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LAP - Rajkot Case Study

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Workshop Organized by CUE, CEPT University …

Workshop Organized by CUE, CEPT University
30th June 2014

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  • 1. Centre for Urban Equity, CEPT University, Ahmedabad, and Shakti Foundation, Delhi welcome you to NATIONAL WORKSHOP ON LOCAL ACCESSIBILITY PLANNING IN INDIAN CITIES Regenta Ahmedabad 15, Ashram Road, Ahmedabad-380013 30th June 2014
  • 2. 1 F I E L D W O R K 2 PROPOSED METHODOLOGY Source: (CUE-CEPT, 2014) Using technical and participatory methods, identify ISSUES AND POTENTIALS. Break down OBJECTIVES into sub objectives. Device strategies to achieve SUB-OBJECTIVES. Using participatory techniques, help the community evolve a VISION. Also set OBJECTIVES to help evaluate the progress of the plan. Engage consultants/contractors to IMPLEMENT projects monitored by ward sabha. Use planning consultants to devise PROJECTS in order to achieve sub- objectives. Allow community to PRIORITIZE.
  • 3. 1 F I E L D W O R K 2 PROPOSED METHODOLOGY Source: (CUE-CEPT, 2014) Using technical and participatory methods, identify ISSUES AND POTENTIALS. Break down OBJECTIVES into sub objectives. Device strategies to achieve SUB-OBJECTIVES. Using participatory techniques, help the community evolve a VISION. Also set OBJECTIVES to help evaluate the progress of the plan. Engage consultants/contractors to IMPLEMENT projects monitored by ward sabha. Use planning consultants to devise PROJECTS in order to achieve sub- objectives. Allow community to PRIORITIZE.
  • 4. • Location & Demography • Socio-Economic Characteristics • Land Use • Transport • Social Amenities City: Rajkot • Land Use • Transport • Basic Services • Social Amenities Measured Accessibility • Land Use • Transport • Basic Services • Social Amenities Perceived Accessibility SNAPSHOT
  • 5. RAJKOT CITY: LOCATION Rajkot Vadodara Ahmedabad Bhavnagar Surat Jamnagar 2.5% 4.7% 2.1% 1.1% 1.3% - 0.5% In terms of Growth Rate, 22nd in the world, 06th in the country, and 02ndin the state. Rajkot Population: 1,288,599 persons Area: 104.8 square kilometres Density: 127 ppHa
  • 6. CITY: DEMOGRAPHY 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 0-4 10-14 20-24 30-34 40-44 50-54 60-64 70-74 > 80 -700 -600 -500 -400 -300 -200 -100 0 Age Groups MaleFemale Almost 50% With a major chunk of the population in the productive 20-45 age bracket, Rajkot has the chance to grow even faster. Source: (RMC, 2009)
  • 7. CITY: WARD MAP Source: (RMC, 2011)
  • 8. Variables Rajkot City Ward 9 Ward 17 Ward 20 Population (2011) 1,288,599 44,200 61,000 46,600 Area (sqkms) 104.8 27.8 56.6 20.5 Density (ppHa) 127 159 108 228 Households 306,809 10,650 13,525 10,964 HH Size 4.20 4.15 4.51 4.25 SC/ST/General (in%) 6.5/0.7/92.7 1.3/0.7/97.9 12.1/0.07/87.8 28.3/0.9/70.7 SEG1 (in%) 26.73 39.26 61.66 18.14 SEG2 (in%) 66.71 49.20 37.06 67.86 SEG3 (in%) 6.65 11.53 1.26 14.00 18% 68% 14% S l u m s + S E W S L I G + M I G H I G SOCIO-ECONOMIC COMPOSITION OF THE CITY CITY AND WARDS: DEMOGRAPHY Source: (RMC, 2011)
  • 9. High Income Group Middle Income Group Low Income Group SEWS Housing WARD 20: CHARACTERISTICS Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT)
  • 10. 42% 44% 12% H I G M I G L I G S E W S SOCIO-ECONOMIC COMPOSITION OF THE WARD WARD 20: Socio-Economic Groups GondalRoad DhebarRoad Khodiyarnagar Road
  • 11. CITY: LAND USE Source: (RMC, 2009)
  • 12. CITY: LAND USE 2009 53% 16%7% 8% agriculture residential commercial industrial publicsemi-public recreational transportation waterbodies others 5%5% Source: CEPT University. 2013. “Low Carbon Comprehensive Mobility Plan Rajkot 2011-31 (Draft)”. Ahmedabad. Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT)
  • 13. 59% 31% 5% Residential Commercial recreational Industrial public semi-public 3% Ward 20 Ward 20: Land Use GondalRoad DhebarRoad Khodiyarnagar Road (Source: Rajkot Municipal Corporation)
  • 14. CITY: ROAD NETWORK Towards Gondal Towards Ahmedabad Towards Jamnagar With increasing vehicles in the city and narrow roads, more pressure on transport infrastructure Source: (RMC, 2009)
  • 15. 84% highways arterials localand collectorroads 11% sub-arterials 2011 Speeds 18 kmph Speeds 40 kmph 22.0m 18.0 m Speeds 10 kmph 7.5m Speeds 14 kmph 12.5 m ROW 3% Outerroads Speeds 16 kmph 10.0m CITY: NETWORK CHARACTERISTICS Source: (RMC, 2009)
