 helpful 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.6 120% Average Helpfulness Rating gIV. Assessment of School Suppo Services 3.4 3.2 Percent of Students Participating in 100% Symbols) 93% 90% 90%90% Neither 85% 3 helpful nor Bars) 84% 84% ort 82% unhelpful (S 80% Support Service (B H 60% 56% 50% 48% 46% 44% 44% 43% 39% 39%39% 2 Somewhat 40% unhelpful p S 33% 30% 28% 24% 22% 22% 18% 1 1 6% 8% 20% 13% Very 0% 1 unhelpful nhelpf l Access to the Help choosing One-on-one After school After school Classes on Advisory internet classes to meet tutoring with a tutoring program make-up classes how to study classes graduation teacher or adult requirements58 1: Ratings are not shown when fewer than five students responded to the question. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 60. Beneficiary Perception Support Services – Post-Graduation Goals (1) Report Compared to the proportion at the median school, a larger proportion of MNTHS students report receiving college entrance exam p p g preparation, while a smaller p p proportion report receiving counseling about future career p g g possibilities. Use and Helpfulness of School Support Services1 Very 140% MNTHS ‘10-‘11 5 helpful MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Median School Median NewTech 120% School 4.1 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.9 4 Somewhat helpful 100% 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 elpfulness Rating 3.5 3.5IV. Assessment of School Suppo Services cipating in 80% ymbols) Neither 3 helpful nor ort ars) unhelpful (Sy upport Service (Ba Percent of Students Partic Average He 58% 60% 53% 48% 45% 42% 40% 36% 36% 2 Somewhat 34% 34% 33% 32% 32% Su 28% unhelpful h l f l 26% 23% 23% 20% 19% 18% 20% 13% Very 0% 1 unhelpful College entrance Counseling about future Counseling about Counseling about how Counseling on how exam preparation career possibilities admissions requirements to apply to college2 to pay for college 1: Students were specifically asked to rate how helpful these services have been for them on a scale from one59 to five. Ratings are not shown when fewer than five students responded to the question. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 61. Beneficiary Perception Support Services – Post-Graduation Goals (2) Report Freshmen Use and Helpfulness of School Support Services1 Sophomores Juniors Very 180% 5 helpful Seniors 4.5 4.5 160% 4.4 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.2 4.1 4.1 4.1 4.1 140% 3.9 3.9 3.8 4 Somewhat helpfulIV. Assessment of School Suppo Services 120% pfulness Rating 3.5 3.4 3.3 Percent of Students Participating in 100% mbols) Neither ort 87% 2.9 3 helpful nor p s) (Sym 84% Average Help Supp Service (Bars 2.8 28 77% unhelpful 80% 71% 67% 58% 60% port 49% Somewhat 2 40% unhelpful 34% 33% 26% 25% 26% 27% 26% 22% 18% 17% 20% 12% 13% 13% Very 0% 1 unhelpful College entrance Counseling about future Counseling about Counseling about how Counseling on how exam preparation career possibilities admissions requirements to apply to college to pay for college60 1: Ratings are not shown when fewer than five students responded to the question. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 62. Beneficiary Perception Contents Report I. Introduction 2 II. Executive Summary and Overall Items 7 III. Themes of Student Perceptions a) ) Relationships with Teachers p 12 b) School Culture and Attitudes 19 c) Future Goals and Aspirations 24 d) Life Outside of High School 35 e) Rigor of Classes and Instruction 40 IV. Assessment of School Support Services 57 ack V. V Summary of Qualitative Feedback 62 litative Feedba VI. Review of Findings and Areas for Discussion 67 VII. Student Demographics and School Resources 74 VIII. VIII Appendix 86 mmary of QualV. Sum61 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 63. Beneficiary Perception Summary of Qualitative Feedback – Strengths Report Students provided qualitative feedback, detailing the most important thing their school provides to help them do their best in class. Comments were categorized by students; specific themes based on responses from 298 students are shown below. Distributions of responses are shown f MNTHS, the average school, and the average NewTech school. f h for MNTHS th h l d th N T h h l “What is the most important thing that your school provides to help you do your best in class?” 