Curr 488 snapshot report

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Curr 488 snapshot report

  1. 1. Grade LevelFor this assignment, we decided to focus on third grade.Some characteristics of third graders include:8-9 years oldIntellectualLearn best through active, concrete experiencesEnjoy collecting, organizing, and classifying objects and informationImaginative play in form of skits, plays, and puppet showsLike groups and group activitiesMay reverse printed letters (b and d)Interested in different types of reading (fiction, non-fiction, magazines, “how-to” project books, information, etc.)Enjoy planning and buildingIncreasing vocabularyWhen something is suggested, they may say, “That‟s dumb.” or “I don‟t want todo that.”May show resistance to some suggestions Like to explain ideas, but they may exaggerateBasic skills begin to be mastered/Begin to feel a sense of competence withskillsTend to be negative (e.g. “This is boring,” “I can‟t do this,” etc.)
  2. 2. StandardsNew York State:Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, andspeak for literary response and expression.Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, andspeak for critical analysis and evaluation.Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, andspeak for social interaction.
  3. 3. StandardsCommon Core:RL.3.1: Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly tothe text as the basis for the answers.RL.3.2: Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine thecentral message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text.RL.3.3: Describe characters in a story (e.g. their traits, motivation, or feelings) and explain howtheir actions contribute to the sequence of events.RL.3.5: Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, usingterms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earliersections.RL.3.6: Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.RI.3.1: Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to thetext as the basis for the answers.RI.3.2: Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support themain idea.RI.3.7: Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a textto demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).SL.3.2: Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or informationpresented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.SL.3.4: Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts andrelevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.SL.3.6: Speak in complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to providerequested detail or clarification.
  4. 4. Reading ExpectationsSelect literature on the basis of personal needs and interests from avariety of genres and by different authorsEngage in purposeful oral reading in small and large groupsRelate the setting, plot, and characters in literature to own lives, withassistanceExplain the difference between fact and fictionUse previous reading and life experiences to understand and compareliteratureMake predictions, draw conclusions, and make inferences aboutevents and charactersIdentify cultural influences in texts and performances, with assistanceUse specific evidence from stories to describe characters, theiractions, and their motivations; relate sequences of events
  5. 5. Reading Expectations-2Use knowledge of story structure, story elements, and key vocabularyto interpret storiesSummarize main ideas and supporting details from imaginative texts,both orally and in writingEvaluate the content by identifyingThe author‟s purposeImportant and unimportant detailsWhether events, actions, characters, and/or settings are realisticStatements of fact and opinionCompare and contrast characters, plot, and setting in literary works,with assistanceAnalyze information on the basis of new or prior knowledge and/orpersonal experienceRespect the age, gender, social position, and cultural traditions of thewriterRecognize the types of language (e.g. informal vocabulary and jargon)that is appropriate to social communication
  6. 6. Reading Expectations-3Use a variety of structures to organizeand categorize text information.Cause and EffectComparing and ContrastingInformationSequencingComparing Story ElementsFact and OpinionDirectionsTime SequenceEngage in or lead discussion aboutgrade-level texts by integrating multiplestrategies.Ask QuestionsClarify MisunderstandingsSupport Point of ViewSummarize InformationUse genre features to aid comprehension.Folk TalesLegendsFablesBiographiesPoetryPlaysStoriesUse knowledge of the structure ofimaginative text to identify and interpret plot,character, point of view (first and third person)Demonstrate comprehension of grade-leveltext through creative responses.WritingDramaOral PresentationUse text information to support point of view.
  7. 7. Types of TextsUsedStories:Gannett, Ruth Stiles. My Father’sDragonAverill, Esther. The Fire CatSteig, Wiliam. Amos & BorisShulevitz, Uri. The TreasureCameron, Ann. The Stories JulianTellsMacLachlan, Patricia. Sarah, Plainand TallRylant, Cynthia. Henry and Mudge:The First Book of AdventuresStevens, Janet. Tops and BottomsLaMarche, Jim. The RaftRylant, Cynthia. The LighthouseFamily: The StormOsborne, Mary Pope. The One-Eyed Giant (Book One of Tales fromthe Odyssey)Silverman, Erica. Cowgirl Kate andCocoaPoetry:Dickinson, Emily. “Autumn.”Rossetti, Christina. “Who Has Seenthe Wind?”Millay, Edna St. Vincent. “Afternoonon a Hill.”Frost, Robert. “Stopping by Woodson a Snowy Evening.”Field, Rachel. “Something Told theWild Geese.”Hughes, Langston. “Grandpa’sStories.”Jarrell, Randall. “A Bat Is Born.”Giovanni, Nikki. “Knoxville,Tennessee.”Merriam, Eve. “Weather.”Soto, Gary. “Eating While Reading.”
