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Emergency fuel plan briefing may 2010
 

Emergency fuel plan briefing may 2010

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    Emergency fuel plan briefing may 2010 Emergency fuel plan briefing may 2010 Presentation Transcript

    • EMERGENCY FUEL PLANS Michael Grant Manager, Chatham County Fleet Operations 0
    • Introduction
      • Following a catastrophic event such as a hurricane which will have wide spread effects in our region, fuel resources and the distribution infrastructure remaining to support recovery efforts may be limited or unavailable.
      • Despite conditions, emergency response personnel will be required to deploy into the affected area and begin Search & Rescue Operations and Recovery Efforts.
      • In addition to local responders, the influx of emergency
      • resources from outside the region to support a long-term recovery will place additional burdens on the already limited, if nonexistent, local resources.
      1
    • Purpose The purpose of this workshop is to present planning considerations for maintaining an adequate supply of petroleum, oil, and lubricant (POL) products to support emergency response operations during local emergencies and/or following a catastrophic event/major disaster. 2
    • Scope
      • Fuel procurement and distribution procedures follow established local jurisdictional and individual agency Standard Operating Procedures (SOP).
      • Local jurisdictions and agencies may establish additional and/or temporary procurement and distribution procedures and facilities as needed.
      • Fuel management procedures are established by local jurisdictions as needed during an emergency event.
      3
      • FEDERAL :
        • National Response Framework (NRF)
        • October 2008,as amended
        • Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and
        • Emergence Assistance Act
      • STATE :
        • Georgia Constitution
        • Georgia Emergency Management
        • Act of 1981, as amended
        • Georgia Emergency Operations Plan (GEOP)
      • COUNTY : County EOP
      The Chatham County Emergency Fuel, Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricants Management Plan was developed using the following references: 4
    • Assumptions
      • Appropriate Emergency Declarations are made when warranted
      • Management procedures outlined in this plan apply to POL products required by agencies (local and out of area, government and/or nongovernment), responding to a local or County-wide emergency event
      • During local emergency events, fuel management and planning is the responsibility of the responsible jurisdiction
      • During local emergency events, established in-ground fuel stores (fixed sites), remain available and the supply from local distributors is uninterrupted
      5
    • Assumptions (Continued)
      • Following a catastrophic event and/or major disaster, fuel management is coordinated through the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) by the ESF-1 Ground Support Unit
      • Following a catastrophic event and/or major disaster, the supply of fuel from the local refiner to the contracted distributor/vendor is uninterrupted (interrupted)
      • Following a catastrophic event and/or major disaster, contracted fuel distributors have (do not have) sufficient resources to meet local contract requirements
      • Following a catastrophic event and/or major disaster, responsible agencies conduct quality checks of in-ground fuel stores prior to dispensing
      6
    • Assumptions (Continued)
      • Emergency fuel management operations may last for many days or weeks until local services and fuel sites are restored
      • This plan does not include provisions to provide fuel to the general population during or following an emergency event
      • Both of the terms “fuel” and “POL” may be used when referencing this plan. If necessary, specific products are identified and additional management requirements noted.
      7
    • Concept of Operations Supply
      • Jurisdictions maintain a daily supply of fuel sufficient to support “routine” fire response, emergency medical services, law enforcement, and public works, activities. Remember, the established daily supply is the amount of fuel and other POL require for daily operations. This amount will vary from agency to agency, primarily due to the agencies’ size, non-standard equipment, and the consumption/burn rates of fuel being used by different equipment
      • During local emergencies, if an agency’s fuel resources are exhausted and supplies through established procedures (including mutual aid agreements and local purchase) are unavailable ; additional fuel may be requested through EMA.
      8
      • Fuel management plans put in place during any emergency event are supplemental to the established local policies and procedures previously mentioned
      • Contracts are maintain with designated vendors to provide additional emergency deliveries of gasoline and diesel fuels to all participating agencies during a catastrophic event and/or major disaster. This contract is reviewed on an annual basis
      • During a significant emergency event, if the supply of fuels from the contracted vendor are unavailable and/or become exhausted; request the required operational fuel resources the state through the EOC.
      Concept of Operations (continued) Supply (Continued) 9
      • During local emergencies , fuel management and planning is conducted by the appropriate jurisdiction and/or local agency .
        • This includes utilization of mutual aid agreements and
        • local purchases (if necessary)
        • Once local fuel resources and mutual aid agreements
        • have been exhausted, and local purchases are no
        • longer an option, additional fuel resources may be
        • coordinated through EMA.
      Concept of Operations (continued) Direction and Coordination 10
      • Catastrophic events and/or major disasters generally result in the activations of County and State Emergency Operations Centers.
        • The magnitude of these events and the scope of the
        • required response will quickly overwhelm and deplete
