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Haverkampf pe 3-2011
 

Haverkampf pe 3-2011

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    Haverkampf pe 3-2011 Haverkampf pe 3-2011 Presentation Transcript

    • Building Political EffectivenessAcross Cooperative Extension
      County Leadership Conference
      March 10, 2011
    • Today’s Goals
      Super Session
      Part 1: Learning about and using the PE Assessment Tool and its 4 Principles
      Part 2: Learning from your peers through a Challenge Roundtable
      Safe environment – what is said here stays here
      Have fun!
    • Welcome!Overview of Cooperative Extension’s political effectiveness effort
      Eloisa Gómez and Kristine ZaballosPolitical Effectiveness Working Group Co-Chairs
    • Political effectiveness is…
      Responsive educational programs
      Strong relationships with key decision makers
      Effective communications
      Fiscal awareness and political sensitivity
    • PRINCIPLE #1:Responsive Educational Programs
      Eloisa Gómez
      Director, Milwaukee County Cooperative Extension Office
      Karen Nelson
      Department Head and 4-H Youth Development Educator
      Columbia County Cooperative Extension Office
    • Responsive educational programs:Have you done any of the following?
      Involved elected officials, partners, clients and friends in program planning?
      Incorporated UW system resources into program planning?
      Considered potential political impacts when planning programs?
      Other?
    • PRINCIPLE #2STRONG Relationships with Key Decision-Makers
      Kelly Haverkampf
      Community Development Educator, Vilas County Cooperative Extension Office
    • Strong relationships with key decision makers:Have you done any of the following?
      Developed a database of influential decision-makers and key supporters?
      Developed and maintain professional networks?
      Worked to establish relationships with elected officials beyond the County Extension Committee?
      Worked with other county, state and federal agencies to establish collaborative relationships?
      Other?
    • Mapping your Circle of Influence
      List your regular contacts in your job or position
      Are they decision makers or influencers?
      What are your communication points with the influencers?
      What are their communication points with the decision makers?
      How consistent are the messages along each communication line?
    • County Board
      State Legislators
      County Extension Committee
      UWEX Administration
      Program Participants and Volunteers
      County-based Community Development Educator
      UWEX Program Leader
      County Department Head
      UWEX District Director
    • 3 Levels of Communication to Build Strong Relationships
    • PRINCIPLE #3effective communications
      Pamela Seelman
      Communications Program Manager, Dean’s Office
    • Effective communications
      Developed a strategic marketing or promotions plan?
      Invited key decision makers to participate in Cooperative Extension events?
      Used traditional and social media outlets to communicate the value of your programming?
      Know how to explain the work of your colleagues as well as your own?
      Other?
    • Communications matter!
      Engage in open and ongoing dialog
      Communicate with multiple audiences
      Explain the value, breadth of our programs
      Share success stories, impacts and outcomes
      Use evaluation tools and reports to demonstrate accountability, program impacts
      Develop an elevator speech
    • An elevator speech is…
      A summary that describes our work and our services
      An overview
      Who we are
      What we do
    • Name derived from
      Notion that it is delivered in a short period of time
      For example, the time it takes to travel in a typical elevator
    • Easy part
      You know what you do at work
    • Not so easy part
      Needs to be…
      Short
      Simple
      Effective
    • Not so easy part
      Elevator speeches need to be tailored for the specific audience
    • General Audience Example…
      We educate people where they live and work, connecting them to the University of Wisconsin to help grow people, jobs and communities.
    • Viral example:
      Lawless:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9sBaDXnWDwY
       
       
    • Elevator Branding World Cup Personal Example and competition winner…
      “I am a state extension specialist. I work in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at University of Wisconsin Cooperative Extension; where life long learning helps the people of Wisconsin, the US, and the world make life changing decisions a reality.”
      Branding World Cup winner David Kammel
    • Branding World Cup lessons learned:
      1) There's no one single way to do this kind of thing well.
      2) Stories sell -- they do not have to be fancy.
      3) Sincerity sells.
    • Crave Bros. elevator speech
      “We take milk from cows and make cheese.”
    • What is your elevator speech?
    • Principle #4: Fiscal awareness & political sensitivity
      Rosemary Potter
      Director of Government RelationsUW Colleges and UW-Extension
      432 N. Lake Street
      608 263-7678
      rosemary.potter@uwex.uwc.edu
      www.uwex.uwc.edu/government/
    • Fiscal awareness and political sensitivity
      Maintain communications with people who are influential in budget development and adoption?
      Share impacts, outcomes, successes and financial benefits of your work with key decision makers?
      Seek to understand the structure and nuance of the budgeting process?
      Know who’s influential to the budget process and know what their interests are?
      Other?
    • Changing our Blueprint
    • These are Critical Times
      Proposed cut to Smith-Lever Funds – 5%
      Proposed cut to County Funds in 2011-2013 state budget – shared revenue, aid to local governments, community aids etc.
      The cut in these funds will differ by county
      Proposed State funds to UWEX/UWC  - 11%
    • Changing our Blueprint
      We are Resourceful
      Keep an Open Perspective
      Continue the Conversation
    • Changing our Blueprint
      Make Requests
      All Perspectives Are Legitimate
      Don’t Take Things Personally
    • Changing our Blueprint
      Developing Structures in Place to:
      • Value the building of the relationship with decision makers
      • Continue the conversation
      • Listen/contribute to the conversation in other venues
      • Communicate often
      • Do not worry about becoming a pest
    • Thank You! Questions?
      Brought to you by the Political Effectiveness Working Group
      University of Wisconsin, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Wisconsin counties cooperating. UW-Extension provides equal opportunities in employment and programming including Title IX and ADA.