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CEE Workshop on Developing Multigenerational Team Effectiveness@CAG - 30 May 2014

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  • 1. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 1 Prof Sattar BawanyProf Sattar Bawany CEO, Centre for Executive Education (CEE) C-Suite Master Executive Coach, Executive Development Associates (EDA) Friday, 30 May 2014, CAG Training Room Learn @ Tea Session “Developing Multigenerational Team Effectiveness @ CAG”
  • 2. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 2 Every morning in Asia, a tiger wakes up. It knows it must outrun the slowest deer or it will starve to death. Every morning in Asia, a deer wakes up. It knows it must run faster than the fastest tiger or it will be killed. It doesn’t matter whether you are a tiger or a deer: when the sun comes up, you’d better be running….. Are You a Tiger or a Deer?
  • 3. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 3 How Well Do You Know Yourself?
  • 4. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 4 Module 1: Introduction and Workshop Objectives
  • 5. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 5 About Centre for Executive Education (CEE)  Executive Education  Leadership & High Potential Development  Executive Coaching  Succession Planning  Executive Assessment 5 CEE is the Strategic Partner of Executive Development Associates (EDA), a global leader in executive development & coaching since 1982.
  • 6. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com • CEO of Centre for Executive Education (CEE) • C-Suite Master Executive Coach, EDA Inc. • Strategic Advisor, IPMA Asia Pacific • Adjunct Professor of Paris Graduate School of Management • Over 25 years’ in OD & HR consulting, executive coaching, facilitation, leadership development and training. • Adjunct Professor teaching international business and human resource courses with Paris Graduate School of Management • Assumed senior global and regional leadership roles with DBM (Drake Beam & Morin), Mercer Human Resource Consulting, Hay Management Consultants and Forum Corporation. About Your Key Note Speaker
  • 7. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 7 • Understand the Differences Between Traditionalist, Baby Boomers, Gen X, Gen Y and Gen Z/The Digital Natives • Understand the Best Practices in Developing a Multigenerational Team Effectiveness • Assess their own Emotional Intelligence in Collaborating on a Multigenerational Workplace @ CAG • Learn how to Better Resolve Conflicts with Different Generations at the Workplace using the proven A.G.R.E.E. Framework • Develop a SMART Action Plan to develop better Communication and Relationship with both colleagues and CAG Partners This Session will provide you with a foundation of knowledge that will enable you to: Session Objectives
  • 8. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 8 VIDEO ON GENERATIONAL DIFFERENCES 8 Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i4JxRqWkNlQ
  • 9. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 9 Organisational Results Employee/Team Engagement Organisational Climate Team Effectiveness & Self-Leadership Stakeholder/Partner Engagement • CAG as the world’s leading airport company • Growing a vibrant air hub in Singapore • Partner Satisfaction • Service Value/ Relationship • Employee Satisfaction/Loyalty • Employee Turnover Rate • Mutual Respect & Trust • Collaborative/Win-Win Approach • Effective Communication • Demonstrate “SCORE” • Team Alignment to Purpose • Focus on Collective Outcomes Best Practice I: Results-Based Framework
  • 10. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 10 Teamwork Cohesive Strategy S C Clear Roles and Responsibilities Effective Leadership E R Rapid Response O Open Communication Best Practice II: Team S.C.O.R.E. Framework
  • 11. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 11 Module 2 The New Realities of Multigenerational Workforce
  • 12. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 12 Danger or Opportunity? Our multigenerational work environment can be a source of positive challenge, opportunity and significant growth if managed effectively and leveraged to meet the business goals of our organization.
  • 13. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 13 Shifting Demographics • By 2017, workers in the US, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, Singapore, Italy and the U.K. aged 50 and over will make up more than 40% of the workforce (AARP Profit from Experience, 2007) and will be poised to retire in large numbers within the next ten years. • Gen X represents a much smaller pool of available workers and will not be able to fill the positions left vacant by retirements (Institute for the Future, 2003).
