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From Manager to Leader - Stop Doing What Have Made You Successful in the Past in Daily FT 28 April 2014

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From Manager to Leader - Stop Doing What Have Made You Successful in the Past in Daily FT 28 April 2014

From Manager to Leader - Stop Doing What Have Made You Successful in the Past in Daily FT 28 April 2014

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  • 1. www.ft.lk MONDAY APRIL 28, 2014 5 HR Colombo District MP Thilanga Sumapthipala has been appointed as the Corresponding University Distinguished Professor by the Keimyung University of Korea. The conferment of the professorship was made on 18 April in Korea when Sumathipala delivered a spe- cial lecture on ‘Leadership for transformation’ based on his past experience in the corpo- rate sector and national insti- tutions such as Sri Lanka Telecom, Mobitel, Sri Lanka Cricket and as an Executive Director at Parliamentarians for Global Action (PGA). T h e a p p o i n t m e n t o f S u m a t h i p a l a a s Corresponding University Distinguished Professor by the Keimyung University of Korea is from 18 April 2014 to 28 February 2019. The award was made by Kemyung University President Sunn Illhi. The appointment is expect- ed to enhance the strong bilateral ties between Korea and Sri Lanka and paved the way in creating a better understanding about the cul- tures between the two coun- tries, boost collaboration in the higher education ven- tures between the Keimyung University and the universi- ties in Sri Lanka. Korean Uni appoints Thilanga as Corresponding University Distinguished Professor The ILO commemorates the World Day for Safety and Health at Work on 28 April to promote the prevention of occupational accidents and diseases globally. It is an awareness-raising cam- paign intended to focus inter- national attention on emerging trends in the field of occupa- tional safety and health and on the magnitude of work-related injuries, diseases and fatalities worldwide which claim an esti- mated 2 million lives per year. This year’s theme is on ‘Safety and health in the use of chemicals at work’. The production and use of chemi- cal in workplaces around the world present one of the most significant challenges in work- place protection programs. Chemicals are essential to life and their benefits are wide- spread and well-recognised and chemicals are also a critical part of many industrial pro- cesses to develop products that are important to global stand- ards of living. What create the dilemma are the risks associ- ated with exposure to these chemicals. Over the years, chemical safety has been one of the areas in which more work has been carried out in the field of occupational safety and health (OSH). However, even if signifi- cant progress has been made in recent years concerning the regulation and management of chemicals; and governments, employers and workers con- tinue their efforts to minimise the negative effects of the use of hazardous substances both at national and international levels, serious incidents con- tinue to happen and there are still negative impacts on both human health and the environ- ment. Workers who are directly exposed to hazardous substanc- es should have the right to work in a safe and healthy environ- ment, to be properly informed, trained and protected. Implementing the Globally Harmonised System (GHS) in a country will address the first step of the sound management of chemicals. The provisions of the GHS support manufactur- ers and importers being respon- sible for hazard identification and classification of the health, physical, and environmental hazards of all substances. It also specifies the development of labels and safety data sheets for hazardous substances and mixtures using the harmo- nised criteria in the GHS, thus helping to ensure that exposed workers have access to infor- mation, as well as downstream employers. The task at hand for govern- ments, employers, and work- ers is to minimise worker exposures and emissions of chemicals into the environ- ment and develop and imple- ment national preventive and control strategies and systems that comprehensively address the health, safety, and environ- mental aspects related to the use of chemicals to help ensure a coordinated and sustainable management, and decent work for all. The ILO Convention on Safety in the use of chemicals at work 1990 (No. 170) provides a blueprint for the sound man- agement of chemicals in the workplace. The convention pro- visions further elaborated in the accompanying recommen- dation No. 177 as well as in the Code of Practice for Safety in the Use of Chemicals at work and a number of training man- uals. The convention and other tools are just as relevant today as they were when initially adopted. In parallel to the global cam- paign ILO in Sri Lanka will conduct an awareness work- shop on ‘Safety and health in the use of chemicals at work’ to commemorate the World Day for Safety and Health on 28 April in collaboration with the Ministry of Labour and Labour Relations, National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH), Employer Federation of Ceylon and Trade Unions. The MTI-Hilton Business Journalism Forum will be held today (28 April) at the Colombo Hilton from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. This is a pioneering initiative by MTI and Colombo Hilton. This will be the first session of monthly thought leadership forum at which MTI will be dis- cussing, challenging and engag- ing the Sri Lankan business