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Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev
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Cta1100 ps lesson 6 powerpointrev

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Million Dollar Idea speech info and overview.

Million Dollar Idea speech info and overview.

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  • Just to clarify the speech is asking, “What would you do if you could spend $1 million?” Your speech must be 5 to 10 minutes. All through the semester we've been working toward this point were you get excited about something that you're passionate about. Where does your passion lay, if you could wake up tomorrow and do anything you wanted for profession what would it be?   A lot of people would start their own business or nonprofit organization. A lot of people would give money to charity, become a philanthropist. Some people would make a movie. Some people would launch a photography career. Whatever the case may be, given $1 million, most people think that capital is the main stumbling block preventing them from achieving their dreams. We are looking to take that off the table and I'd like you to do the hard work of preparing a speech about what you would do if you had $1 million.
  • Now some people would probably quit their job and just figure out an awesome way to spend $1 million and if that's what you want to do your speech about by all means. It just has to be organized, has to use the skills we've learned throughout the term in our public speaking class. First of all, you're going to need to do some research now that you have this million dollars. You need to come up with the topic; think of something that you're passionate about, that you would want to spend $1 million on.  Brainstorming is a great idea. you write down some ideas, some directions where should this million dollars take you and as soon as you think you have a good topic, you must do some research on that topic. Research will be an important part of this and the exercises that we have in this lesson are to help you to do the legwork for the execution of the speech.
  • You have to imagine that you're presenting the speech to a room full of people who are signing the check for the million dollars. You want to look like a business person. Now if you're planning on quitting your job and you usually dress for success and you want to wear a Jimmy Buffett or Hawaiian clothing and shorts because it's time to celebrate getting the million dollars and you find a way to justify that choice, that conscious decision for your dress, then you know I'm an open-minded instructor.  But the main idea is that I want you to pay attention to the details of your public persona which would include your hygiene. Everybody's got great hygiene as it is but attire , the appropriateness of your attire for the speech itself. In my class I instruct people about what formal, business formal and business casual attire looks like. We have pictures and all that stuff and of course you can go to Google Images and type in business professional attire and you start to see what that means.   But by no means, I don’t want anybody to go out shopping and say my teacher said that if I don't look awesome on this video that I made for my speech that I'm going to get points taken off my speech. I am not condoning going out and buying anything new. Take a look at what you've got already. Most people have plenty of the notes dress for success clothing. But let's talk a little bit more about what professional dress might mean as long as we are on the subject.
  • If you want to make a good first impression, dress for success. Now it can mean a lot of things to a lot of different people and I want you to use your discretion . I've seen some speeches of everybody's done by now. I want to notice a difference between what you wear for everyday clothing and then what you would wear for the million-dollar speech.
  • So some specific examples for men. You know if you wear khakis, dress pants and a nice shirt, knotted tie, dress shoes. Now of course I'm not I'm not expecting to see the entire body shot with the shoes you're wearing. A lot of the WebCams just cannot view you from the waist up, or from the chest up or whatever and that's okay. But there is an expression, “look good, feel good” and I guarantee you, if you prepare for the speech, do your research, have an idea you're passionate about, and then the morning or the afternoon you can record your speech, you have an audience that you've invited to the speech as part of the criteria as well.  If you dress up it's good. You're going to feel it and there's I don't know what I can say academically about it other than it is true, that when you wear clothing that you don't normally wear, you know that you look sharp. You feel a little sharper.  So here are some examples of the gentleman that are dressed to impress and if you guys if you don't own any of these clothes fine like I said I don't like you to go out and buy new clothes. I’m saying to the best of your ability and the best of your wardrobe act as if this is a real situation.
  • And ladies again khakis awesome, dress pants, skirt, professional top; you know, this is out of the book. We looked around and tried to find some good examples of professional attire and these are some examples if you're interested.  
  • Now I've included this slide just because it is also in the book talking about hygiene, attire, and appropriateness. This is just some good practical information. There are things that you might want to do if you're going to be in a situation like this, or a job interview, or when you're going to maybe pitch an idea may be an inventor, anything you can do to be professional clean cut and appropriate for the situation place and audience that you find yourself in. So just some practical tips pretty much common sense everybody knows this, but it's in the book and it's good information.
  • When you give these final speeches I think it'll be interesting to see how your fellow students respond to your attire. Hopefully it will be good anecdotal evidence of it actually is meaningful. What you wear does have an impact on the way you are perceived.  Moving right along, you’re going to want a very nicely developed speech outline for this. You'll be submitting one. We've made progressively more developed outlines throughout the term, but this is going to be your Magna Carta speech outline based on what we've been learning throughout the term. You need to develop a really solid outline and there are plenty of examples of what a good outline looks like in the book. Some of the reading I've assigned has included outlines for different occasions but remember you're not writing a manuscript for the speech, you’re writing an outline. Some of your outlines will closely resemble a manuscript and some public speaking teachers will try to steer you away from manuscript speeches, I don't feel that way. I think some people can go up with a few notes on a card and give a great speech because a good extemporaneous speakers. But some people in order to overcome their stage fright, inhibitions for public speaking, if they didn't know that they had the comfort and security of looking down and seeing sort of paragraph for paragraph of what they want to say, they might overall give a far less effective speech because they’ll spend the whole time terrified.  I don't like that. Some people are great readers. We don't want to fall into the habit of reading your speech because that’s not a speech, that’s reading. But if you've got a good reading voice and it's going to increase your comfort, I say get some stuff on paper. We still want to follow in outline format. I don't want you to submit a document to me that is a word for word reiteration of your speech, that's a transcription or reverse transcription. I would like to see evidence that you are actually giving a speech not reading.