  • 14. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 14  Baby Boomers are retiring at the rate of one every eight seconds  The vast majority of organizational leaders are Baby Boomers with the most typical age being 58 years old  There are 11% fewer Gen Xers than Baby Boomers  Generation Y (twenty-five and under) will not be senior management/ leadership material for years to come Research: The New Realities Source: http://www.executivedevelopment.com/product/decades-of-differences/
  • 15. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 15 Gen Z/ i-Generation / Linksters Generation Y / Millenials Generation XBaby BoomersTraditionalists 68 and over 50-67 33-49 19-32 18 and under 1922-1945 1946-1964 1965-1980 1981-1994 1995-2010 Value logic and discipline, stability, want a legacy Idealistic, competitive, questions authority, dislikes change, recognition, stellar career Work/life balance, career portability, flexible, some anxiety, dislike micro management Value diversity, technologically superior, change, want meaningful work, embrace selected technologies and don’t let go Technology a part of life, never lost, multi-profiled, multi collaborators, multi personality multi locations The 5 Generational Traits
  • 16. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 16 Generational Work Perspectives Generation Years Born Work Perspectives Traditionalists 1922 - 1945 “Company loyalty” - Believed they'd work for the same company their entire career. Boomers 1946 - 1964 “Live to work” - Believe in putting in face time at the office. Women enter the workforce in large numbers. Gen Xers 1965 - 1980 “Work to live” - Believe that work should not define their lives. Dual-earner couples become the norm. Gen Yers (Millennials) 1981 - 1994 “Work my way” - Devoted to their own careers, not to their companies. Desire meaningful work. Gen Zers (Linksters) 1995 to present “Living and Working their way” - Their struggles in the work environment are tied to their youth and inexperience. Desire for change, stimulation, learning and promotion that will conflict with traditional organisational hierarchies. Sattar Bawany, ‘Unlocking unlocking the benefits of a multi-generational workforce in Singapore’, http://sbr.com.sg/hr-education/commentary/unlocking-benefits-multi-generational-workforce-in-singapore, published in Singapore Business Review on 24 January 2013
  • 17. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 17 What is the inter-generational mix in Singapore? • Key findings from survey commissioned by TAFEP :  Together, Gen X and Gen Y make up 60% of the workforce  Means that 40% of the workforce is over 50 years of age • Most employees are:  Working in multi-generational teams  In some cases cross cultural teams  In some cases with remote teams in other parts of the world Source: Tripartite Alliance for Fair Employment Practices (TAFEP) www.fairemployment.sg
  • 18. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com Source: The Straits Times, Singapore 8 April 2010
  • 19. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 19 Generational Differences
  • 20. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 20 Bringing a New Type of Language to the Workplace • Your gf is getto lol • Rofl nah she’s cool • Lol coolies ttyl gtg pos Your girlfriend is lower class laugh out loud Rolling on the floor… Laugh out loud, stay cool, talk to you later, got to go, parents over (my) shoulder
  • 21. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 21 Group Discussion: Productivity Of Multi-Generational Workforce • What is the impact a multi-generational workforce has on effectiveness and productivity at CAG? • What are the operational challenges and how would you resolve them? What are your recommendations? Duration: 10 minutes
  • 22. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 22 Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDAdaaupMno
  • 23. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 23 Module 3 Resolving Multigenerational Conflict with Emotional Intelligence
  • 24. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 24 Emotional Intelligence (EI) & EQ Emotional Intelligence, also called EI and often measured as an Emotional Intelligence Quotient (EQ), describes an ability, capacity, or skill to perceive, assess, and manage the emotions of one's self, of others, and of groups. “Anyone can become angry – that is easy. But to be angry with the right person, to the right degree, at the right time, for the right purpose, and in the right way – that is not easy.” Aristotle in ‘Nicomachean Ethics’ Goleman, D. (1995) Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ. New York: Bantam Books.
