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  • 1. PRESENT PERFECT TENSE
  • 2. There are basically three uses for the present perfect tense: -Experience -Change -Continuing Situation
  • 3. Present perfect tense for experience We often use the present perfect tense to talk about experience from the past. We are not interested in when you did something. We only want to know if you did it.
  • 4. Present perfect tense for change We also use the present perfect tense to talk about a change or new information.
  • 5. Present perfect tense for continuing situation We often use the present perfect tense to talk about a continuing situation. This is a state that started in the past and continues in the present (and will probably continue into the future). This is a state (not an action). We usually use for or since with this structure.
  • 6. Affirmative Subject + Have/Has + Past participle (V3) -He/She/It has drunk water. -I/You/We/They have played football.
  • 7. Negative Subject + Have/Has + not + Past Participle (V3) -I/You/We/They haven’t played football. -He/She/It hasn’t drunk water.
  • 8. Interrogative Have/Has + Subject + Past Participle (V3) -Has he/she/it eaten anything? -Have you/we/they seen the film?
  • 9. JUST/ALREADY/YET ‘Just’ is usually used only with the present perfect tense and it means ‘a short time ago’. It comes between the auxiliary verb (‘have’) and the past participle. -I have just seen Susan -Mike has just called. ‘Already’ is used to say that something has happened early or earlier than it might have happened. It usually comes in mid-position. -I’ve already spent my salary. -The train has already left. ‘Yet’ is used to talk about something which is expected to happen. It means ‘at any time up to now’. It comes at the end of the sentence. -Have you finished your homework yet? -I haven’t done my homework yet.
  • 10. SINCE/FOR We often use since and for when talking about time. Since + Point A point is a precise moment in time, for example: 9 o'clock, Monday, January. Since means "from a point in the past until now."
  • 11. For + Period A period is a duration of time, for example: 5 minutes, 2 weeks, 6 years. For means "from the beginning of the period until the end of the period."
  • 12. Been To/Gone To We use 'been' to mean that the person being talked about has visited the place, and come back. Notice the preposition 'to': -I have been to Paris (in my life, but now I'm in London, where I live). -She has been to school today (but now she's back at home).
  • 13. We use 'gone' to mean that the person is at the place now: -Where is John? He has gone to the bank. (He is at the bank now.) -Julie has gone to Mexico (She is in Mexico now.)
  • 14. Teacher: GİZEM CEYLAN