  • 16. 3% 65% 32% A r t e r i a l S u b - A r t e r i a l C o l l e c t o r & L o c a l Ward 20: Road Network GondalRoad DhebarRoad Khodiyarnagar Road
  • 17. CITY: FOOTPATHS Arterials & Sub-Arterials have Footpaths but they are discontinuous and of width less than 2m, not comfortable for walking Source: (RMC, 2009)
  • 18. 1 2 3 1 Parking on Footpath 2 Broken Footpath 3 Obstructed Footpath Ward 20: Footpaths GondalRoad DhebarRoad Khodiyarnagar Road
  • 19. CITY: IPT STOPS Shuttle Autos run on all the arterials of the city, acting as a Public Transport System in absence of buses Source: (RMC, 2009)
  • 20. 1 3 2 1 2 3 Ward 20: IPT GondalRoad DhebarRoad Khodiyarnagar Road
  • 21. CITY: PUBLIC TRANSPORT Source: (RMC, 2009)
  • 22. 1 2 3 1 2 3 Ward 20: PT STOPS GondalRoad DhebarRoad Khodiyarnagar Road
  • 23. CITY: EDUCATIONAL AMENITIES Source: (RMC, 2009)
  • 24. CITY: HEALTH AMENITIES Source: (RMC, 2009)
  • 25. CITY: OTHER AMENITIES Source: (RMC, 2009)
  • 26. 1 2 3 1 2 3 WARD 20: SOCIAL AMENITIES Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Source: (RMC, 2009) Source: Author’s transect walk (May, 2014)
  • 27. Land use Transport Infrastructure • Educational Facilities • Health Facilities • Recreational Facilities • Cultural Facilities • Water Supply • Sewage • Drainage • Solid Waste Social Amenities Basic Services • Density • Mixed Land Use • Road Network • NMT Infrastructure • IPT Infrastructure • PT Infrastructure
  • 28. T.P. Scheme Violation: Residential Housing made on the plots reserved for SEWS Housing, Library and Parks “Kayde sar bagicho bole chhe (201 vaar no) ne makaan banavi didhu chhe” Bakulbhai* 56 Lives in Triveninagar Society (LIG) WARD 20: LAND USE ISSUES *Names changed to withhold identity Source: (Focus Group Discussion, May 2014)
  • 29. “Mota mota makano ane hall ni akhi blank diwal ne karane, ghani choriyo thay”. “Lodheshwar ne badha backward area thi chori karva aave chhe loko”. -Vijaybhai*, 46 Lives in the Vinay Society (HIG) (Talks about how land use is affecting the safety of residents) "Aamari akhi sheri ma taklif, ame ekla to raate bahr na j nikadi shakiye, koi hoy j nai rasta par” -Jayshreeben*, 30 Lives in Haridwar Park Society (HIG) (Feels insecure in the society at night, due to lack of people on streets) Safety issues due to big plots Safety issues due to presence of illicit liquor brewing Lack of public Infrastructure due to industrial area *Names changed to withhold identity Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Source: (Focus Group Discussion, May 2014)
  • 30. "Kai suvidha nathi, makaan chhe ekla, rehvana”. -Hamirbhai*, 10 Lives in SEWS Housing (SEWS) (Feels that there is absolutely no facility provided except buildings) “Is area me daru baru sab milta hai, police ko mat batana, sabko pata hai, par chal raha hai. Isliye raat ko ghar se nikalne me bhay rehta hai” -Shantaben*, 36 Lives in Khodiyarnagar, next to Gitanagar Society (LIG) (Feels insecure due to the type of land use change at night) Land Use 1. Safety: Ladies feel unsafe at night due to some illegal activities as well as completely dark areas due to zoning of land uses in some parts. 2. Compatibility: Residential areas just next to Industrial area creates some conflicts as to children are not allowed going to school, passing from industrial areas.*Names changed to withhold identity Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Source: (Focus Group Discussion, May 2014)
  • 31. MEASURED ACCESSIBILITY: FOOTPATHS Parking along narrow footpaths Barriers of plantations Vendors along footpath Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Source: (Authors’ accessibility analysis, 2014)
  • 32. ArcGIS®ArcGIS® START NO. OF OPPORTUNITIES POPULATION •Ward-wise •Ward density NETWORK • Speeds •Congestion Index FISHNET • 200m x 200m (4 ha) ArcGIS® FLOWMAP • Distance matrix (between origins and destinations) •Origins •Destination •Network (with impedances) ORIGINS •People OPPORTUNITIES Education, health PROXIMITY COUNT POTENTIAL SCORE MODEL FlowMap® RESULTS ArcGIS® FlowMap® Data handling process for accessibility analysis
  • 33. MEASURED ACCESSIBILITY: IPT STOPS IPT parking at Guruprasad Chowk Random IPT parking Conflicting traffic Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Source: (Authors’ accessibility analysis, 2014)