  • 25. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 25 Emotional Intelligence by Goleman “The capacity for recognizing our own feelings and those of others, for motivating ourselves, for managing emotions well in ourselves and in our relationships.” Goleman, D. (1995) Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ. New York: Bantam Books. Goleman, D. (1998) Working with Emotional Intelligence. New York: Bantam Books.
  • 26. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 26 5 dimensions to help you navigate life, living, and the increasingly diverse workplace we operate in 5 Dimensions of EI by Goleman Goleman, D. (1998) What Makes a Leader?, Harvard Business Review, HBS Publishing Self-Awareness Self-Regulation Motivation Empathy Social Skills
  • 27. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 27 Self-Awareness • The ability to recognise and understand your moods, emotions and drives, as well as their effect on others • Hallmarks –Self-confidence –Realistic self-assessment –Self-deprecating sense of humour Self-Regulation
  • 28. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 28 Self-Regulation (Self-Management) • The ability to control or redirect disruptive impulses and moods • The propensity to suspend judgment – to think before acting • Hallmarks –Trustworthiness and integrity –Comfort with ambiguity / seniority / change –Openness to change Self-Awareness
  • 29. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 29 Motivation • A passion to work for reasons that go beyond money or status • A propensity to pursue goals with energy and persistence • Hallmarks –Strong drive to achieve –Optimism, even in the face of failure –Organisational commitment Motivation
  • 30. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 30 Empathy • The ability to understand the emotional make- up of other people • Skill in treating people according to their emotional reactions • Hallmarks –Expertise in building and nurturing meaningful relationships at all levels –Cross-cultural sensitivity –Service to clients and customers Empathy
  • 31. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 31 Social Skill (Relationship Management) • Proficiency in managing relationships and building networks • An ability to find common ground and build rapport • Hallmarks –Effectiveness in leading change –Persuasiveness –Expertise in building and leading teams Social Skills
  • 32. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 32 Review Results of Emotional Intelligence Self-Assessment • The purpose of this self-evaluation is to measure your tendencies and abilities within various areas of emotional intelligence • In the space provided next to each of the statements, please write in the number that best describes your agreement with the item, using the scale immediately below. 1 = Disagree Very Much 4 = Agree Slightly 2 = Disagree Moderately 5 = Agree Moderately 3 = Disagree Slightly 6 = Agree Very Much
  • 33. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 33 EI BENCHMARK SCORES EMOTIONAL COMPETENCY BENCHMARK SCORES SELF AWARENESS. 30 SELF REGULATION 29 MOTIVATION 32 EMPATHY 32 SOCIAL SKILLS 34 TOTAL EQ SCORE 157
  • 34. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 34 EI Mini Quiz Important Note: The purpose of the following short quiz is to provide you with an application of Emotional Intelligence (EI). The results you get from this quiz are NOT a comprehensive picture of your EQ.
  • 35. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 35 Scenario 1. You are a Gen Y employee in a meeting when a Baby-Boomer colleague takes credit for work that you have done. What do you do? A. Immediately and publicly confront the colleague over the ownership of your work. B. After the meeting, take the colleague aside and tell her that you would appreciate in the future that she credits you when speaking about your work. C. Nothing, it's not a good idea to embarrass colleagues in public. D. After the colleague speaks, publicly thank her for referencing your work and give the group more specific detail about what you were trying to accomplish.
  • 36. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 36 Answer for Scenario 1 The Credit Stealing Colleague: The most emotionally intelligent answer is D. By demonstrating an awareness of work-place dynamics, and an ability to control your emotional responses, publicly recognizing your own accomplishments in a non-threatening manner, will disarm your colleague as well as puts you in a better light with your manager and peers. Public confrontations can be ineffective, are likely to cause your colleague to become defensive. A. 0 Points – Immediately and publicly confront the colleague over the ownership of your work. B. 5 Points – After the meeting, take the colleague aside and tell her that you would appreciate in the future that she credits you when speaking about your work. C. 0 Points – Nothing, it's not a good idea to embarrass colleagues in public. D. 10 Points – After the colleague speaks, publicly thank her for referencing your work and give the group more specific detail about what you were trying to accomplish.
