Samuel Taylor ColeridgePeter Vandyke, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, 1795. London,National Portrait Gallery.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge      1. Life  •    Born in Devonshire in 1772.  •    Studied at Christ’s Hospital School       in ...
Samuel Taylor Coleridge      1. Life  •   After the disillusionment with the      French Revolution, he planned a      uto...
Samuel Taylor Coleridge   2. Main works                                                     1798  The Rime of the Ancient...
Samuel Taylor Coleridge   3. Coleridge and Wordsworth     Wordsworth’s poetry    • Content  Things from      ordinary lif...
Samuel Taylor Coleridge   3. Coleridge and Wordsworth     Wordsworth’s poetry    • Style  The language of      common men...
Samuel Taylor Coleridge   3. Coleridge and Wordsworth     Coleridge’s poetry    • Content  Supernatural      characters. ...
Samuel Taylor Coleridge   3. Coleridge and Wordsworth     Coleridge’s poetry    • Style  Archaic language rich      in so...
Samuel Taylor Coleridge   4. Coleridge’s imagination                                                                      ...
Samuel Taylor Coleridge   5. Coleridge’s nature               Nature                              Unlike Wordsworth, it is...
Samuel Taylor Coleridge   6. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner    The story of a mariner who    commits an act against natur...
Samuel Taylor Coleridge   6. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner    The story of a mariner who    commits an act against natur...
Samuel Taylor Coleridge   6. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner    The characters    •The mariner  He is unnaturally old,   ...
Samuel Taylor Coleridge   7. The atmosphere and the characters   •   Death  Embodied in a hulking form       on the ghost...
Samuel Taylor Coleridge   8. The Rime and medieval ballads                          The Rime                              ...
Samuel Taylor Coleridge   9. The Rime: interpretations   This poem has been interpreted in different   ways:   1.Descripti...
Samuel Taylor Coleridge   9. The Rime: interpretations   This poem has been interpreted in different   ways:   4.The poeti...
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  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • 23. coleridge

    1. 1. Samuel Taylor ColeridgePeter Vandyke, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, 1795. London,National Portrait Gallery.
    2. 2. Samuel Taylor Coleridge 1. Life • Born in Devonshire in 1772. • Studied at Christ’s Hospital School in London, and then in Cambridge, but never graduated. • Influenced by French revolutionary ideals. Christ’s Hospital School Only Connect ... New Directions
    3. 3. Samuel Taylor Coleridge 1. Life • After the disillusionment with the French Revolution, he planned a utopian commune-like society, Pantisocracy, in Pennsylvania. This project came to an end. • Fruitful artistic collaboration with the poet and friend William Wordsworth in the 1797-1799 period. Christ’s Hospital School • Died in 1834. Only Connect ... New Directions
    4. 4. Samuel Taylor Coleridge 2. Main works 1798  The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, the first poem of the collection Lyrical Ballads. 1816  Christabel, an unfinished narrative poem. 1816  the dreamlike poem Kubla Khan, composed under the influence of opium. 1817  Biographia Literaria, a classic text of literary criticism and autobiography. Hand-written page from Kubla Khan Only Connect ... New Directions
    5. 5. Samuel Taylor Coleridge 3. Coleridge and Wordsworth Wordsworth’s poetry • Content  Things from ordinary life. • Aim  To give these ordinary things the charm of novelty. William Shuter, Portrait of Wordsworth, 1798 Only Connect ... New Directions
    6. 6. Samuel Taylor Coleridge 3. Coleridge and Wordsworth Wordsworth’s poetry • Style  The language of common men purified by the poet. • Main interest  Relationship between man and nature; imagination as a means of knowledge. William Shuter, Portrait of Wordsworth, 1798 Only Connect ... New Directions
    7. 7. Samuel Taylor Coleridge 3. Coleridge and Wordsworth Coleridge’s poetry • Content  Supernatural characters. • Aim  To give them a semblance of truth. Washington Allston, Portrait of Coleridge, 1814 Only Connect ... New Directions