  • 34. MEASURED ACCESSIBILITY: PT STOPS Bus running on Krishnanagar road New bus stop New bus stop without information Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Source: (Authors’ accessibility analysis, 2014)
  • 35. Poor, 69% Poor, 27% 8% Fair, 22% 10% Fair-good, 51% 13%City Ward 20 Accessibility to PT stops Poor, 62% Poor, 25% 11% 12% Fair-good, 22% Good, 15% Good, 53% City Ward 20 Accessibility to IPT stops COMPARISON OF WARD WITH CITY Source: (Authors’ accessibility analysis, 2014)
  • 36. “Bajaar chalta jaiye to vahano jode bhatkata hoiye, footpath par to gadiyo hoy” -Hansaben*, 40 Lives in Ambaji Kadva Plot (MIG), near Anand Mangla chowk (Speaking on the safety issues, while walking on the road) “Road to pehla bane, pachhi footpath bane ne ben, Footpath banave to amara ghar kapatar ma leshe” -Belaben*, 38 Lives in Triveninagar Society (LIG), near Guruprasad chowk (Stressing on the issue of road cutting, for making footpaths and the quality of infrastructure that lower income group gets) “Footpath chhe pan vahano park karela hoy, addho road to ema rokai jaay” “Cycle lane par pan vahano j park thayel hoy chhe, koi vaapri na shake” -Sureshbhai*, 56 Lives in Haridwar Park Society(HIG), near Panchsheel Hall (Speaking on the barriers of footpaths and cycle tracks, like Parking ) Non-Motorized Transport People have a tendency to walk for short trips like grocery shopping, religious trips and social trips (within 1-1.5km distance). Children of all socio-economic groups, also have a tendency to walk or cycle to school. People generally walk on the carriageway, instead of footpaths and cycle amidst the heavy traffic. 1. Safety: Ladies walking to markets, feel unsafe due to 2-wheelers and 3- wheelers hitting upon them. Even children are not allowed to cycle on arterial roads with heavy traffic. 2. Barriers: There are footpaths, but people feel that they are either obstructed by parallel parking on the roads or by vendors. 3. Land Security: People from LIG say that roads have been built before a year, how one would expect of a footpath. It is also felt that their houses might get cut, for making footpaths on sides. *Names changed to withhold identity Source: (Focus Group Discussion, May 2014)
  • 37. Geetanagar Evening Market Poor Condition of roads near SEWS Housing Footpath obstructed by street furniture Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT)
  • 38. Civil Hospital 5.0 Kms Lodheshwar Society (LIG_females) Mapping of local issues in progress Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Source: (Focus Group Discussion, May 2014)
  • 39. "Main road par chale bus, ahiya sudhi kai na aave, bau chalvu pade bus stop sudhi java” “Rickshaw ne badhu aa andar na road e kai na male” -Leelaben*, 55 Lives in Malviya Nagar Society (MIG), near Doshi Hospital (Speaking on the reachability to PT stops) “Dur java mate to bus sari pade pan kai khabar nathi, kya aave bus ne kyare aave, addhi kalak to ubha rehvu j pade” - Kamlaben*, 38 Lives in Lodheshwar Society (LIG) (Speaking on the lack of information about PT routes and its timings) “Chhet sudi to bus pohchade nai, rickshaw to levi j pade, ane bhada to sarkha j chhe, to rickshaw ma j na jaaiye” - Shobhanaben *, 42 Lives in Guruprasad Society(MIG) (Speaking on the connectivity and fares of PT & IPT) Public Transport (PT & IPT) Very few people in the discussions, used public transport for their commute and IPT works as a Public Transport for all income groups. New mini-buses are run by RMC but its mostly found empty, as people feel that IPT has better connectivity and fares. 1. Distance to Stops: For some internal areas, the distance to public transport stop increases and they rather use IPT. But societies like Vaid Wadi are also devoid of IPT connectivity. 2. End to End Connectivity: PT does not get to your destination and there is a change of mode to IPT. So for them, whole drive in autos is more comfortable, when the fares are also same. 3. Lack of Information: Most of LIG and SEWS people were unaware of the timings and frequency of new bus service. They felt it would have a lot of waiting time. *Names changed to withhold identity Source: (Focus Group Discussion, May 2014)
  • 40. Interaction with ladies from HIG families Interaction with males from LIG families Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT)