  • 37. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 37 A. Ignore it – the best way to deal with these things is not to react. B. Call the person into your office and explain that their behavior is inappropriate and is grounds for disciplinary action if repeated. C. Speak up on the spot, saying that such jokes are inappropriate and will not be tolerated in your organization. D. Suggest to the person telling the joke he go through a diversity training program. Scenario 2: You are a Gen X Manager in an organization that is trying to encourage respect for racial and ethnic diversity. You overhear a Gen Y employee telling both sexist and racist jokes. What do you do?
  • 38. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 38 The most emotionally intelligent answer is C. The most effective way to create an atmosphere that welcomes diversity is to make clear in public that the social norms of your organization do not tolerate such expressions. Confronting the behavior privately lets the individual know the behavior is unacceptable, but does not communicate it to the team. Instead of trying to change prejudices (a much harder task), keep people from acting on them. A. 0 Points – Ignore it - the best way to deal with these things is not to react. B. 5 Points – Call the person into your office and explain that their behavior is inappropriate and is grounds for disciplinary action if repeated. C. 10 Points – Speak up on the spot, saying that such jokes are inappropriate and will not be tolerated in your organization. D. 5 Points – Suggest to the person telling the joke he go through a diversity training program. Answer for Scenario 2 The Racist Joke:
  • 39. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 39 Scenario 3. You are a Gen Y Manager and have recently been assigned a Baby Boomer in your team, and have noticed that he appears to be unable to make the simplest of decisions without seeking advice from you. What do you do? A. Accept that he "does not have what it take to succeed around here" and find others in your team to take on his tasks. B. Get an HR manager to talk to him about where he sees his future in the organization. C. Purposely give him lots of complex decisions to make so that he will become more confident in the role. D. Engineer an ongoing series of challenging but manageable experiences for him, and make yourself available to act as his mentor.
  • 40. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 40 The most emotionally intelligent answer is D. Managing multigenerational employees requires high levels of emotional intelligence, particularly if you are going to be successful in maximizing the performance of your team. Often, this means that you need to tailor your approach to meets the specific generational needs of the individual, and provide them with support to help them grow in confidence. A. 0 Points – Accept that he 'does not have what it take to succeed around here' and find others in your team to take on his tasks B. 5 Points – Get an HR manager to talk to him about where he sees his future in the organization C. 0 Points – Purposely give him lots of complex decisions to make so that he will become more confident in the role D. 10 Points – Engineer an ongoing series of challenging but manageable experiences for him, and make yourself his mentor (reverse mentoring) Answer for Scenario 3 The indecisive Baby Boomer Employee:
  • 41. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 41  Acknowledge: Acknowledge conflict; all necessary participants agree to come to the table.  Ground Rules: Set ground rules for the conflict resolution.  Reframe: Reframe the conflict from individual positions to a neutral, mutually acceptable statement of the issues.  Explore: Diverge - Explore a variety of options for resolving the conflict.  Evaluate: Converge - Evaluate options and decide on a solution. The A.G.R.E.E. Framework For Resolving Conflict at Multigenerational Workplace
  • 42. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 42 Module 4 Crafting a SMART Personal Development Plan
  • 43. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 43 Individual Exercise: Creating a SMART Personal Development Plan Specific Goal Measurement When I achieve this goal, I will know I am successful because: Other people will notice the following difference(s): Actions What action will I take? What will I do differently? Reality Check Is this goal achievable? Why is this goal important?” What resource(s) do I need? Funding? Support? Timeline When will I start? When do I expect to meet my goal?