    8. 8. Samuel Taylor Coleridge 3. Coleridge and Wordsworth Coleridge’s poetry • Style  Archaic language rich in sound devices. • Main interest  The creative power of imagination. Washington Allston, Portrait of Coleridge, 1814 Only Connect ... New Directions
    9. 9. Samuel Taylor Coleridge 4. Coleridge’s imagination •Creative, original, used Imagination Primary unconsciously •Human individual power to Secondary produce images •The power to give chaos a certain order Fancy Poetic faculty, which not only A kind of logical faculty: the gives shape and order to a given mechanical ability the poet has to use world, but builds new worlds. devices, like metaphors, alliterations in poetry in order to blend various «ingredients» into beautiful images Only Connect ... New Directions
    10. 10. Samuel Taylor Coleridge 5. Coleridge’s nature Nature Unlike Wordsworth, it is not a moral guide or a source of consolation. It represents the awareness of the presence of the ideal in the real. Not identified with the divine. Coleridge saw it in a sort of neo- The material world is nothing but Platonic interpretation, as the reflection the projection of the real world of of the perfect world of “ideas”. “ideas” on the flux of time. Only Connect ... New Directions
    11. 11. Samuel Taylor Coleridge 6. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner The story of a mariner who commits an act against nature by killing an albatross. • At the beginning of the poem the mariner stops a wedding guest: he “cannot choose but hear” a sad, mysterious story about the burden of the mariner’s guilt. Gustave Doré, The killing of the Albatross, 1877 Only Connect ... New Directions
    12. 12. Samuel Taylor Coleridge 6. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner The story of a mariner who commits an act against nature by killing an albatross. •The mariner expiates his sin by travelling around and telling the people he meets his story  to teach them love and respect to nature’s creatures. Gustave Doré, The killing of the Albatross, 1877 Only Connect ... New Directions
    13. 13. Samuel Taylor Coleridge 6. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner The characters •The mariner  He is unnaturally old, with skinny hands and “glittering eyes”. •Sailors  Ill-fated members of the ship carrying the mariner. •Wedding Guest  One of three people on their way to a wedding reception. After the Ancient Mariner’s story, he becomes both “sadder and... wiser”. Gustave Doré, The mariner is left alone on the ship Only Connect ... New Directions
    14. 14. Samuel Taylor Coleridge 7. The atmosphere and the characters • Death  Embodied in a hulking form on the ghost ship. He plays dice with Life-in-Death and wins the lives of the sailors. • Life-in-Death: Embodied in a beautiful, ghostly woman. She wins the Ancient Mariners soul playing dice and condemns him to a limbo- like living death. The atmosphere is mysterious and dream-like. Gustave Doré, Life-in-Death Only Connect ... New Directions
    15. 15. Samuel Taylor Coleridge 8. The Rime and medieval ballads The Rime Medieval ballads Structure Mostly written in four-line stanzas; Written in four-line stanzas; a mixture of dialogue and narration a mixture of dialogue and narration Content A dramatic story in verse A dramatic story in verse Language Archaic; realistic in details and imagery Archaic Style Frequent repetitions, refrain; alliteration Repetitions, refrain, alliteration and internal rhyme Theme Travel and wandering; the supernatural Magic, love, domestic tragedies Aim Didactic No aim Only Connect ... New Directions
    16. 16. Samuel Taylor Coleridge 9. The Rime: interpretations This poem has been interpreted in different ways: 1.Description of a dream. 2.An allegory of the life of the soul: from crime, through punishment , to redemption. 3.Metaphor of man’s original sin in Eden. Gustave Doré, The Mariner is gone Only Connect ... New Directions
    17. 17. Samuel Taylor Coleridge 9. The Rime: interpretations This poem has been interpreted in different ways: 4.The poetic journey of Romanticism: The mariner = poet His guilt = the origin of poetry Regret for a state of lost innocence caused by the Industrial Revolution Gustave Doré, The Mariner is gone Only Connect ... New Directions
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