  • 41. Interaction with LIG men and women Water Supply “Paani no force nathi, vechatu mangavu j pade chhe, moti line nakhe to j kai thay” -Seemaben*, 46 lives in Ambaji Kadva Plot Society (MIG) (on the shortage of water supply) Sewage "Gutter saaf karne waala, 500 rupay maangta hai, sarkaar to karti nahi". -Kumudben*, 36 lives in SEWS quarter (on the affordability of being able to get the gutter cleaned, by themselves) *Names changed to withhold identity Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Source: (Focus Group Discussion, May 2014)
  • 42. A lady collecting water from one of the few standposts in Lodheshwar Society, Water collection from underground tanks in a LIG society Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT)
  • 43. Drainage “8-10 varash thi kahiye chhe ward office ma ke road level kari do, bau paani bharay chhe” “Chomasa ma machhar thi bimariyo thay chhokrao ne” -Sarojben*, 52 lives in Panchsheel Society (HIG) (on the never ending, water logging issue, and its impact on health) Solid Waste “Road saaf kari ne, kachra na dhagla j kare side ma” “Koik di aave, koi di na aave, vadva mate” -Jalpaben*, 48 lives in Lodheshwar Society (LIG) (On the situation of solid waste in the whole area) Interaction with LIG men *Names changed to withhold identity Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Source: (Focus Group Discussion, May 2014)
  • 44. Water logging and solid waste around the bin An open plot (public property) turned into a garbage dump Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT)
  • 45. MEASURED ACCESSIBILITY: EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES Source: (Authors’ accessibility analysis, 2014)
  • 46. Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Source: (Authors’ accessibility analysis, 2014)
  • 47. Fair, 60% Fair, 32% Fair-good, 35% Fair-good, 55% 5% 13% City Ward 20 Accessibility to primary schools Accessibility to pre-primary schools Poor, 21% 7% Fair, 66% Fair, 93% 12%City Ward 20 Poor, 19% Poor, 18% Fair, 46% Fair, 76% Fair-good, 22% 7% 13%City Ward 20 Accessibility to degree colleges MEASURED ACCESSIBILITY: EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES Accessibility to secondary schools Poor, 29% Poor, 62% Fair, 69% Fair, 38% City Ward 20 Source: (Authors’ accessibility analysis, 2014)
  • 48. Panchsheel School (used by MIG and HIG families) in the ward Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT)
  • 49. Degree College (PD Malviya College of Commerce) in the ward Government School no. 69 campus Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT)
  • 50. MEASURED ACCESSIBILITY: HEALTHCARE FACILITIES Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Source: (Authors’ accessibility analysis, 2014)
  • 51. 6% Poor, 18% Fair, 48% Fair, 82% Fair-good, 35% 11%City Ward 20 Fair, 63% Fair, 72% Fair-good, 22% Fair-good, 28% 15%City Ward 20 Poor, 90% Poor, 100% Fair, 10%City Ward 20 Accessibility to general (civil) hospital Accessibility to intermediate hospitals Accessibility to clinics MEASURED ACCESSIBILITY: HEALTHCARE FACILITIES Source: (Authors’ accessibility analysis, 2014)
  • 52. “I have had bad experiences with Doshi hospital. My father had an infection in the ear for a long time. Since we were not well-off then, its treatment had been put off for some time. Now that we had been doing well, I advised him to get it treated even if it were to cost us around twenty thousand rupees. When we took him to Doshi hospital, we were assured [by the doctor] that the treatment would be done in eight thousand rupees...all this happened around nine years ago...father was admitted in the hospital. When he was taken into the operation theatre, he suffered an [heart] attack and was admitted to the ICU. I suspect it was a case of overdose...the hospital authorities were not very cooperative or apologetic....felt like punching [them]”. -Dhananjaybhai*, 40 (on why he wouldn’t use the Doshi hospital nearby; choosing instead to go to the civil hospital five kilometres away) The residents of the ward found local clinics to be accessible, whenever they faced any health-related ailments. This was found to be true across high-income, middle- income, low-income and socio- economically weaker sections. Particularly among the LIG and SEWS groups, the civil hospital was considered to be a more attractive alternative to the local intermediate hospitals like Doshi and Shivanand mission. *Names changed to withhold identity Source: (Focus Group Discussion, May 2014)
