Portrait of an unknown gentleman
by Isaac Oliver, ca. 1595

The sonnet
The sonnet

1. Main characteristics
• A fourteen-line poem in iambic pentameter.
• A carefully patterned rhyme scheme.
• I...
The sonnet

2. Petrarchan sonnet
•

An octave rhyming ABBAABBA.

•

A sestet rhyming CDECDE or CDCDCD.

•

A turning point...
The sonnet

2. Petrarchan sonnet
The octave has the purpose to:

• introduce a problem (the poet describes his being struc...
The sonnet

2. Petrarchan sonnet
• The first quatrain introduces the problem.
• The second quatrain develops it.
The livel...
The sonnet

2. Petrarchan sonnet
• The beginning of the sestet is known as the volta, and it
introduces a pronounced chang...
The sonnet

3. Shakespearean sonnet
• Three quatrains rhyming ABABCDCDEFEF.
• A couplet rhyming EE.
• A turning point at t...
The sonnet

3. Shakespearean sonnet
• The first quatrain introduces an idea:
When my love swears that she is made of truth...
The sonnet

3. Shakespearean sonnet
• The third complicates it still further:
10

But wherefore says she not she is unjust...
The sonnet

4. Table of comparison
Petrarchan sonnet

Shakespearean sonnet

14 lines of iambic pentameter

14 lines of iam...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

3. the sonnet

905

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
905
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
42
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

3. the sonnet

  1. 1. Portrait of an unknown gentleman by Isaac Oliver, ca. 1595 The sonnet
  2. 2. The sonnet 1. Main characteristics • A fourteen-line poem in iambic pentameter. • A carefully patterned rhyme scheme. • Invented by the Italian Iacopo da Lentini in the first half of the 13th century. • Introduced into England by Sir Thomas Wyatt. • Two types of sonnet: Petrarchan and Shakespearean. Only Connect ... New Directions
  3. 3. The sonnet 2. Petrarchan sonnet • An octave rhyming ABBAABBA. • A sestet rhyming CDECDE or CDCDCD. • A turning point at the end of the 8th line. • The 9th line is sometimes introduced by words like: and, if, so, but, yet. Only Connect ... New Directions
  4. 4. The sonnet 2. Petrarchan sonnet The octave has the purpose to: • introduce a problem (the poet describes his being struck with the sight of his woman) • express a desire • reflect on reality • present a situation that causes doubt or conflict in the poet Only Connect ... New Directions
  5. 5. The sonnet 2. Petrarchan sonnet • The first quatrain introduces the problem. • The second quatrain develops it. The lively sparks that issue from those eyes, Against the which there vaileth no defence, Have pierced my heart, and done it none offence, With quaking pleasure more than once or twice. 5 Was never man could any thing devise, Sunbeams to turn with so great vehemence To daze man's sight, as by their bright presence Dazed am I; much like unto the guise Only Connect ... New Directions
  6. 6. The sonnet 2. Petrarchan sonnet • The beginning of the sestet is known as the volta, and it introduces a pronounced change in tone in the sonnet. • The sestet’s purpose is to make a comment on the problem or to apply a solution to it. 10 1 2 Of one stricken with dint of lightning, Blind with the stroke, and cying (1) here and there: So call I for help, I not (2) when nor where, The pain of my fall patiently bearing: For straight after the blaze, as is no wonder, Of deadly noise hear I the fearful thunder. (Sir Thomas Wyatt) Or, erring. i.e. know not. Only Connect ... New Directions
  7. 7. The sonnet 3. Shakespearean sonnet • Three quatrains rhyming ABABCDCDEFEF. • A couplet rhyming EE. • A turning point at the end of the 8th line. • The 9th line is sometimes introduced by words like: and, if, so, but, yet, nor. Only Connect ... New Directions
  8. 8. The sonnet 3. Shakespearean sonnet • The first quatrain introduces an idea: When my love swears that she is made of truth I do believe her, though I know she lies, That she might think me some untutor'd youth, Unlearned in the world's false subtleties. • The second quatrain complicates it: 5 Thus vainly thinking that she thinks me young, Although she knows my days are past the best, Simply I credit her false speaking tongue: On both sides thus is simple truth suppress'd. Only Connect ... New Directions
  9. 9. The sonnet 3. Shakespearean sonnet • The third complicates it still further: 10 But wherefore says she not she is unjust? And wherefore say not I that I am old? O, love's best habit is in seeming trust, And age in love loves not to have years told: • The final epigrammatic couplet resolves the whole thing: Therefore I lie with her and she with me, And in our faults by lies we flatter'd be. (W. Shakespeare, Sonnet 138) Only Connect ... New Directions
  10. 10. The sonnet 4. Table of comparison Petrarchan sonnet Shakespearean sonnet 14 lines of iambic pentameter 14 lines of iambic pentameter Division into 2 sections: the octave presents a problem or situation the sestet solves or clarifies the situation Division into 4 sections: 3 quatrains present a problem or situation a couplet solves or summarizes the problem. Rhyme scheme: ABABABAB or ABBAABBA for the octave CDECDE or CDCDEE for the sestet Rhyme scheme: ABAB Quatrain I CDCD Quatrain II EFEF Quatrain III GG Couplet Only Connect ... New Directions
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×