  • So the key to a good speech is to start with a good clear outline. We say typed if you got great penmanship and you don't have a printer, you might want to write your outline on note cards. Of course you want to have that introduction, body, and conclusion. That introduction, you want to have a thesis and a kind of a clear thesis statement. One or two sentences that really describes, what's at the heart of your speech. What’s at the heart of your passion in this case and what you want to spend money on. It is good to flesh out as clearly as possible what you're going to be speaking about in the speech. Preparation is going to be everything for this speech. The assignments and the tools in this lesson should prepare you for that endeavor.
  • An outline should be set up like an essay with an introduction, body, and conclusion. Your outline should have a different point for each body paragraph. We said in the body of your speech it’s good to have three points that you want to make. Three is a good number. Some people want to make more, some people try to make less ,but really good body has three main points in my experience. Depending on how specific you details get you want to make sub points. How many times you indent if your body has main points A, B, and C. Maybe A is going to have some sub roman numerals that you like to flash out just to drive that first point home.  This slide is a bit of an outline, right? It’s got the title, speech outline. The outline should be set up exactly like an essay. There is three points and then there are a couple of bullets at the end. Some outlines look really neat like a really complicated primer. In giving a 5 to 10 minute speech based on your passion and how you're going to spend money; I imagine these outlines are going to look kind of intense. So again refer to the book for how to create a good outline. I've got an example in the next slide, maybe we should take a look at.
  • Remember that when you include a lot of useful research in your presentation, it will make the audience think you know a lot about your topic. It’ll be easy to organize that material. It will give you the confidence to talk about the issues in your speech. The more research you have, the better your speech will be. Just remember were building these outlines so that you have an organized approach to your speech. But the research is what is going to make the outline strong. So make sure to follow the sort of pattern research, outline, speak.
  • Here is an introduction, with two points there, then there is a body, and there's another part of the body, and then there's a conclusion. I wouldn't say copy this, paste it into a document, and begin developing your speech outline. This is just an idea of what it’s going to look like, and this is a very simple speech outline. Hopefully your outline will look better than this.
  • Most of our speeches are given in the classroom. For this final speech I bring people to the Mitchell Auditorium. I set up the presidential podium so that the students can speak into a microphone and address …I think there is at least 400 seats in the place. So it’s a big room and with the microphone, and with the preparation, with the professional dress, it really creates this feeling that transcends the classroom.  I would encourage you if you have the ambition to go to a place that isn't the usual WebCam recording spot. Maybe you have access to a conference room or something like that. It's not mandatory but you want to do what you can to feel like it's not just going through the motions, right. One thing that the people in the Mitchell Auditorium,( my students) , don't get to do in the final speech is use audiovisual aids on an overhead projector, because we don't have an overhead projector set up in that room. So people distribute brochures and things like that.  You however, can use if you like an audiovisual aid. Referring back to the sort of way we did the audiovisual speeches. So people do like to see audiovisual enhancements in a speech. It is not mandatory for the speech, but it might be something you would like to incorporate and because you’re electronic class, you can use your savvy in the education that we've done so far, to make your speech as good as it can be.
  • If you are going to incorporate some sort of powerpoint or visual aid into your speech, just remember you don't want the audiovisual stuff too convoluted the message that you're trying to make.  So you want to use good clear fonts, and bullet points, don't put up a treaties for a visual aid, let it enhance not distract from your speech. Some of you really are good at knowing how to turn power points into a format that we can use this electronic setting. I encourage you to use your imagination and don't go to more trouble than it's going to be worth for a speech. If you know a good clip that you would like to show as an example of your organization, or the thing that you like to do let’s say you want to make a movie, or maybe there's somebody out there who is an idol or appear and you can show a clip from something they been working on, and say I like to do something like this.  Whatever you decide just keep in mind it's not mandatory and you don't want it to take away from your hard work on the speech.
  • Some of this is review now that we've done the audiovisual speeches. You can see yes, this is how they can be used, and how they should be used. Just thought I would put this slide up for your review.
  • The ending: end your speech effectively by either restating your introduction or offering a summary of what you just told the audience. As I've said several times don't end with “and that’s about it.” End with a quote. End with some kind of advice. End with a closing argument.  These people are going to give you a million dollars to carry out your passion. You can leave them with something that will stick out in their minds as a good reason for signing that check. I repeat do not end your speech with the words “and that's about it”. If you do nothing else this whole semester at the end of this last speech write a strong conclusion. Write a strong conclusion to the speech and memorize it and end on a strong note.  
  • Transcript