  • 53. Doshi Hospital (Intermediate Hospital) in the ward A hospital used by MIG and HIG A dispensary in the ward Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Credits: Doshi Hospital website
  • 54. “Most of us are daily-wage earning workers who can not afford getting treatment there…we must therefore visit the civil hospital”. -Sujanbhai*, 50 Lives in Khodiyar Nagar with his wife and two children (Speaking on inability to afford treatment at local intermediate hospitals) “We visit the clinics only when we have slight fever; otherwise we prefer to get treatment at the civil hospital…even there we find it difficult as a result of our lack of knowledge of the local language”. -Mohammed Aziz*, 38 Lives in Samrat Industrial Area with his co-migrants from Bihar (Stressing on the impediment posed by lack of knowledge of local language) “The fees charged depends on the ailment being treated. [F]or fever and stomach-ache they charge forty to fifty rupees whereas for fractures, thousands may be charged”. -Laxmanbhai*, 52 Lives in Khodiyar Nagar with his wife and two married children (Speaking on the fees charged at local clinics without any regulation) Despite the presence of two major intermediate hospitals in the ward, the residents seemed to be more inclined towards using the Rajkot civil hospital: When asked for the reasons, the following responses came up frequently: 1. Affordability: The fees being charged (Rs. 100 entry outpatient registration) was beyond the affordability of most LIG and some MIG families. 2. Value for money: The (low) quality of services being offered do not justify the fees being charged, it was felt. Dhananjaybhai’s experience being one of many. 3. Language issues: Availing healthcare at Doshi is limited by lack of knowledge of local language for the many migrant workers employed in various establishments in Samrat Industrial Area. *Names changed to withhold identity Source: (Focus Group Discussion, May 2014)
  • 55. An interaction with migrant workers and mapping of local issues Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Source: (Focus Group Discussion, May 2014)
  • 56. Interaction with children from LIG families Interaction with children from SEWS quarters Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT)
  • 57. MEASURED ACCESSIBILITY: SOCIO-CULTURAL FACILITIES Source: (Authors’ accessibility analysis, 2014)
  • 58. The availability of two community halls in the ward does not help the residents as they are expensive. Also, Panchshil hall has now shut its doors to people outside the Panchshil society. The residents have however worked around these impediments through the following means: 1. Street-side celebrations: The SEWS and LIG families celebrate their weddings on the streets in their neighbourhood. 2. Look for other options: The HIG families are anyway not happy with facilities offered by Sagar hall. They look for halls elsewhere. “Yes, there are community halls in the ward…but I hired the Field Marshall hall in [neighbouring] Laxmi Nagar for my son’s wedding. It offers better facilities [than Sagar and Panchshil halls”. -Haren Patel*, 50 Owns a plywood shop on Gondal road and living in the ward for over eighteen years (Feels there are enough number of community halls in the ward but finds them to be of low quality) “The Corporation hall [at Guruprasad chowk] is never available during the marriage season…our turn never comes. The private halls charge between forty to fifty thousand rupees for a day [as rent]”. -Shivrajbhai*, 51 Lives in SEWS quarters in Samrat Industrial Area (Feels there is no chance for him to use a community hall for the wedding celebration of his son) Interaction with LIG senior citizens *Names changed to withhold identity Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT)
  • 59. “There’s Sagar Marriage Hall nearby… but it is expensive and marriage ceremonies usually are spread over one or two days. We hold them in our street… they have always been held here… it costs only around five thousand rupees for the pandal and food utensils. Not everybody’s going to get the corporation hall [at Guruprasad chowk]”. -Kishanbhai*, 73 Retired; lives in Gokuldham SEWS quarters with his wife (Speaking on the popular way of organizing wedding celebrations in his neighbourhood) A wedding procession in Khodiyar Nagar *Names changed to withhold identity Credits: Bhavna Vaddadi (CUE-CEPT) Source: (Focus Group Discussion, May 2014)