  • 44. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 44 • Build Team Spirit by talking about the generational issues to depersonalize the conflict that arises due to the differences. • Recognize and celebrate the Differences. • Effective Communication - Seek to understand and only then to be understood. • Engage through Managerial Coaching • Encourage Constant Feedback and show recognition for Y-er’s & Z-er’s contribution • Opportunities for Career Advancement and Good Relationships are key factors • Learn to use Technology – it is here to stay! In Conclusion: Key to Success
  • 45. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 45 Appendix Recommended Further Readings and Videos in the Participants’ Resource Workbook
  • 46. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 46 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03o1JZ7c7gI Leading a Gen Y and Gen Z Employees
  • 47. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 47 If you do tomorrow what you did yesterday Your Future is History…………… If you do tomorrow what we’ve covered today Your Future is Historic!!! Final Thoughts…
  • 48. Copyright © 2014 Centre for Executive Education. All rights reserved. www.cee-global.com 48 Prof Sattar Bawany CEO, Centre for Executive Education (CEE Global) Strategic Advisor & Master Facilitator, IPMA Asia Pacific C-Suite Master Executive Coach, Executive Development Associates (EDA) Email: sattar.bawany@ceeglobal.com Slideshare: www.slideshare.net/ceeglobal LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/ceeglobal Facebook: www.facebook.com/ceeglobal Twitter: www.twitter.com/cee_global Articles: http://www.cee-global.com/6/publication Further Dialogue on Social Media
  • 49. © Copyright 2014, Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.cee-global.com Learn @ Tea Session “Developing Multigenerational Team Effectiveness @ CAG” PARTICIPANT’S PRE-WORKSHOP PREPARATION (ASSESSMENT & READINGS) Name : Venue : Changi Airport Group Training Room, Singapore Date : Friday, 30th May 2014 Time : 9.30 am to 12.30 pm Facilitator : Prof Sattar Bawany CEO, Centre for Executive Education (CEE) C-Suite Executive Coach, EDA Asia Pacific Strategic Advisor, IPMA Asia Pacific
  • 50. © Copyright 2014, Centre for Executive Education Pte. Ltd. Page 2 www.cee-global.com 4 May 2014 Dear Participants As your Facilitator, it is a great pleasure to welcome you to the Learn @ Tea Session on “Developing Multi-Generational Team Effectiveness @ CAG which is to be held on 30 May 2014 at CAG premises. For organisations who have four generations of employees sitting in a meeting or working on a project, it can seem like each generation has its own worldviews, priorities, career models, motives and values. The team members need to enhance their understanding of generational characteristics and the impact of their own management practices on each of these groups. They need to leverage on the strengths of each generation. Taking full advantage of the multi-generational workforce will enable employers to effectively attract and retain employees, build teams, deal with change, and increase employee engagement (Bawany, 2013)1 . With a focus on enhancing the effectiveness of multigenerational teams to achieve organisational results, you’ll learn the best practices strategies and proven approaches you need being part of your respective team at the workplace to deliver business outcomes. Gallup Organization research reveals that the longer an employee stays with a company, the less engaged he or she becomes. And that drop costs businesses big in lost profit and sales, and in lower customer satisfaction. In fact, Gallup estimates that actively disengaged employees -- the least productive -- cost the American economy up to US$350 billion per year in lost productivity. This intensely practical ½-day workshop is designed to accelerate the development of emotionally intelligent multigenerational team. The workshop examines the science of emotional intelligence (EQ) and the compelling business case for its relationship to team success. It is designed to equip participants with the relevant emotional skills that distinguish outstanding teams from the average. As part of the preparation for the workshop, kindly complete the attached EQ Assessment & Quiz as well as review the accompanying set of Readings related to the theme of the workshop specifically on Harnessing the Multigenerational Workforce in Singapore. Please bring along the duly completed Assessment and Quiz to the workshop. Finally, it is our hope that the workshop will be a rewarding and useful experience for you, and application to your workplace. Thank you and we look forward to meeting you personally on Friday, 30 May 2014. Your Master Facilitator Prof Sattar Bawany CEO, Centre for Executive Education Strategic Advisor, IPMA Asia Pacific Website: www.cee-global.com 1 “Unlocking the benefits of a multi-generational workforce in Singapore” published by Singapore Business Review, 24 January 2013, http://sbr.com.sg/hr-education/commentary/unlocking-benefits-multi-generational-workforce-in-singapore