    • 1. Public Speaking CTA 1100 Public Speaking: Lesson 6 The Million Dollar Speech
    • 2. Public SpeakingThe Prompt• Just to clarify, this speech is asking, “What would you do if you could spend $1 million?”• The speech must be five to ten minutes long.
    • 3. Public SpeakingResearch• First of all, you need to come up with a topic. Think of something that you are passionate about and would want to spend a million dollars on.• Brainstorming can be very useful to narrow down ideas.• Secondly do some research on your topic
    • 4. Public SpeakingDress Criteria• When giving a presentation, going into the workplace, or going to an interview one must “dress for success.”• This includes: 1. Hygiene 2. Attire 3. The appropriateness of your attire for your occasion.
    • 5. Public SpeakingProper Attire• DRESS FOR SUCCESS!!!!• Wear clothes that are sophisticated
    • 6. Public SpeakingDress for Men• Khaki or Dress pants• A nice shirt (not a t-shirt)• Dress shoes• All presentable 
    • 7. Public SpeakingDress for Women• Either khaki‟s, dress pants, or a skirt.• A professional top (keep the cleavage under control)• Dressy shoes (no sneakers!)
    • 8. Public SpeakingHygiene, Attire, & Appropriateness Attire Hygiene: • Professional • Brush your teeth • Modest • Brush your hair • Clean-cut • Be showered • Not wild • Fix your hair • Classy • Smell good, but not too • Matches strong • Neutral colors • Trim fingernails and Appropriateness facial hair • Modest • Have good breath • Appropriate for the • Wash your face situation, place, audience • Avoid heavy make-up • Something that is comfortable for you to sit in
    • 9. Public SpeakingSpeech Outline• An outline is a guideline for yourself that you will use when you go to write your speech.• An outline should: 1. Use different symbols for each point. 2. Not contain full sentences. 3. Use 1-3 words for general topics• The more specific the longer it can get.• Use the specifics once you are trying to go into depth when writing your speech.
    • 10. Public SpeakingOutline• The key to a good speech is to have a good clear typed outline.• Structure your speech with an introduction, a body, and a conclusion.• This means it is a good idea to write or type out your speech first.
    • 11. Public SpeakingSpeech OutlineThe outline should be set up exactly like an essay: 1. Introduction 2. Body 3. Conclusion• Your outline should have a different „point‟ for each body paragraph.• Depending on how specific your details get, determines how many times you indent each correlating point.
    • 12. Public SpeakingOutline• Be sure to include as much useful research as you can in the presentation.• Also the more you know about your topic, the easier it will be to clearly organize and talk about your speech• The more good research you have on your topic, the better your speech will be!• (and the more applause you will get!)
    • 13. Public SpeakingSpeech Outline: Example I. Introduction- No indent A. One indent (tab) B. II. Body- No indent A. One indent (tab) 1. two indents (tab) 2. a. three indents (tab) B. III. Conclusion A. B. 1. 2.
    • 14. Public SpeakingAudio/Visual aid• It is a fact that most people learn better when they have something to look at or something to listen to.• Try to incorporate a visual or audio aid into your presentation when possible.
    • 15. Public SpeakingVisual aids• If you are thinking about a poster or PowerPoint of some sort keep in mind the keys to a good visual aid.
    • 16. Public SpeakingAudio & Visual AidsAudio aids are things like: Visual Aids include: • Music • Handouts/Brochure • Sound bites • Maps • Singing • 2-D and/or 3-D models • Musical Instruments • Videos • Clapping/snapping • Charts/Diagrams • Video • Graphs • The object you are speaking about • Food • Pictures • And more
    • 17. Public SpeakingAudio & Visual Aids• Audio and visual aids can be used: • Individually or in combination with each other. • When giving a speech/presentation.• Audio and visual aids should be used: • To enhance a speech/presentation. • When the situation is appropriate. • Occasionally throughout your speech/presentation.
    • 18. Public SpeakingHandouts/Brochures• Handouts/Brochures are one type of visual aid that are commonly used.• Handouts/brochures contain information about the topic you are speaking about.• They are usually in full color so that it catches the reader‟s eye.• They usually do not contain a great deal of writing so that you do not bore your reader, just enough to give important information.• It is usually best to hand out your handout/brochure when you are finished giving your speech so that your audience is not distracted from your speech.
    • 19. Public SpeakingUmmm, like, Speak Clearly!• Speaking clearly makes you sound and look more professional.• This means eliminating phrases like “ummm” and “like”.
    • 20. Public SpeakingPractice makes Perfect!• One way to help you speak clearly is to make note cards of your speech just highlighting the main points.• Also practice your speech in front of someone…even just yourself in front of a mirror!• You also don‟t want to talk to fast or look at your note cards too often.• Try to be relaxed and confident.• Use the note cards when you get lost.
    • 21. Public SpeakingThe Ending• End your speech effectively by either restating your introduction, or offering a summary of what you just told the audience.• Don‟t end with “And that‟s about it.” Ending with a quote or some kind of advice for the audience gives your ending a lot more power.• I repeat, DO NOT end your speech with the words, “And that‟s about it…” Please. Please. Please.

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