  • 60. Interaction with LIG women “We have no facilities [here]…all we have is our house…how do we think of things like a library?”. -Radhaben*, 36 lives in Lodheshwar with her husband and children (on the abysmal state of infrastructure in her locality) “If there’s the facility [of a library], why wouldn’t we [send our children there]?” -Jeevanbhai*, 45 lives in Lodheshwar with his wife and children and earns his livelihood as manual labour (aspirational and looking forward to seeing his children achieve greater success than him) *Names changed to withhold identity Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Source: (Focus Group Discussion, May 2014)
  • 61. The Panchshil park The Panchshil park is popular among the local MIG community. It attracts men, women and children of all ages from the nearby neighbourhoods. The Krishnanagar park The Panchshil park is a small park used by small children staying nearby. MEASURED ACCESSIBILITY: RECREATIONAL FACILITIES Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Source: (Authors’ accessibility analysis, 2014)
  • 62. Accessibility to parks and playgrounds Poor, 21% 6% Fair, 52% Fair, 62% Fair-good, 21% Fair-good, 32% 6%City Ward 20 Accessibility to libraries and reading rooms Poor, 80% Poor, 100% Fair, 13% 7%City Ward 20 Accessibility to community centres 7% 14% 78% 100% City Ward 20 MEASURED ACCESSIBILITY: RECREATIONAL FACILITIES Source: (Authors’ accessibility analysis, 2014)
  • 63. “There aren’t enough parks in our ward…even my kid used to play on the road only once in a while.” -Haren Patel*, 50 Owns a plywood shop on Gondal road and living in the ward for over eighteen years (Not very happy about the lack of parks and gardens in the ward) “There are no gardens or playgrounds here…we used to play there (pointing to the anganwadi) but now even that has been taken away from us [after the recent construction of the anganwadi] . We must now go to Anand Bungalow or PD Malviya college ground in order to play. We seldom go there…it’s unsafe…we play on the streets here”. -Rajkumar Hiteshbhai*, 14 Lives in the SEWS quarters near Gokuldham with his mother, father and sister. Says the young boy pointing to the recently built anganwadi which has robbed him and his young friends of the opportunity to play cricket in the neighbourhood open plot. *Names changed to withhold identity Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Source: (Focus Group Discussion, May 2014)
  • 64. “We have no parks or playground nearby…our children have to contend with playing on the road during vacations. We have demanded for a park in the adjacent [undeveloped] public plot since long”. -Suresh Kancharia*, 33 Lives in the SEWS quarters in Samrat Industrial Area (Feels there are aren’t any parks or playgrounds for the people of his neighbourhood) “We would love to see a park in our neighbourhood…[For] we would be able to play daily.” -Hiren Babaria*, 10 Lives with his parents and brother in Geeta Nagar (Feels there are aren’t any playgrounds for children like him to play in his neighbourhood) *Names changed to withhold identity Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Source: (Focus Group Discussion, May 2014)
  • 65. IDENTIFICATION OF ISSUES Streetlights "Aa main road bauj andhariyo chhe ne chowk akho andhariyo thai jaay chhe” Shilpaben*, 45 Lives in Gitanagar Society (HIG) Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT) Source: (Authors’ transect walk, May 2014)
  • 66. Open Plot Pictures Top: The public plot to the south of SEWS quarters lying unused being encroached as parking space by local industries. Bottom left: Another public plot lying unused near Guruprasad chowk next to a MIG-LMIG neighbourhood. Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT)
  • 67. PRIORITIZATION OF ISSUES Legend Source: (Focus Group Discussion, May 2014) Land use Transport Basic services Social amenities
  • 68. 1 F I E L D W O R K 2 PROPOSED METHODOLOGY Source: (CUE-CEPT, 2014) Using technical and participatory methods, identify ISSUES AND POTENTIALS. Break down OBJECTIVES into sub objectives. Device strategies to achieve SUB-OBJECTIVES. Using participatory techniques, help the community evolve a VISION. Also set OBJECTIVES to help evaluate the progress of the plan. Engage consultants/contractors to IMPLEMENT projects monitored by ward sabha. Use planning consultants to devise PROJECTS in order to achieve sub- objectives. Allow community to PRIORITIZE.
