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Leed Presentation Green Bldg Alliance 12 2 08

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What is LEED for homes? Why did INHS choose this rating system?

What is LEED for homes? Why did INHS choose this rating system?

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Transcript

  • 1. Project Rating Systems 12/02/08 INHS’s Experience with LEED
  • 2. What We’ll Cover Today
    • Overview of Project Rating Systems
    • Details on LEED for Homes
    • A LEED Example - 301 Madison St
    • Final Advice
  • 3.
    • Overview of
    • Project Rating Systems
  • 4. “ Green” Project Rating
    • What is it?
    • Why do it?
    • What are some ways of doing it
    • How much does it cost?
    • Why did INHS Pick LEED for Homes?
  • 5. What is “Green” Project Rating?
    • Green building is the practice of increasing the efficiency with which buildings use resources — energy, water, and materials — while reducing building impacts on human health and the environment during the building's lifecycle, through better siting, design, construction, operation, maintenance, and removal - Wikipedia
    • It’s a big world - Where to begin
    • How to weigh all the factors
    Green project rating is a system that helps you quantify the effect of your choices - Scott
  • 6. Why Rate Your Project?
    • Makes the choices simpler
    • Contractors may make mistakes
      • Many eyes and verification help catch the errors
      • Having a written standard reduces questions
    • Keeps everyone honest – reduces “green washing”
  • 7. Why Rate Your Project Yourself
    • Homeowners can
      • see what the issues and opportunities are
      • make informed decisions
    • Easier to build “inside the box”
    • Doesn’t require paying someone to do it for you
    • But experienced builders and architects know much more about the pros and cons of the choices you make
  • 8. Some Project Rating Systems
  • 9. Getting it Rated – What Does it Cost?
    • Paying for the Rating
      • LEED is $2-3,000 a building (INHS’s cost)
      • Energy Star = no net cost to INHS
    • Paying for the Upgrades You Want
      • Some techniques and materials are easy to do, effective, and free
      • More sustainable materials frequently cost more
    There are two costs
  • 10. Getting it Rated – What Does it Cost?
    • Voluntary Systems – free
      • Any checklist you can download
    • Certified Systems - $$$
      • Architect or design professional
      • Energy Star
      • NAHB
      • LEED
    Verification takes time and time is money
  • 11. Why Did INHS Choose LEED for HOMES?
    • Wanted to get credit for what we were already doing
    • Wanted to advance development of a sustainable building standard
    • Wanted a system that had verification
    • Wanted to show affordable housing can be built sustainably
    • Only real standard available at the time
    • So INHS joined the pilot phase of LEED for Homes
    • and
    • Found a grant to help fund it
  • 12.
    • Details on
    • LEED for Homes
  • 13. Disclaimer
    • INHS currently uses LEED for HOMES. It suits our needs. We don’t advocate using it or not using it.
    • LEED for Homes is just one way of looking at your project.
  • 14. What is LEED for HOMES
    • USGBC leading the way in sustainable building
    • “ Official” system for commercial and industrial ratings
    • Different types of buildings require different systems
    • USGBC wanted a national, certifiable standard for residential buildings
  • 15. How does LEED for HOMES Work
    • Innovation and Design Process – special credits for unusual things
    • Location and Linkages – how does it relate to the area around it
    • Sustainable Sites – measures project impact on the site
    • Water Efficiency – measures water efficiency
    • Energy and Atmosphere – energy efficiency
    • Materials and Resources – how does it relate to the area around it
    • Indoor Environmental Quality – reducing pollutant exposure it
    • Awareness and Education – are the occupants aware of the features
    Projects are Broken Down into Categories
  • 16. How does LEED for HOMES Work Projects get points for reaching certain objectives The points are tallied on a checklist
  • 17. How does LEED for HOMES Work Total Number of Points is compared to a standard Certified – 45 points Silver – 60 points Gold – 75 points Platinum – 90 points For LEED, the points needed to reach a standard depends on the size of the house!
  • 18. LEED - Pros and Cons
    • Pros
      • Certifiable (costs extra)
      • National
      • Repetitive, 2 nd time is easy
      • Looks at many facets – contractors are usually focused
    • Cons
      • It’s not cheap and INHS is getting a volume deal
      • The first time is harder
      • Too much paper and tracking for many people
      • Doesn’t reward good design
  • 19.
    • A LEED for Homes Example
    • 301 Madison St
  • 20.
    • 301 Madison St
  • 21.
    • 301 Madison St
    • Innovation and Design Process 5 pts. attained 9 possible
      • LEED representatives actually inspect the house to ensure compliance
    • Location and Linkages 10 pts. attained 10 possible
      • Site is on a previously developed site with full utilities
      • Site is not environmentally sensitive or farmland
      • Over ½ acre of green space is within ¼ mile
      • An outstanding number of community resources are within ¼ mile
    • Sustainable Sites 10 pts. attained 22 possible
      • Minimized disturbed area of the site
      • Very little impervious surfaces so water drains into the ground
      • Landscaping is drought tolerant and integrated with the house
      • Amount of lawn is minimized
      • Site is small allowing for dense development
      • Anti pest measures in place – termite shield and screening
  • 22.
    • 301 Madison St
    • Water Efficiency 4 pts. attained 15 possible
      • Very high efficiency faucets and shower
    • Energy and Atmosphere 20 pts. attained 38 possible
      • House is much more efficient than even Energy Star minimum. Reached the 5 Star level.
      • House is inspected and tested to ensure compliance
  • 23.
    • 301 Madison St
    • Materials and Resources 3 pts. attained 16 possible
      • Advanced framing techniques reduce waste
      • No tropical woods used
      • Waste generated was 50% below average for a new house – very hard to do in a small house
      • Environmentally products used – no carpet, linoleum, recycled porch decking, low VOC paint, recycled insulation
      • No refrigerants
    • Indoor Environmental Quality 16 pts. attained 20 possible
      • Follows the EPA Indoor Air Quality Package ( 75 pt checklist) including
        • Passive radon system
        • Special attention to water management
        • Heating systems carefully sized
        • No forced air ducting
        • All exterior materials finished all sides
        • Special air sealing and ventilation
    • Awareness and Education 1 pts. attained 3 possible
      • Home owner manual and walkthrough
  • 24.
    • 301 Madison St
    Larger homes are more wasteful to build and to live in: this 2 BR home is ~1200 sq ft, 30% smaller than the national average, so we needed 5 fewer points to achieve our rating. LEED for Homes Rating Levels Certified 40 points Silver 55 Gold 70 Platinum 85 301 Madison St received a Gold rating with 73 points
  • 25. What Can You Learn from INHS’s Example?
    • Knowing what you want helps
      • Being the client and developer makes it easier
    • Go with people who know how to build sustainably
      • Remember, everyone has their own point of view
    • Some sort of verification is really worth it
    • The low hanging fruit is not very exciting
  • 26. Big Lessons
    • A modest, well designed house can reach the Gold or high Silver level without spending extra money on “exotic” materials or techniques.
    • More efficient, higher quality, and more sustainable buildings do cost more than run-of-the-mill buildings.
  • 27. The Bottom Line for You When You Build
    • Pick a System (or Systems)
    • Check Your Project Against Your System
    • Make a Checklist of Things to Verify during Building
    • Find a Way to Stay Honest
    • Don’t Chase Points
      • Do it Because It Works for You
      • If It Doesn’t Work for You, It Won’t Last or People won’t use it
  • 28. The End

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