  8. 8. Types of TextsUsedRead-Aloud Stories:Kipling, Rudyard. “How the CamelGot His Hump.”Thurber, James. The ThirteenClocksWhite, E. B. Charlotte’s WebSelden, George. The Cricket inTimes SquareBabbitt, Natalie. The Search forDeliciousCurtis, Christopher Paul. Bud, NotBuddySay, Allen. The Sign PainterRead-Aloud Poetry:Lear, Edward. “The Jumblies.”Browning, Robert. The Pied Piperof HamelinJohnson, Georgia Douglas. “YourWorld.”Eliot, T. S. “The Song of theJellicles.”Fleischman, Paul. “Fireflies.”
  9. 9. Types of Texts UsedInformational Texts:Aliki. A Medieval FeastGibbons, Gail. From Seed to PlantMilton, Joyce. Bats: Creatures of theNightBeeler, Selby. Throw Your Tooth on theRoof:Tooth Traditions Around the WorldLeonard, Heather. Art Around the WorldRuffin, Frances E. Martin Luther Kingand the March on WashingtonSt. George, Judith. So You Want to BePresident?Einspruch, Andrew. CrittercamKudlinski, Kathleen V. Boy, Were WeWrong About DinosaursDavies, Nicola. Bat Loves the NightFloca, Brian. Moonshot: The Flight ofApollo 11Thomson, Sarah L. Where Do PolarBears Live?Read-Aloud Informational Texts:Freedman, Russell. Lincoln: APhotobiographyColes, Robert. The Story of RubyBridgesWick, Walter. A Drop of Water: A Book ofScience and WonderSmith, David J. If the World Were aVillage:A Book about the World’s PeopleAliki. Ah, Music!Mark, Jan. The Museum Book:A Guide to Strange and WonderfulCollectionsD’Aluisio, Faith. What the World EatsArnosky, Jim. Wild Tracks! A Guide toNature’s FootprintsDeedy, Carmen Agra. 14 Cows forAmerica
  10. 10. Examples of Text Questions andResponsesBefore (example questions)What did the author/illustrator do to get you interested in the book? (All)“The title makes me think about a time I went to the beach and built asandcastle. I had a lot of fun, so I am excited to read about it in the book.”What do you know about where and when the story takes place? (Fiction)“I see a beach in the pictures, so I know that the story takes place on abeach by some water. It looks like it is during the day because I see the sunshining. It is probably summer because I go to the beach during thesummer with my family.”What have you discovered about the main character(s) so far? (Fiction)Do you have any hunches about what might happen next? (Fiction)What do you want to learn from this book? (Non-Fiction)Standards: RI.3.7: Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps,photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text(e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).
  11. 11. Examples of Text Questions andResponsesDuring (example questions)What happened in the story that surprised you? (Fiction)“I thought the character was a boy the whole time because it was about abully in school, but it ended up being a girl!”If you could speak to one of the characters in your book, what might you sayto them? (Fiction)“I would like to ask the boy what his favorite baseball team is because hesays he likes baseball in the book.”In what ways has the main character changed since the beginning of thebook? Why? (Fiction)What is the main problem in the story? (Fiction)Does the author include opinion and fact statements into the book? Findexamples of each. (Non-Fiction)Standards:RL.3.1: Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text,referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.RL.3.3: Describe characters in a story (e.g. their traits, motivation, or feelings)and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.
  12. 12. Examples of Text Questions andResponsesAfter (example questions)Is the title a good choice for this book? Why or why not? What would be anothergood title? Why? (All)“I think the title, „Charlotte‟s Web,‟ is a good one because Charlotte is themain character and she writes messages in her web. It could also be called„Charlotte and Wilbur‟ because Wilbur is another important character in thebook.”Did the story end the way you expected it to? Why or why not? (Fiction)“I did not think Charlotte would die at the end of the book, so that surprisedme. She was so important so I did not think the author would have that happen.”What can you imagine will happen to the character(s) after the story ended? Whydo you think so? (Fiction)Did the book leave you with unanswered questions? What are these? (All)If you could talk to the author, what would you say and ask? (All)Standards: RL.3.1: Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text,referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.RL.3.3: Describe characters in a story (e.g. their traits, motivation, or feelings) and explainhow their actions contribute to the sequence of events.RL.3.6: Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of thecharacters.Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.
  13. 13. Examples of Text Questions andResponsesAnother form of response is making text-to-self,text-to-text, and text-to-world connections.Examples of responses/worksheetsText-to-SelfPossible Questions:What does this story remind you of?Can you relate to the characters in the story?Does anything in this story remind you of anything in your own life?A third grader might respond to “Love that Dog” by Sharon Creech by sayinghow he had a dog that he loved but passed away. He may also write his ownpoem about his dog to go along with the book.Standards:RL.3.6: Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those ofthe characters.Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis andevaluation.