1 % Student Comments at Most Frequently Mentioned % Student Comments % Student Comments at 2 the Average NewTech Strengths at MNTHS the Average School School Positive 20% 11% 16% Culture/Extracurriculars Smaller Classes/Personalized 16% 15% 14% Extra Help Prepare Me for my Academic 12% 10% 10% Future Good Teachers 7% 7% 6% ack Interesting/Relevant g litative Feedba 7% 6% 7% Instruction Learning Supports 6% 5% 4% Course Selection 6% 8% 6% Supportive 4% 9% 8% Teachers/Administrators mmary of Qual Use of Class Time 3% 5% 5% High Expectations 3% 8% 7% Effective Classroom 3% 3% 3% Management and Discipline Other 4% 3% 4%V. Sum Not sure/Nothing/Not helpful 8% 12% 9% 1: Proportions may not sum to 100 percent due to rounding. 2: Due to changes in the survey instrument, this chart only includes comparative data for the 54 schools that62 participated in the November 2010 round. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 64. Beneficiary Perception One Way This School Helps Me Do My Best… Report Students at MNTHS were asked to describe the most important thing that MNTHS provides to help them do their best in class. The chart below shows the five categories that are most frequently mentioned as a strength of MNTHS. g q y g % Student Most % Student Comments Frequently MNTHS Comments Included in this Topic Comments at the Mentioned at MNTHS Average g Strengths School1 “New Tech culture helps me in the class room because of how I can work with others and show my best without worry. Our culture helps me focus more on what ‘s inside the classroom compared to factors Positive including fear for my physical being.” “The culture here lets me be free of most rules. People wont bother Culture/ you or pick fights with you. Everyone is here for the same thing and that ‘s to get an education.” 20% 11% “Because you don ‘t have to worry about things like your safety and safety of your belongings, it relieves Extracurriculars you of some stresses you would have at other schools ” “If we wanna give up the teachers and students schools. If wont let us because of our culture. If it was negative we would not try in school and fail.” “Here at New Tech, I feel like the teachers are actually knowledgeable about what they teach me, and Smaller they care about me getting my work done on time and correctly. They encourage me to ask a lot of Classes/ questions to really understand what I ‘m learning.” “When I don ‘t get all my work done I can stay after Personalized school and the teachers put up with everyone during and after school so its a real big help.” “When I ‘m 16% 15% ack struggling in a class, all it takes is a short workshop with my teacher to help me back on task. One on Extra Help litative Feedba one tutoring is available often.” “In all of the schools that I have attended I have always never really had much of a challenge…. This Prepare Me for school is different. It provides me with a challenge. I really can learn new things in this environment. It gives me a taste of what a higher education will be like.” “Having classes that are challenging helps you my Academic focus on your career and when you get to do the career your used to the amount of knowledge it takes 12% 10% Future to follow your dream.” “Receiving the challenge of higher level learning at an earlier age helps prepare you for the work load and intensity of college ” college. mmary of Qual “I think that one of the things that help me learn in this school is the way that teachers help out and push you to do the work.” “[Our teachers] make sure we understand the content they are teaching. They are Good Teachers willing to take time out of their days to make sure you understand it to the fullest extent.” “They teach me 7% 7% what I need to learn in a correct manner and aren ‘t wrong about what they are teaching me. Which greatly helps me when I ‘m learning”V. Sum “Having interesting classes helps me because it keeps me interested in what we ‘re learning and it also Having re Interesting/ helps with things that I ACTUALLY need to know outside of school.” “By being interested in the classes it Relevant allows me to be more focused and into the work providing a better product.” “When the subject is 7% 6% interesting, I, personally, get more into the project. Usually I also end up remembering the things we Instruction learned.” 1: Due to changes in the survey instrument, this chart only includes comparative data for the 54 schools that63 participated in the November 2010 round. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 65. Beneficiary Perception Summary of Qualitative Feedback – Weaknesses Report Students provided qualitative feedback, detailing the most important thing their school could change to help them do their best in class. Comments were categorized by students; specific themes based on responses from 298 students are shown below. Distributions of responses are shown for MNTHS, the average school, and the average N T h school. Di t ib ti f h f MNTHS th h l d th NewTech h l “What is the most important thing that your school could change to help you do your best in class?” 