journalist on a diverse range of business management chal- lenges and opportunities that Sri Lanka will be encountering on its economic growth journey. The forum will comprise of a presentation with an inte- grated debate/discussion on thought leadership driven topics per month. As such, today’s topic will be ‘CSR and Environment’. MTI is an internationally networked boutique manage- ment consultancy that enables clients to analyse, strategise and realise profitable business opportunities. MTI advises cli- ents on strategy, restructuring, corporate finance, HRM and marketing, while the services include research, analytics and executive search. By Professor Sattar Bawany Managers often viewed as task- oriented, and not necessarily focused on their employees. Leaders on the other hand are viewed as people- oriented; they impact and influence as well as work through and moti- vate their employees, utilising their resources to perform assigned tasks in the most productive and profitable way pos- sible. Many managers con- fuse management with leadership, and feel they are automatically lead- ers because they occupy a position of higher responsibility. While this assumption is often true, many fail to dis- play active leadership qualities. The roles lead- ers fulfil are different than those of managers, although sound manage- ment practices are com- plementary to effective leadership. While some individuals are natural leaders, most managers must evolve into leaders both by investing time and effort in developing their abili- ties and by adapting their manage- ment roles to a more flexible, effec- tive leadership style. As an Executive Coach, I’ve part- nered with many executives who have made this transition successful- ly. There is one piece of advice I give that sometimes comes as a surprise: I tell people to stop doing some things that earned them that management position in the first place. From manager to leader What makes a leader? Is it a com- pilation of certain behaviours? Is it style? Is it a certain way of com- municating? What do leaders do that makes people perceive them as lead- ers? In order to answer these questions, let’s first look at what makes a good manager. We’ve all had poor managers, so we know a good one right away. It’s someone who inspires us, who cares about what we do and how we do it. It’s someone for whom every- one wants to work - the person who makes the group work as a successful team. If you’re lucky enough to be on that team, coming to work is fun and challenging. You work hard, but you get results. Given that description, isn’t a manager also a leader? Are these not leadership skills? What would keep a great manager from being seen as a potential candidate for leadership? Leaders do share many of the traits of a great manager. They inspire. They motivate. However, leaders take it all a step further. Leaders are enthusi- astic, optimistic and articulate when talking about plans, hopes and successes. Their genu- ine enthusiasm ener- gises and attracts oth- ers. It brings visions to life. Leaders sincerely believe in what they are saying and they dem- onstrate their personal convictions through their behaviours. This is what gives them the confidence to make unpopular judg- ment calls and to sell ideas that contradict the status quo. It’s what enables them to inspire oth- ers to follow them down a difficult road while keeping up the group’s morale. Are there recipe for success for those moving from managerial to leadership roles? Leaders must identify the right goals, develop a supporting strategy, align the architecture of the organi- sation, and figure out what projects to pursue to secure early wins. Leaders at all levels of the organi- sation must demonstrate a high degree of emotional and social intelligence in their leadership role. Emotionally intelligent lead- ers create an environment of posi- tive morale and higher productivity and this would result in sustainable employee engagement. The critical transitional skills for leaders in transition include having emotional intelligence competencies in effective relationship management, cross-cul- tural communication, effective nego- tiation and conflict management. The reality for leaders in transi- tion is that relationships are great sources of leverage. By building cred- ibility with influential players, you are better able to gain agreement on goals, and commitment to achieving those goals. In the leader’s new situation, rela- tionship management skills are criti- cal as they aren’t the only one going through a transition. To varying degrees, many different people, both inside and outside the leader’s direct line of command, are affected by the way he or she handles his or her new role. Transition coaching approach Transition coaching has three overall goals; to accelerate the tran- sition process by providing just-in- time advice and counsel, to prevent mistakes that may harm the busi- ness and the leader’s career, and to assist the leader in developing and implementing a targeted, actionable transition plan that delivers business results. While many of the issues covered by transition coaching are similar to those included in executive coach- ing, such as sorting through short and long-term goals, and managing relationships upwards as well as with team members, transition coaching is focused specifically on the tran- sition and designed to educate and challenge new leaders. The new leader and coach will work together to develop a transition plan, a road map that will define criti- cal actions that must take place dur- ing the first 