  • 51. © Copyright 2014, Centre for Executive Education Pte. Ltd. Page 7 www.cee-global.com EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE MINI QUIZ Important Note: The purpose of the following short quiz is to provide you with an introduction to Emotional Intelligence (EI). The results you get from this quiz are NOT a comprehensive picture of your EI. Scenario 1. You are a Gen Y employee in a meeting when a Baby-Boomer colleague takes credit for work that you have done. What do you do? A. Immediately and publicly confront the colleague over the ownership of your work. B. After the meeting, take the colleague aside and tell her that you would appreciate in the future that she credits you when speaking about your work. C. Nothing, it's not a good idea to embarrass colleagues in public. D. After the colleague speaks, publicly thank her for referencing your work and give the group more specific detail about what you were trying to accomplish. Scenario 2: You are a Gen X Manager in an organization that is trying to encourage respect for racial and ethnic diversity. You overheard a Gen Y employee telling both sexist and racist jokes. What do you do? A. Ignore it – the best way to deal with these things is not to react. B. Call the person into your office and explain that their behavior is inappropriate and is grounds for disciplinary action if repeated. C. Speak up on the spot, saying that such jokes are inappropriate and will not be tolerated in your organization. D. Suggest to the person telling the joke he go through a diversity training program. Scenario 3. You are a Gen Y Manager and have recently been assigned a Baby Boomer in your team, and have noticed that he appears to be unable to make the simplest of decisions without seeking advice from you. What do you do? A. Accept that he "does not have what it take to succeed around here" and find others in your team to take on his tasks. B. Get an HR manager to talk to him about where he sees his future in the organization. C. Purposely give him lots of complex decisions to make so that he will become more confident in the role. D. Engineer an ongoing series of challenging but manageable experiences for him, and make yourself available to act as his mentor. Adapted from Hendrie Weisinger, Emotional Intelligence at Work (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1998), pp. 214-215.
  • 52. © Copyright 2014, Centre for Executive Education Pte. Ltd. Page 8 www.cee-global.com APPENDIX I: RECOMMENDED READINGS & VIDEOS 1. AON-Hewitt (2012), 2012 Trends in Global Employee Engagement: http://www.aon.com 2. Bawany, S. (2010), ‘Leadership That Gets Results’, Human Capital, Vol. 10, Issue 4. 3. Grail Research (2011), Consumers of Tomorrow Insights and Observations About Generation Z 4. Goleman, D. (1988) ‘What Makes a Leader’. Harvard Business Review. November–December. 5. Goleman, D. (2000) ‘Leadership That Gets Results’ Harvard Business Review. March–April. 6. Goleman, D., Boyatzis, R., McKee, A. (2002) ‘Primal Leadership: Realizing the Power of Emotional Intelligence’ Boston: Harvard Business School Publishing. 7. Whitmore, J. (2009) 4th ed., Coaching for Performance, Growing People, Performance and Purpose, Nicholas Brearly. 8. Stein, S. J. & Book, H. E. (2003). The EQ Edge: Emotional Intelligence and your Success. Toronto, ON: Multi-Health Systems Inc. (Bar On Emotional Intelligence Model) Visit the website E.I. Consortium for more information on research and best practices on Emotional Intelligence in organizations, at www.eiconsortium.org 1. Emotional & Social Intelligence: Interview with Daniel Goleman by Harvard Business School: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Qv0o1oh9f4 2. Primal Leadership - The Leader's Mood Drives a Staggering 30% of Performance: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZ6_-WhjT8I 3. TED Talk by Simon Sinek on Inspiring Leadership: http://www.ted.com/talks/simon_sinek_how_great_leaders_inspire_action.html 4. Managing Gen Y: Interview with Tammy Erickson http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDAdaaupMno 5. What Motivates Gen Y and Baby Boomer Talent http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fVHnug8H1MM