1 % Student % Student Comments Most Frequently Mentioned % Student Comments C Comments at at the Average g Weaknesses W k at the Average S h l2 t th A School MNTHS NewTech School More Course Selection 16% 9% 9% Student Attitudes 12% 14% 16% More Time to Do Work 10% 6% 7% More Personalized Attention 10% 7% 7% Extracurriculars and Involvement 9% 7% 7% With Other Schools Better Teachers 8% 12% 12% ack Varied Instruction/Relevant Work 8% 7% 7% litative Feedba More Learning Supports 4% 3% 2% Prepare Me for My Future 4% 4% 4% Attitude Towards Students 3% 6% 5% Higher Expectations/Keep Me On g p p 3% 5% 4% mmary of Qual Track Better Policies 2% 6% 5% Facilities and Resources 2% 3% 2% Other 1% 3% 3%V. Sum Not sure/Nothing/No change 10% 9% 10% 1: Proportions may not sum to 100 percent due to rounding. 2: Due to changes in the survey instrument, this chart only includes comparative data for the 54 schools that64 participated in the November 2010 round. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 66. Beneficiary Perception One Thing This School Could Do Better… Report Students at MNTHS were asked to describe the most important thing that MNTHS could change to help them do their best in class. The chart below shows the four categories that are most frequently mentioned as a weakness of MNTHS. g q y % Student Most % Student Comments Frequently MNTHS Comments Included in this Topic Comments at the Mentioned at MNTHS Average Weaknesses School1 “We only have certain number of electives, and being a senior I have run out of classes to take. I do not think that is a good quality of a high school trying to prepare you for the outside world.” “I would like to have more varieties of electives because we don ‘t have many electives at Manor New Tech. I would like to expand my culture and social skills by having more choice of different electives.” “Having more More Course options would probably help us to know what we like and don ‘t like to take in consideration when we 16% 9% Selection decide what we want to do with our future.” “It ‘s just annoying to have such limited opportunities.” “The electives ‘ aren ‘t really elective. The school forces us to have engineering, architecture, digital literacy…. I think they should give us more options like home economics or art. Things that we might actually want to take.” “I believe that the only real issue are school sometimes faces is student behavior.” “Many students don ‘t ack want to be here as much as some other students and are just wasting their time and distracting others.” “There ‘s alot of students that act like they don ‘t care and they are very disruptive, so it distracts me and There s t disruptive litative Feedba Student I don ‘t get to learn/hear what I need to know.” “Less distractions will result in more learning time.” “I 12% 14% Attitudes think if we would have fewer students that distract others around them, then other students and I would have a better environment to learn.” “Improving the attitudes of some of my fellows would help me by giving me more motivated people to work with.” “Some students don ‘t have computers at home or just don ‘t have what they need in order to do their assigned work and some students can ‘t come in before or after school so they don ‘t have time outside mmary of Qual of school to finish their work. If we had a study hall class period during school it would allow some More Time to students to be able to do their assigned work during school.” “We need a study hall so we can finish our 10% 6% Do Work work outside classroom and we can help other people in that study hall.” “Having a small time period during the day would give me time to catch up on things I am behind in or to get extra help in any subject that I may need it. I honestly think that it would help improve my grades a little” “It would give me more of a chance to understand the topic I learn better when things are explained toV. Sum More me one on one and when I get to ask questions with the teacher just talking to me ” “Here at our school me. Here teachers do help us with our work but for the most part it ‘s independent work. If teachers can help a little Personalized more than I believe it will create a better learning environment and not leave anyone behind.” “A lot of 10% 7% Attention times students who are struggling get frustrated. If the teacher would offer to explain it until the student gets it, the student will be more likely to learn.” 1: Due to changes in the survey instrument, this chart only includes comparative data for the 54 schools that65 participated in the November 2010 round. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 67. Beneficiary Perception Contents Report I. Introduction 2 II. Executive Summary and Overall Items 7 III. Themes of Student Perceptions a) ) Relationships with Teachers p 12 b) School Culture and Attitudes 19 c) Future Goals and Aspirations 24 d) Life Outside of High School 35 on view of Findin and Areas for Discussio e) Rigor of Classes and Instruction 40 IV. Assessment of School Support Services 57 V. V Summary of Qualitative Feedback 62 VI. Review of Findings and Areas for Discussion 67 VII. Student Demographics and School Resources 74 ngs VIII. VIII Appendix 86VI. Rev66 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 68. Beneficiary Perception Review of Findings (1) Report Chart shows the percentile rank of MNTHS ( ), MNTHS in ‘09-‘10 ( ), and the median school in NewTech ( ) compared to all schools on selected measures. p Percentile Rank Key Measures Description of Key Measures 0th 25th 50th 75th 100th Describes the degree to which students agree that they Options After Graduation will have more options after graduation because of what their school has done for them Describes the degree to which students believe they are Quality of Education receiving a high-quality education on view of Findin and Areas for Discussio Topic: Quality of teachers support – academic and Relationships with personal; Teacher personal attention; Perceptions of Teachers Summary teachers ‘ efforts to push students and provide them Measure with necessary structures for advancing School Culture Summary Topic: School-wide culture that fosters respect and Measure fairness Goals and Aspirations Topic: Communication with an adult in school about one ngs Summary Measure ‘s academic future; Future orientation of the school Topic: Communication about students ‘ future with an Discussion Outside of adult outside of school; External adult support and School Summary Measure involvementVI. Rev Rigorous Instruction Topic: Rigor of classroom work and instruction Summary Measure67 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 69. Beneficiary Perception Review of Findings (2) Report Chart shows the percentile rank of MNTHS ‘s Freshmen ( ), Sophomores ( ), Juniors ( ), and Seniors ( ) among all schools in the comparative set. Percentile Rank Key Measures Description of Key Measures 0th 25th 50th 75th 100th Describes th d D ib the degree t which students agree th t th to hi h t d t that they Options After Graduation will have more options after graduation because of what Sophomores overlaps Freshmen. their school has done for them Describes the degree to which students believe they are Quality of Education receiving a high-quality education on view of Findin and Areas for Discussio Topic: Quality of teachers support – academic and Relationships with personal; Teacher personal attention; Perceptions of Teachers Summary teachers ‘ efforts to push students and provide them Measure with necessary structures for advancing School Culture Summary Topic: School-wide culture that fosters respect and Measure fairness Goals and Aspirations Topic: Communication with an adult in school about one ngs Summary Measure ‘s academic future; Future orientation of the school ; Topic: Communication about students ‘ future with an Discussion Outside of adult outside of school; External adult support and School Summary Measure involvementVI. Rev Rigorous Instruction Topic: Rigor of classroom work and instruction Summary Measure68 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 70. Beneficiary Perception Areas for Discussion (1) Report In the following section, CEP summarizes particular areas in which your school had distinctive results – either p positively or negatively – compared to other participating schools. We encourage you to use this section to help y g y p p p g g y p understand the pattern of results across students within your school. We end each issue area with some discussion questions for you to consider. Positive Relationships with Teachers Overall, MNTHS students rate their relationships with teachers in school more positively than the typical school that has participated in YouthTruth, and higher than MNTHS ‘09-‘10 students. Compared to students at the typical school, students at MNTHS indicate that more of their teachers try to be fair, make connections between what they are learning in class to life outside of the classroom, and make an effort to understand what their life is like outside of school. In their comments, students frequently describe supportive teachers that want to see students succeed. One student says, “If I on view of Findin and Areas for Discussio do not understand the work in class, the teachers would stay after or come before school to help make sure that students are all caught up on the work,” and another states, “No matter what question I have, teachers will answer anything. Even when I need help with my homework, I can email them and they will respond.” MNTHS students also more strongly agree than typical that there is at least one teacher who would write them a recommendation for a job, program, scholarship, or college, and that their teachers ‘ expectations make them want to do their best.  