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NAA Conference Presentation
NAA Conference Presentation
NAA Conference Presentation
NAA Conference Presentation
NAA Conference Presentation
NAA Conference Presentation
NAA Conference Presentation
NAA Conference Presentation
NAA Conference Presentation
NAA Conference Presentation
NAA Conference Presentation
NAA Conference Presentation
NAA Conference Presentation
NAA Conference Presentation
NAA Conference Presentation
NAA Conference Presentation
NAA Conference Presentation
NAA Conference Presentation
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NAA Conference Presentation

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Resident\'s interest in installing rain gardens and rain barrels

Resident\'s interest in installing rain gardens and rain barrels

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  • The first column gives the results for the regression coefficients (corresponding to the parameter estimates on a log scale):
  • Transcript

    • 1. A NOVEL MOTIVATOR FOR ENGAGING PARK NEIGHBORS IN ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION PROJECTS
      Carin E. Vadala & Robert D. Bixler: Clemson University
      Terry L. Robison: Cleveland Metroparks
    • 2. Introduction
      Issues of flooding, erosion, pesticides washed into the river, invasive species and nuisance wildlife
      Residents whose property is either adjacent or near park boundaries can play a role in reducing these problems
      Residents can help slow storm water and reduce flooding and erosion by installing rain gardens and rain barrels on their property.
    • 3. Introduction
    • 4. Introduction
    • 5. Problem Statement
      Since altruistic environmental attitudes have fallen short as explanations for Environmentally Responsible Behaviors (ERB), self-interests will be used to further predict ERB. An understanding of stakeholder’s self-interests, intrinsic satisfaction and competence may help urban park reserves construct a situation where ERB becomes the most reasonable choice.
    • 6. First Generation ERB
      Self report (Cordano, Welcomer & Scherer, 2003; Dunlap, Van Liere, Mertig & Jones, 2000; Geller & Lasley, 1985; Noe & Snow, 1990)
      Moral norm activation of altruism (Guagano, Stern & Dietz, 1995; Schwartz, 1973)
      Attitudes, subjective norms and intentions to behave(Azjen, 1991)
      Self report and observation (Corral-Verdugo, 1997)
    • 7. Second Generation ERB
      Value-Belief-Norm, moving beyond measuring attitudes and behavioral intentions (Stern, Dietz, Kalof & Guagnano, 1995; Stern, Dietz, Abel, Guagnano & Kalof, 1999)
      Multiply determined motivations and different types of environmental outcomes (DeYoung, 2000; Stern & Dietz, 1994)
      Typology of four types of environmental behavior and four sets of causal variables (Stern, 2000)
    • 8. Behavior Typology
      Types of environmental behavior
      environmental activism, non-activist behaviors in a public sphere, private-sphere environmentalism, and other environmentally significant behaviors
      Four sets of causal variables
      attitudinal factors, contextual forces, personal capabilities, and habit or routine
      (Stern, 2000)
    • 9. Evaluating Behavior
      Outcome-based measures
      Response to incentives, coercion and reinforcement
      Context-based measures
      Behavior is result of context, setting or environmental motivation
      Useful for measuring whether ERB stems from intrinsic motivation and non-environmental motivations
      (De Young, 2000)
    • 10. Motivations
      ERB driven by self-interest, intrinsic satisfaction, frugality, direct participation, luxury and access to novel things, competence
      Avoidance of situations where people are not competent
      Knowing and doing are two different things (Corral-Verdugo, 1997)
      (De Young, 2000)
    • 11. Methods
      Two-phase design
      Focus group
      Survey methods
      750 Residents selected from seven urban park reserves in Northeastern Ohio, usable sample of 686
      Modified Dillman approach yielded a return of 364 surveys, response rate 53%
    • 12. Methods
      Created a variable to identify whether participants enjoyed working with their hands (alpha=.86)
      Two variables measured concern for issues in the urban park reserves
      Concern for pesticides and fertilizers, plants spreading (alpha=.89)
      Concern for frequent and excessive flooding (alpha=.88)
      Enjoyment of gardening (alpha=.78)
      Logistic regression
    • 13. Results
      Logistic Regression coefficient **p<.05, *p<.1 (odds ratio in parentheses)
    • 14. Hands-on personality
      Rain garden
      Low value: 21% more likely to install a rain garden
      Average value: 26% more likely to install a rain garden
      High value: 35% more likely to install a rain garden
      Rain barrel- not predictive
    • 15. Concern for pesticides
      Rain garden
      Least concerned: 19% probability to install a rain garden
      Average concern: 27% probability to install a rain garden
      Highly concerned: 38% probability to install a rain garden
      Rain barrel
      • Least concerned: 23% probability to install a rain barrel
      • 16. Average on concern: 31% probability to install a rain barrel
      • 17. Highly concerned: 39% probability to install a rain barrel
    • Gardening for recreation
      Rain garden
      Least prefer gardening: 15% probability to install a rain garden
      Average interest in gardening: 28% probability to install a rain garden
      High interest in gardening: 45% probability to install a rain garden
      Rain barrel
      Least prefer gardening: 18% probability to install a rain barrel
      Average interest in garden: 31% probability to install a rain barrel
      High interest in gardening: were 48% probability to install a rain barrel
    • 18. Summary of results
      Results strongly suggest that environmental concerns and enjoyment of the leisure activity gardening motivate an interest in installing rain barrels and rain gardens. (De Young, 2000; Stern & Dietz, 1994)
      De Young and Stern’s notion of multiply determined behaviors is supported by the lack of predictive power of flooding as an environmental concern and the self interest in gardening. (DeYoung, 2000; Stern, 2000)
    • 19. Implications
      Participation in (some) outdoor recreation positively associated with environmental concern, social worlds would overlap (Teisl & O’brien, 2003; Unruh, 1980; Choi, Loomis & Ditton, 1994)
      Foster leisure interests (IsoAhola, 1979; Tinsley & Tinsley, 1986)
      Practitioners should analyze desired ERB in terms of attitudes, knowledge, self interest behaviors and related constraints.

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