90 days to establish cred- ibility, secure early wins and position the leader and team for long-term success. The transition coaching relation- ship also includes regular meetings with the new leader as well as ongo- ing feedback. Frequently, the coach conducts a “pulse check” of the key players, including the boss, direct reports, peers and other stakehold- ers, after four to six weeks to gather early impressions so that the new leader can make a course correction if needed. Conclusion Whether a manager is moving into a new leadership position or looking to get back on the road to success, transition coaching work to bring out the best in leaders through the sup- port of a professional relationship with an Executive Coach. The rela- tionship is built on a foundation of trust and confidentiality. The ability of coaches to provide leaders with an outside resource that can also act as a sounding board helps them become the successful leaders they were meant to be. Organisations must clearly define the purpose of coaching, gauge the process, and evaluate results. Coaching is not just about providing support. Ultimately, coaching should deliver what any business needs – real results. (The writer is the CEO of Centre for Executive Education (CEE Global). CEE Global offers executive development solu- tions including executive coaching and leadership development programs that help professionals develop the skills and knowledge to embrace change and catalyse success in their industries. Further details can be found on www.cee-global.com or via email on enquiry@cee-global.com.) Professional organi- sations and associations in accountancy are criti- cal for ensuring the qual- ity of financial reporting, safeguarding the integrity of financial reporting, flow of ideas within the profes- sion, and the development of their members to maintain a strong accountancy profes- sion that advocates for the needs of investors and the gen- eral public said Commercial Bank of Ceylon Chairman Dinesh Weerakkody speaking at the AAT Business School Graduation Ceremony in Colombo. Weerakkody said account- ancy bodies, more than ever, need to ensure their members remain employable during their working life. Therefore employability skills should be included in the curricu- lum in consultation with the stakeholders in order for their members to cope with the change and to remain rel- evant during their working life. Therefore the curriculum of all bodies will need regular modification. Professional bodies should also teach self development skills to their members - teach- ing technical skills is not suf- ficient, educational institu- tions should be concerned with their students’ aptitude to learn, by helping them to develop self-improvement skills. By doing this accountancy graduates would be able to continuously develop their skills and aptitudes that would help them to cope with the changes that would occur in the future. Accountancy bodies accord- ing to Weerakkody also need to develop and enrich the work experience as part of a program of study, attaching the work experience to the conventional program, mak- ing generic modules available to students and developing an additional program that is mostly based on the workplace needs would help students and members to deliver on the job, real time. Further he said the work experience could be additional to the conventional program, like sandwich programs and putting the student through an internship for a short period. However by creating incentives for work-based experience through a year- long placement connected to the program, offering extra- credits for part-time work and voluntary work could be made mandatory to enrich the learn- ing experience he said. Weerakkody in conclusion said achieving success on all these fronts will drive con- tinued recognition by society of the value of professional accountants in business and finally the success of the accountancy profession as a whole. ‘Safety and health in the use of chem- icals at work’: World Day for Safety and Health at Work 2014 is today Work-related injuries, diseases and fatalities worldwide claim 2 million lives per year In parallel to the global campaign ILO in Sri Lanka will conduct an awareness workshop on ‘Safety and health in the use of chemicals at work’ to commemorate the World Day for Safety and Health on 28 April in collaboration with the Ministry of Labour and Labour Relations, National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH), Employer Federation of Ceylon and Trade Unions. FT Alert MTI-Hilton Business Journalism Forum to be held today From manager to leader: Stop doing what’s made you successful Guest Column By Prof. Sattar Bawany We’ve all had poor managers, so we know a good one right away. It’s someone who inspires us, who cares about what we do and how we do it. It’s someone for whom everyone wants to work - the person who makes the group work as a successful team Emotionally intelligent leaders create an environment of positive morale and higher productivity and this would result in sustainable employee engagement. The critical transitional skills for leaders in transition include having emotional intelligence competencies in effective relationship management, cross-cultural communication, effective negotiation and conflict management Challenges facing professional accountancy bodies Colombo District MP Thilanga Sumapthipala MP Thilanga Sumapthipala receiving his appointment from Kemyung University President Sunn Illhi Commercial Bank Chairman Dinesh Weerakkody at the event Ulrich’s ultimatum See Page 14