  • 69. ENVISION Transport Basicservices Socialamenities Landuse A vision is arrived at for the ward for a plan of horizon period of three to five years.  Participatory meetings convened for arriving at vision. “Liveable neighbourhood”
  • 70.  LANDUSE – Address incompatibility of land use, – Address safety issues rising out of poor land use planning.  TRANSPORT – Promote walking, NMT and IPT+PT, – Improve connectivity for Industrial Area.  BASIC SERVICES – Water-supply: Supply issues. – Sewerage: Address maintenance issues. – Solid Waste Management: Collection issues, disposal issues. – Storm Water Drainage: Address water –logging issues  SOCIO-CULTURAL AMENITIES – Address paucity of recreational spaces and public hospitals. DEVOLVING VISION INTO OBJECTIVES
  • 71. LAND USE CHANGES Ward Area: 2.05 sqkm Green Area: 0.02 sqkm Commercial Street Mixed Land Use
  • 72. TRANSPORT Road Length : 53 kms Commercial Street Mixed Land Use
  • 73. TRANSPORT 12m Road Section 9m Road Section
  • 74.  WATER-SUPPLY: SUPPLY ISSUES – Relay water supply pipelines that have gone bust. – Expand network in areas like Lodheshwar.  SEWERAGE: ADDRESS MAINTENANCE ISSUES. – Maintenance of sewer lines – Expand network to adjoining residential pockets of Samrat Industrial Area.  SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT: COLLECTION ISSUES, DISPOSAL ISSUES. – Regular collection (door-to-door) and bins to be monitored by ward sabhas.  STORM WATER DRAINAGE: ADDRESS WATER –LOGGING ISSUES – Issue can only be flagged for action at city level. BASIC SERVICES
  • 75.  PARKS – Plots reserved as per the TP for public purposes to be reclaimed from illegal dumping of construction waste SOCIAL AMENITIES Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT)
  • 76.  INTERMEDIATE HOSPITAL – Plot to the west of ST workshop – again reserved for public purposes - could be used for the purpose SOCIAL AMENITIES Credits: Tejas Patel / Vishal Darji (CUE-CEPT)
  • 77. COSTING
  • 78. PHASING
  • 79. 1 F I E L D W O R K 2 PROPOSED METHODOLOGY Source: (CUE-CEPT, 2014) Using technical and participatory methods, identify ISSUES AND POTENTIALS. Break down OBJECTIVES into sub objectives. Device strategies to achieve SUB-OBJECTIVES. Using participatory techniques, help the community evolve a VISION. Also set OBJECTIVES to help evaluate the progress of the plan. Engage consultants/contractors to IMPLEMENT projects monitored by ward sabha. Use planning consultants to devise PROJECTS in order to achieve sub- objectives. Allow community to PRIORITIZE.
  • 80.  Budget needs to be approved by making use of the ward sabha mechanism,  Major capital expenditure may then be included in next financial year’s budget,  Smaller projects like maintenance of parks, neighbourhoods may be undertaken with community participation,  Once contractors are engaged for neighbourhood level projects, monitoring can be carried out by the ward sabha itself,  Yearly documentation of the process will foster transparency, accountability and ownership among the ward residents. DELIVERY AND MONITORING
  • 81. THANKS

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