Public art

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Public art

  1. 1. Public art art presented in a public space
  2. 2. Public Art What is public art? Why make public art? Who pays for public art? Why is it controversial?
  3. 3. What is public art? Public art is art created with the intention that it will be viewed by the general public, in the public place. For example: Art created for municipal buildings or city parks. Public art is generally created with the idea of Site Specificity or, created specifically for the location it is installed, the artist does not intend for it to go any other place. These artworks could be created as permanent works of art or as temporary works. Works which are meant to last only a certain period of time.
  4. 4. Why do artists make public art? To make money or for profit To expose their art to a wider population of people or for exposure To educate the public Could be about art in general, or even a specific cause For functionality, the artwork serves a utilitarian purpose. As part of the new deal in the 1930’s the Public Works of Art Project was created. “emphasized the “American scene” as subject matter—initiating about 700 mural projects and creating nearly 7,000 easel paintings and watercolours, about 750 sculptures, more than 2,500 works of graphic art, and numerous other works designated to embellish nonfederal public buildings and parks.” "Public Works of Art Project." Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2012. Web. 8 Feb. 2012.<http://www.school.eb.com/eb/article-9001168>.
  5. 5. Who pays for public art? The government. The artist. A private funder.
  6. 6. Why is it controversial? It is sometimes funded with tax payer money It is sometimes illegal People may not all understand it Not everyone will like the art It takes up space
  7. 7. Public Sculptures a look at sculptures in the public space
  8. 8. Richard Serra, Tilted Arc, Almost as soon as it was built controversy lined this 1981 wall. This sculpture stood for only a short period of time before it was required to be taken down. Artist was offered the choice to move the sculpture, but said it was site specific “accuse it of attracting graffiti, rats, and terrorists who might use it as a
  9. 9. Located in Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois Cloud Gate, 2004- Anish Kapoor, 2006 Sculpture reflects a distorted image of the skyline as well as the millions of people who view it every year The stainless steel sculpture was originally envisioned as the centerpiece of the Lurie Garden at the southeast corner of the park. However, Park officials believed the piece was too large for
  10. 10. Robert Winkler, Over and Up, 2010 Temporarily on display at Western Carolina University Not sit specific All three dimensions LxWxH all 7.9 feet http://www.wcu.edu/museum/132.htm What does weather do to a material like wood?
  11. 11. Murals commissioned paintings on walls
  12. 12. Raphael, School of Athens, 1510Murals can be 1512 collaborative or created by one artist. Murals are typically large. Painting created for the vatican. This painting is a frescoe, or a painting embedded in plaster. Features figures such as: Plato, Aristotle,
  13. 13. Diego Rivera, Mural In National Palace Like many murals the murals of artist Diego Rivera tend to tell a story This mural tells the story of Mexico’s history Using the people as a reference you can tell the immense size of this painting
  14. 14. Murals in Murals often depict the the area area which they are painted. They also typically depict the lives of people or things happening in those areas. Forest City Mural created in 2000 Mural of life in Cleveland County 2005 American Legion Mural 2008 Rutherford Hospital Mural 2005
  15. 15. Street Art a look at graffiti and a new culture of urban artists
  16. 16. Ancient graffiti would have represented political figures Ancient Graffiti Would have been created in city centers or forums This particular early graffiti is thought to be the first representation of Jesus. Ancient graffiti would also have
  17. 17. Traditional Graffiti Traditional graffiti artists are anonymous to the general public Often includes tags, or quick territorial markings of artists or even gangs Sometimes is gang related Artists create different fonts for spray painting or writing messages or symbols Messages are sometimes poetic or satirical Graffiti by SAMO aka Jean Michel Basquiat. Photographed by Henry Flynt Artworks are considered temporary often being replaced by the artwork of other artists or painted over by authorities. Non Commissioned works of graffiti are illegal and considered vandalism.
  18. 18. Artist uses images which are rendered in the style of computer Icons. Pixel Phil Phil’s images clash with the environment due to their virtual style and the placement of those in a nonvirtual environment. In this image look at the relationship between the subject of the artwork and
  19. 19. Created for the Obama 2008 campaign. Shepherd Fairey, Obama, Changed to the HOPE 2007 seen from image Obama’s Campaign. Artist sued by Associated Press for use of their photograph Shepherd Fairey part of a slew of street artists making the jump from urban art to fine art. What’s the difference in this type of printed

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