26. wuthering heights

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26. wuthering heights

  1. 1. Wuthering HeightsEmily BrontëTop Withens, possible inspiration for the Earnshaw family house.
  2. 2. Emily Brontë 1. Key events Part One: First generation • The foundling Heathcliff is brought to Wuthering Heights by Mr Earnshaw. • Oppression and exploitation of Heathcliff by Hindley, Mr Earnshaw’s son. • Cathy Earnshaw and Heathcliff become twin souls. The bill for the 1992 film version Only Connect ... New Directions
  3. 3. Emily Brontë 1. Key events Part One: First generation • Cathy Earnshaw’s transformation from ‘savage’ to ‘proper lady’ during her stay at Thrushcross Grange. • Cathy’s betrayal of her ‘soul mate’ Heathcliff. • Heathcliff’s departure (splitting of the oak). • Cathy’s marriage to Edgar Linton. The bill for the 1992 film version Only Connect ... New Directions
  4. 4. Emily Brontë 1. Key events Part One: First generation • Heathcliff’s return as a ‘gentleman’ intent on revenge. • Cathy’s attempts to have both Heathcliff and Edgar. • Cathy’s derangement and illness. Top Withens Only Connect ... New Directions
  5. 5. Emily Brontë 1. Key events Part One: First generation • Birth of Cathy II, Catherine’s and Edgar’s daughter. • Cathy’s death and Heathcliff’s despair. Top Withens Only Connect ... New Directions
  6. 6. Emily Brontë 1. Key events Part Two: Second generation • Heathcliff’s revenge: property, gained by marriage to Isabella Linton and expropriation. • Degradation of Hareton, Heathcliff’s and Isabella’s son. • Heathcliff loses interest in revenge. Near Top Withens Only Connect ... New Directions
  7. 7. Emily Brontë 1. Key events Part Two: Second generation • Heathcliff and Cathy together in death. • Marriage of Cathy II and Hareton: property restored to rightful owner. Near Top Withens Only Connect ... New Directions
  8. 8. Emily Brontë 2. Narrative structure Non-linear narrative structure Use of flashback Beginning in medias res Binary structure Elicits curiosity in the Invites reader comparison between the two stories Brontë Parsonage in Haworth, where the Implies an active reader Brontë family lived Only Connect ... New Directions
  9. 9. Emily Brontë 3. Narrative point of view • Two frame narrators: Lockwood (as external narrator) and Nelly Dean (as internal narrator). • Chinese box structure: stories within stories. • Two interpreters; two auditors (reader and Lockwood closely identified). Lockwood’s dream in an etching by Rosalind Whitman Only Connect ... New Directions
  10. 10. Emily Brontë 3. Narrative point of view Nelly Dean’s perspective • Conventional  based on morality, religion and superstition. • She thinks Cathy is “wayward”, “ill-tempered”. “I vexed her frequently by trying to bring down her arrogance” (Part I, Ch. VIII). “She was too much fond of Heathcliff” (Part I Ch. V). Only Connect ... New Directions
  11. 11. Emily Brontë 3. Narrative point of view Lockwood’s perspective • The voice of conventional society. • An unreliable narrator because he does not know all the details of the story. Only Connect ... New Directions
  12. 12. Emily Brontë 3. Narrative point of view Implications of the multiple narrators • Strangeness and ‘otherness’ preserved. • Multiple interpretations: no single ‘truth’. • Unique Interpretation becomes impossible  modern aspect of the novel. Only Connect ... New Directions
  13. 13. Emily Brontë 4. Main characters Catherine • Wayward, difficult, rebellious, spirited & ‘unfeminine’. “her spirits were always at high water-mark, her Charlotte Riley as Catherine and Tom Hardy as tongue always going... A wild, wick slip she was Heathcliff in Coky Giedroyc’s 2009 film version but she had the bonniest eye, and sweetest smile and lightest foot in the parish” (Part I, Ch. V) “heaven did not seem to be my home” (Part I, Ch. IX) Only Connect ... New Directions
  14. 14. Emily Brontë 4. Main characters Heathcliff • Persistent ambiguity: man or beast? • Unknown origins, absence of social connection. • Absence of emotion, “insensible”. Timothy Dalton in Robert Fuest’s 1970 film version Only Connect ... New Directions
  15. 15. Emily Brontë 4. Main characters Heathcliff • Deteriorates into brute state. • Violent and extreme language. • A Byronic hero. Timothy Dalton in Robert Fuest’s 1970 film version Only Connect ... New Directions
  16. 16. Emily Brontë 4. Main characters Heathcliff / Catherine relationship • Vindictive, violent and possessive “They may bury me twelve feet deep and throw the church down over me; but I won’t rest till you are with me… I never will!” (Part I, Ch. XII) • Merged identities “If all else perished and he remained, I should still continue to be; and, if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the Universe would turn to a mighty stranger….Nelly, I am Heathcliff!” (Part I, Ch. IX) Only Connect ... New Directions
  17. 17. Emily Brontë 4. Main characters Heathcliff / Catherine relationship • Vitality, authenticity, freedom. • Rejection of class values. • Heathcliff and Cathy symbolise the instinctual, unconscious forces. • Contrasted with ‘civilised’ characters: Robert Brook, Heathcliff and Cathy, from the novel Wuthering Heights, 20th century, Private Edgar, Lockwood, Nelly Dean. Collection. Only Connect ... New Directions
  18. 18. Emily Brontë 5. The Moors as symbol The Moors represent the Romantic rejection of Attempt to escape society and the desire to transcend its rules English Moors English Moors Only Connect ... New Directions
  19. 19. Emily Brontë 5. The Moors as symbol Cathy reconciles self & class Escape is society through her marriage impossible to Edgar and her relationship with Heathcliff English Moors English Moors Only Connect ... New Directions
  20. 20. Emily Brontë 6. Gothic elements • Heathcliff as a Gothic villain in his inhuman treatment of his wife and his son. • The sinister atmosphere of Wuthering Heights surrounded by the wilderness. • Catherine’s ghost. Only Connect ... New Directions
  21. 21. Emily Brontë 6. Gothic elements • The dreams and superstitions often mentioned. These are not used to frighten the reader, but to convey the struggle between the two opposed principles of love and hate, of order and chaos. Only Connect ... New Directions
  22. 22. Emily Brontë 7. Opposite principles Wuthering Heights Thrushcross Grange • The home of the Earnshaws. • The home of the Lintons. • Severe, gloomy, brutal in aspect • Reflects a Victorian conception and atmosphere. of life. • Symbolises stability, kindness • Firmly rooted in local tradition and and respectability. custom. • The background for the life of primitive passion led by its owner. principle of storm and energy principle of calm Only Connect ... New Directions

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