What may have changed since last year that has led to more positive student perceptions of their relationships with teachers, particularly teachers ‘ effort to understand students ‘ lives outside of school?VI. Rev ngs69 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 71. Beneficiary Perception Areas for Discussion (2) Report School Culture and Attitudes Students t St d t at MNTHS have more positive perceptions of th i school culture th d students at th t i l school, d h iti ti f their h l lt than do t d t t the typical h l describing it ibi as “fun,” “safe,” and “diverse.” MNTHS students agree more strongly than typical – and more strongly than ‘09-‘10 MNTHS students – that there is respect between adults and students and that their classmates care about succeeding academically. They also more strongly agree that they enjoy coming to school than is typical. When asked to indicate the most important thing that their school provides to help them do their best in class, students most frequently mention the positive culture at MNTHS. One student comments, “Having positive culture actually makes you want to come to school and try your best. It motivates you to go above and beyond without worrying about being made fun of. Everyone is always nice and cares about their work, and it ‘s great to be surrounded by people in an environment that you can trust and feel safe in.” While students agree more strongly than typical that discipline at MNTHS is fair, students continue mention “disrespectful” on view of Findin and Areas for Discussio students that have a “negative attitude, distracting other students from their work.” However, MNTHS students more strongly agree than students at the typical NewTech Network school that nearly all students and staff obey and enforce the rules, and that there is a process any student can use to raise concerns and help change the rules and policies at school. Additionally, perceptions of discipline differ by grade level at MNTHS. Compared to freshmen and juniors, sophomores and seniors less strongly agree that discipline at MNTHS is fair.  Given the overall positive culture that MNTHS fosters, how can the school address student concerns about selected students ‘ disruptive attitudes and behaviors to ensure consistency in student perceptions of discipline?VI. Rev ngs70 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 72. Beneficiary Perception Areas for Discussion (3) Report Preparation for the Future Compared t students at the typical school, MNTHS students b li C d to t d t t th t i l h l t d t believe th t th will h that they ill have more options after graduation b ti ft d ti because of what their school has done for them. A larger than typical proportion of MNTHS students expects to go to a 4-year college, and students also more strongly agree than typical that their school has helped them develop the skills and knowledge they will need for college, as well as understand the steps needed in order to apply to college. In the words of one student, “Being able to attend MNTHS is a huge privilege, and will without a doubt benefit me when it comes time to applying for colleges, studying in college, and help me with real world situations ” college situations. MNTHS students report a typical frequency of conversations with an adult at school about what to do after graduating and about what classes they need to graduate, although they report more frequently engaging in these conversations compared to MNTHS ‘09-‘10 students. In addition, students speak more frequently than is typical with adults outside of school about how they are doing in their classes and about ways to pay for college – both increases since MNTHS ‘09-‘10 results. on view of Findin and Areas for Discussio Seniors at MNTHS more frequently speak with adults at school about their future compared to students of other grade levels – a finding consistent with other schools that have participated in YouthTruth. However, seniors less strongly agree than other students at MNTHS that they will have increased options after graduation. One senior comments, “I will have more opinions of this school after I get into college and can accurately gauge how well this school prepared me for life after high school.” Another states that “any high school could have got me into the program I am in. 99.9 percent of the workforce went to regular school…. It is ignorant to think I will do better than all of them because of New Tech ” Tech.”  