        • local fuel resources at all levels
        • Within the EOC functional sections, designated ESF
        • Partners are available to assist jurisdictions coordinate a
        • fuel management plan for the incident.
      Concept of Operations (continued) Direction and Coordination (continued) 11
      • The size and scope of the emergency response is driven by the severity of the incident
      • Fuel availability and the need for POL planning may not be critical during a local emergency requiring a minimal response
      • However, if the response is significant with several resources involved, the need for fuel and an incident POL plan may become critical
      • Whenever any incident of critical significance occurs, the need for fuel/POL must be determined by considering several factors.
      Concept of Operations (continued) Determining Fuel Needs 12
      • These factors include but are not limited to:
        • The type(s) and number(s) of vehicles and/or equipment
        • involved during the response
        • The anticipated duration of the response
        • Anticipate POL consumption (burn) rates
        • The amount of available POL on hand with the
        • responders
        • The location of the center of response activities in
        • relationship to fuel points.
      Concept of Operations (continued) Determining Fuel Needs (continued) 13
      • During a local emergency when local fuel resources and mutual aid agreements are or near exhaustion , the Incident Commander (IC) may contact the local EMA to request additional fuel resources
      • Example: The IC contacts the CEMA Duty Officer who coordinates with the County’s Primary Fuel Coordinator
      • (Fleet Operations Manager) to determine if support from the County’s POL inventory is available; and/or the possibility of procuring additional resources through established purchasing procedures.
      Concept of Operations (continued) Requests for POL and Procurement 14
      • Fuel management for more significant events is coordinated by the Primary Fuel Coordinator or the appropriate functional section working within the County EOC
      • Upon County and municipal fuel resources being exhausted , the PFC may request additional fuel resources through the State Operations Center (SOC).
      Concept of Operations (continued) Requests for POL and Procurement (continued) 15
      • Requested fuel and POL resources are likely to arrive via a variety of carriers (ground, rail, and air); and in various forms of bulk packaging (cases, barrels, tank-wagons).
      • Coordination must be made for all incoming fuel to be delivered to either established fuel points or to specific temporary locations for storage and/or distribution
      • Established Fuel Points (fixed sites). The affected jurisdiction may have a number of established fuel points in equipped with large, in-ground storage tanks. When practical, incoming fuel resources will be sent directly to these established fuel points for general distribution.
      Concept of Operations (continued) Storage and Distribution 16
      • Temporary Fuel Points (Mobile Capabilities). Temporary fuel points may be established to distribute fuel directly from ‘tank-wagons’
      • Gravity fed tank-wagons provide the capability to transport and dispense bulk fuel resources where they are needed without having to rely on the established fuel points
      • Tank-wagons are also an additional method of storing bulk fuel on a temporary basis (as the case would be at the LSA or Base Camp). These mobile fueling operations may require the end user to consider additional fire safety and security measures.
      Concept of Operations (continued) Storage and Distribution (continued) 17
      • During local emergencies, agencies follow established procedures for receiving and accounting for fuel and other POL products
      • When local fuel resources are expended, established procedures may provide for support either on a one-time need or a temporary support basis.
      Concept of Operations (continued) Accountability 18
      • One – Time Need :
      • EMA coordinates with the Primary Fuel Coordinator to authorize a one-time distribution of fuel from available resources to the requesting agency.
      • The fuel dispensed will be accounted for in accordance with instructions provided by the Primary Fuel Coordinator as it pertains to the event
      • The Primary Fuel Coordinator then follows established accountability procedures to ensure appropriate cost recovery from the agency and/or agencies for the fuel issued.
      Concept of Operations (continued) Accountability (continued) 19
      • Temporary Support :
      • The Primary Fuel Coordinator may establish temporary accounts allowing local and/or agencies from out of the area, temporary access to the available fuel supply
      • Fuel dispensed will be accounted for electronically or manually (as available)
      • The Primary Fuel Coordinator then follows established accountability procedures to ensure appropriate cost recovery from the agency and/or agencies for the fuel issued.
      Concept of Operations (continued) Accountability (continued) 20
    • All fuel and other POL products procured for the emergency response but no longer needed, and that can not be consumed through normal use, are to be disposed of in accordance with local SOPs and guidelines established by the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and State Environmental Protection Division (EPD). Recovery 21
    • Remember …… When a disaster occurs, one of the primary resources needed to ensure a rapid response and to begin recovery operations is fuel. Whether it is law enforcement, search and rescue teams, public works / utility restoration crews, or other emergency officials; without the fuel to operate the equipment needed to reach those in danger, and/or to start the repair/rebuild and recovery processes, the effects of a disaster are magnified. 22
    • 23
    • Michael Grant Manager, Chatham County Fleet Operations (912) 652-6875 [email_address] Don Sullens Emergency Management Specialist Chatham Emergency Management Agency (912) 201-4500 [email_address] 24