  14. 14. http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/sites/default/files/posts/u133/pdfs/that_reminds_me.pdf
  15. 15. Examples of Text Questions andResponsesText-to-TextPossible Questions:What does this remind you of in another book you have read?How is this text similar to other things you have read?How is this text different from other things you have read?A third grader might compare and contrast the original “Three Little Pigs” to“The True Story of the Three Little Pigs” using a Venn diagram or otherworksheet.Standards:RL.3.2: Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diversecultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it isconveyed through key details in the text.Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis andevaluation
  16. 16. http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/sites/default/files/posts/u133/pdfs/comparing_stories.pdf
  17. 17. Examples of Text Questions andResponsesText-to-WorldPossible Questions:What does this remind you of in the real world?How are events in this story similar to things that happen in the realworld?How are events in this story different from things that happen in the realworld?A third grader might compare the book, “Earthquake (The Magic School Bus tothe Rescue),” by Joanna Cole, to the disaster in Haiti (or any other earthquakethey are familiar with), applying it to the events that occur in the book.Standards:RL.3.6: Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those ofthe characters.Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis andevaluation.
  18. 18. Examples of Text Questions andResponsesThere are many different forms of ReaderResponse you can use in a 3rd grade classroom.We included some general examples teachers canuse for any text. Some other examples mightinclude: reader‟s theater, reading response blogs,reading tweets (students have to respond to thebook in 30 words or less), reader response tic-tac-toe (students have several choices of ways torespond to the text, they choose which activity tocomplete), and there are many other options youcan use. Take some time to explore everything thatis out there!
  19. 19. AnalysisFrom our findings we have realized how much reader response has to offer in the thirdgrade. There are endless ways to present this educational tool, and we were only able to reallyscratch the surface of it. Overall we feel that reader response in third grade is a great resourcefor teachers to use. From our own experiences we have realized how much students vary intheir learning styles, and reader response offers a variety of ways to reach each student andhis or her unique needs. By making text-to-self, text-to-text, and text-to-world connections,students are able to pull on their background knowledge and personal experiences to gainmeaning and understanding on a deeper level than they would without making any comparisonsor connections. Also, by asking questions and obtaining responses from students before,during, and after reading, students are able to remain connected and inquisitive in all aspectsof the reading process. They are constantly thinking, asking questions, and analyzing what theyare reading, instead of just simply filling out a worksheet, for example, post-reading.Spiegel (1998) discusses the importance of making meaning from reading, and there areseveral modes of doing this. Discussion is one of the ways the author mentions in order to gainunderstanding and interpret what has been read. Spiegel (1998) also emphasizes theimportance of personal connections to the text. She notes that each student will have differentresponses and opinions, and each one should be valued and accepted, as this helps makemeaning and understanding.The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) emphasize the use of multiple literacies andtexts. It is important for teachers to introduce these various forms to students in order to makethem well rounded, as well as bring them to discover their own strengths and weaknesseswithin the different text forms. The expectations of third grade reader response requirestudents to dig deeper, going beyond what is directly in front of them and bringing them to workin a variety of ways, including group and independently, to reach conclusions and prepare formore advanced ways of thinking.
  20. 20. ReferencesCommon Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies,Science, and Technical Subjects. (2013). Appendix b: Text exemplars and sample performancetasks. Retrieved from http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Appendix_B.pdf.GCISD. (2002). Developmental characteristics of third graders. Retrievedfromhttp://www.glendale.k12.wi.us/3_char.aspx.International Reading Association. (2013). Making connections . Retrieved fromhttp://www.readwritethink.org/professional-development/strategy-guides/making-connections-30659.html.New York State Education Department. (2005). English language arts core curriculum: Grade 3.Retrieved from http://www.p12.nysed.gov/ciai/ela/elacore.htm.New York State P-12 Common Core Learning Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy.(2013).Standards for english language arts & literacy in history/social studies, science, and technicalsubjects. Retrievedfromhttp://www.p12.nysed.gov/ciai/common_core_standards/pdfdocs/p12_common_core_learning_standards_ela.pdf.Oswego City School District. (2011). Elementary test prep ela3. Retrieved fromhttp://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ela3.cfm.Scholastic Inc. (2013). Five minute reading responses. Retrieved fromhttp://www.scholastic.com/teachers/top-teaching/2013/02/five-minute-reading-responses.Zimmerman, A. (2013). Third grade reading response questions. Retrieved fromhttp://www.alyciazimmerman.com/uploads/3/0/7/3/3073052/reading_response_questions.pdf.

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