Are there ways in which teachers or other adults at MNTHS can more regularly communicate with students across all grade levels about their future goals? ngs  What might be driving seniors ‘ perceptions about their options after g g g p p p graduation?VI. Rev71 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 73. Beneficiary Perception Areas for Discussion (4) Report Rigor of Classes and Instruction MNTHS students rate the rigor of their classes and instruction higher than do students of the typical school. Specifically, t d t t th i f th i l d i t ti hi h th d t d t f th t i l h l S ifi ll MNTHS students more strongly agree that the work they do in class makes them think, that teachers understand the subjects they are teaching, and that teachers assign homework that helps students to better understand the subject than is typical. However, sophomores rate lower than other students regarding rigor of their classes and instruction, while freshmen and juniors rate higher overall. Students most frequently mention – and more frequently than typical – better course selection at MNTHS as a way in which the school could change to help students do their best in class. Students express wanting to have more elective options; One student says, “Having more options would probably help us to know what we like and don ‘t like to take in consideration when we decide what we want to do with our future,” and with more electives “I feel we would have even more fun at school because there would be more variety instead of every student basically taking the same classes.” on view of Findin and Areas for Discussio Although students spend at typical amount of time on homework outside of class, a larger than typical proportion of students requests more time to do work in school, such as having “a study hall so [students] could work on projects that…really need to get done.”  Are there ways in which MNTHS can address students ‘ requests for increased course selection, given the unique mission and learning focus of the school?  Given the rigor already broadly perceived by its students, can MNTHS institute additional time for students to complete their work?  How can MNTHS work to create more consistency in student perceptions of the school ‘s academic rigor?VI. Rev ngs72 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 74. Beneficiary Perception Contents Report I. Introduction 2 II. Executive Summary and Overall Items 7 III. Themes of Student Perceptions a) ) Relationships with Teachers p 12 b) School Culture and Attitudes 19 c) Future Goals and Aspirations 24 rces d) Life Outside of High School 35 raphics and School Resour e) Rigor of Classes and Instruction 40 IV. Assessment of School Support Services 57 V. V Summary of Qualitative Feedback 62 VI. Review of Findings and Areas for Discussion 67 VII. Student Demographics and School Resources 74VII. Student Demogr VIII. VIII Appendix 8673 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 75. Beneficiary Perception Student Demographics and School Resources Report  This section is intended to provide context to participating schools in interpreting their results. S h l participating i Y thT th h lt Schools ti i ti in YouthTruth have diffdifferent student populations and operate t t d t l ti d t under different structures and with particular educational approaches and resources – so, as with all of the information contained in this report, each school should interpret its results in light of its distinctive goals, philosophy, and objectives. Student Demographics rces  The following section highlights the demographic profile of students surveyed across raphics and School Resour participating schools. – The information in this section is based on self-reported data from students.VII. Student Demogr74 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 76. Beneficiary Perception Race of Respondents Report Race/Ethnicity of Survey Respondents Asian or Pacific 100% Islander Other American Indian/ Alaska Native Multi-racial 80% rces Caucasian/ ts White raphics and School Resour Perce of Respondent 60% African American/ ent Black 40% Hispanic/VII. Student Demogr 20% Latino 0% MNTHS ‘10-‘11 MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Average School Average NewTech School75 Note: This data was self-reported by students; 11 students selected Prefer not to say ‘ when asked this question. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 77. Beneficiary Perception Gender of Respondents Report Gender of Survey Respondents 100% Prefer not to say 80% Female rces ts raphics and School Resour Perce of Respondent 60% ent 40% MaleVII. Student Demogr 20% 0% MNTHS ‘10-‘11 MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Average School Average NewTech School76 Note: This data was self-reported by students. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 78. Beneficiary Perception Grade Level of Respondents Report Grade Level of Survey Respondents 100% 12th grade 80% rces 11th grade ts raphics and School Resour Perce of Respondent 60% ent 40% 10th gradeVII. Student Demogr 20% 9th grade 0% MNTHS ‘10-‘11 MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Average School Average NewTech School Note: This data was self-reported by students. Two MNTHS students did not identify as 9th, 10th, 11th, or77 12th graders. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 79. Beneficiary Perception Academic Grades of Respondents (1) Report Academic Grades of Survey Respondents 100% Don ‘t Know Mostly Ds and Below Mostly Cs and Ds 80% rces raphics and School Resour Mostly Bs and Cs Percent of Respondents 60% R 40%VII. Student Demogr 20% Mostly As and Bs 0% MNTHS ‘10-‘11 MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Average School Average NewTech School Note: This data was self-reported by students in response to the question, “What have most of your high school78 grades been?” CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 80. Beneficiary Perception Academic Grades of Respondents (2) Report Academic Grades of Survey Respondents 100% Don ‘t Know Mostly Ds and Below Mostly Cs and Ds 80% rces raphics and School Resour Percent of Respondents 60% Mostly Bs and Cs R 40%VII. Student Demogr 20% Mostly As and Bs 0% Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors Note: This data was self-reported by students in response to the question, “What have most of your high school79 grades been?” CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 81. Beneficiary Perception Types of Classes Taken by Respondents (1) Report Note: Scale ends at 80% 80% Types of Classes Taken by Survey Respondents MNTHS ‘10-‘11 64% MNTHS ‘09-‘10 Median School rces 60% Median NewTech 57% 56% 55% School raphics and School Resour Percent of Respondents 40% f 31% 29% 28% 26% 21%VII. Student Demogr 20% 17% 15% 10% 7% 7% 6% 6% 6% 5% 4% 2% 2% % 2% 2% 1% 0% General/Regular Honors/Courses ESL/ELL/Bilingual Career/Vocational Special education Don ‘t know for college credit (including AP/IB) Note: This data was self-reported by students; students were offered the above options and were asked to80 check all that apply. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 82. Beneficiary Perception Types of Classes Taken by Respondents (2) Report Note: Scale 80% ends at 80% Types of Classes Taken by Survey Respondents 66% 60% 59% rces 57% Freshmen 54% raphics and School Resour Sophomores 48% Juniors Seniors 43% 40% 23%VII. Student Demogr 20% 18% 16% 1% 1 10% 10% 9% 7% 5% 3% 2% 3% 2% 2% 1% 2% 1% 1% 0% General/Regular Honors/Courses for ESL/ELL/Bilingual Career/Vocational Special education Don ‘t know college credit (including AP/IB) Note: This data was self-reported by students; students were offered the above options and were asked to81 check all that apply. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 83. Beneficiary Perception School Resources Report School Resources  The school resources section provides additional context about how schools participating in YouthTruth differ operationally across key parameters. It contains charts based on data supplied by leadership at participating schools where possible. rces raphics and School ResourVII. Student Demogr82 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 84. Beneficiary Perception Student Populations Served Report Compared to the median school, MNTHS has a similar proportion of students who are eligible for FRPL, a larger proportion of students assigned to ELL classes, and a smaller proportion of students taking SPED classes. Student Populations Served 100% 80% rces raphics and School Resour 62% MNTHS ‘10-‘11 Percent of Respondents Median School 60% 58% Median NewTech School 49% 40%VII. Student Demogr 20% 9% 6% 7% 3% 2% 4% 0% FRPL1 ELL2 SPED3 Note: This data was provided by school leadership. 1: FRPL describes students who are eligible for free or reduced price lunch. 2: ELL refers to students who are assigned to English as a Second Language/ English Language Learner classes.83 3: SPED refers to students assigned to special education classes. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 85. Beneficiary Perception School Staffing Report The number of students per full-time teacher at MNTHS The number of students per counselor at MNTHS is: is:  Higher than the median school  LLower than the median school h h di h l  Higher than the median NewTech school  Lower than the median NewTech school Student to Teacher Ratio Student to Counselor Ratio 40 1000 Top of Top of range range 900 35 MNTHS Median 800 rces NewTech School 30 Range of R f raphics and School Resour NewTech 700 Number of Student Per Teacher mber of Students Per Counselor Schools 25 600 75th percentile ts 20 500 50th percentile (median) 400 15 75th percentile 25th percentile 300 Num 50th percentileVII. Student Demogr N 10 (median) 200 Bottom of 25th percentile 5 range 100 Bottom of 0 0 range Note: This data was provided by school leadership. The student to teacher ratio is based on the number of full-time-84 equivalent teachers and the student to counselor ratio is based on the number of counselors (guidance and/or college) at each school. CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 86. Beneficiary Perception Contents Report I. Introduction 2 II. Executive Summary and Overall Items 7 III. Themes of Student Perceptions a) ) Relationships with Teachers p 12 b) School Culture and Attitudes 19 c) Future Goals and Aspirations 24 d) Life Outside of High School 35 e) Rigor of Classes and Instruction 40 IV. Assessment of School Support Services 57 V. V Summary of Qualitative Feedback 62 VI. Review of Findings and Areas for Discussion 67 VII. Student Demographics and School Resources 74 VIII. VIII Appendix 86 ppendixVIII. Ap85 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 87. Beneficiary Perception Profiles of Participating Districts/Networks Report Number of Number of Date Most Recently District/Network Location Types of Schools Participating Participating Surveyed Schools Students Anonymous Charter Arizona Charter November 2010 14 4,103 School Network Anonymous Charter Michigan Charter November 2009 1 476 School Network ASPIRE Charter Schools California Charter November 2010 3 414 Atlanta Public Schools Georgia Traditional February 2010 10 3,578 College Success Washington Traditional November 2010 2 430 Foundation Denver Public Schools Colorado Charter, STEM February 2010 1 345 District of Columbia Washington, Traditional February 2009 1 891 Public Schools D.C. Maya Angelou Public Washington, Charter February 2009 y 1 94 Charter Schools D.C. DC Miami-Dade County Florida Traditional November 2010 13 19,715 Public Schools NewTech Network National Charter, STEM, redesign November 2010 18 4,135 North Carolina New STEM, early/middle North Carolina February 2010 39 5,715 5 715 Schools Project college, redesign Ohio STEM Learning Ohio STEM November 2010 5 1,335 ppendix Network Phoenix Union High Arizona Traditional, alternative November 2010 7 4,113 School DistrictVIII. Ap Seattle Public Schools Washington Traditional February 2009 1 587 Texas High School Texas STEM, redesign February 2010 3 656 Project86 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 88. Beneficiary Perception About the Center for Effective Philanthropy (CEP) Report Mission To provide data and create insight so philanthropic funders can better p g p p define, assess, and improve their effectiveness – and, as a result, their intended impact. Vision We seek a world in which pressing social needs are more effectively addressed. We believe improved performance of philanthropic funders can have a profoundly positive impact on nonprofit organizations and the people and communities they serve. Although our work is about measuring results, providing useful data, and improving performance, our ultimate goal is improving lives. We believe this can only be achieved through a powerful combination of dispassionate analysis ppendix and passionate commitment to creating a better society.VIII. Ap87 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011
  • 89. Beneficiary Perception Contact the Center for Effective Philanthropy Report  This report was produced for Manor New Technology High School in February 2011 by the Center for Effective Philanthropy. Please contact CEP with any questions about this report.  Contacts: - Valerie Threlfall, Director, YouthTruth 415-391-3070 x136 valeriet@effectivephilanthropy.org - Sindhu Knotz, Manager , g 415-391-3070 x129 sindhuk@effectivephilanthropy.org - Zach Kahn, Research Analyst ppendix 617-492-0800 x223VIII. Ap zachk@effectivephilanthropy.org zachk@effectivephilanthropy org88 CONFIDENTIAL  © The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Inc.  2/10/2011