  • 53. © Copyright 2014, Centre for Executive Education Pte. Ltd. Page 9 www.cee-global.com APPENDIX II: CORPORATE PROFILE OF CEE AND STRATEGIC PARTNER - EDA About Centre for Executive Education (CEE) The Centre of Executive Education (CEE) is a premier network for established human resource development and consulting firms around the globe which partners with our client to design solutions for leaders at all levels who will navigate the firm through tomorrow's business challenges. CEE has established strategic partnerships with International Professional Managers Association (IPMA) and Executive Development Associates (EDA) as well as a network of Affiliate Partners across the globe. CEE faculty, consultants and executive coaches headed by our founder & CEO, Prof Sattar Bawany, are highly credentialed with extensive experience to help managers and executives who are being positioned for future career growth. They are authors, leaders, and each possesses an enormous passion for the success and growth that executive development and coaching can bring to our participants. CEE suite of executive development programs includes talent management & succession planning, management & leadership development, executive coaching, CEO and board mentoring and advisory services. CEE together with our Strategic and Affiliate Partners helps corporate leaders and small business owners optimize their performance and accomplish their business and professional objectives. To maintain competitive advantage and sustain success in a fast-changing business environment, we believe organizations must identify, nurture, and prepare the next generation of high-performance leaders for excellence. To this end, our programs are designed to equip these leaders to support growth, execute change, and develop people to build high performance organizations – leading to increased productivity, exceptional business results, and greater profitability. About Executive Development Associates (EDA) CEE is a Strategic Partner of Executive Development Associates (EDA) which is established in 1982. EDA is a leader in creating custom-designed executive development strategies, systems and programs that help organizations build the capabilities needed to achieve their strategic objectives. Executive Coaching is one of EDA’s Best-Practice Solutions that delivers a one-on-one growth and development opportunity and produces real business results in a short period of time. EDA customizes coaching to meet the individual’s specific needs and matches the leader with the most appropriate coach. EDA also strategically links the coaching goals to the organization's business strategies. Executive Coaching facilitates individual learning and development for leaders in order to increase the velocity at which business results are achieved. In all of our executive coaching engagements, a collaborative partnership is created between the executive (coachee), the organization, and the executive coach. Executive Coaching Services  Coaches for C-Suite Executives: CEOs and direct reports  Coaches for Executives and Leaders all the way down the leadership pipeline.  Embedded coaches in internal action learning, high-potential or executive development programs to gain real-time exposure of executives.  Coach-the-Coach Internal certifications for internal or external coaches for a specific organization. This ensures that coaching across the organization is aligned with the businesses strategic objectives and the coaches all follow a similar process.  Design and coordination of organization-wide executive coaching programs to ensure an effective use of the company’s resources. Coaching levels are assigned with pre-set investment amounts. Coaches are chosen and trained and processes are set for decision-making, tracking and reporting of development metrics.
  • 54. © Copyright 2014, Centre for Executive Education Pte. Ltd. Page 10 www.cee-global.com APPENDIX III: MASTER FACILITATOR’S PROFILE – PROF SATTAR BAWANY Professor Sattar Bawany is the Chief Executive Officer of the Centre for Executive Education (CEE). Prof Bawany is also concurrently the Strategic Advisor & Member of International Professional Managers Association (IPMA) Board of Trustees and Governing Council. He is also the Managing Director as well as C-Suite Master Executive Coach & Facilitator with Executive Development Associates (EDA) Asia Pacific. IPMA is the Affiliate Partner of EDA in Asia Pacific. Prof Bawany is an Adjunct Faculty of Harvard Business School’s Corporate Learning as well as Duke University’s Corporate Education (Duke CE). He is also a member of Frontier Strategy Group’s Expert Advisory Network (EAN) for Human Capital and Talent Management issues in Asia Pacific advising CEOs and CHROs of global and regional organizations. He has over 25 years’ international business management experience, including 15 years in executive coaching, group facilitation, and leadership development and training with global management consulting firms. In addition to his business and consulting career, Prof Bawany has over 10 years of concurrent academic experience as an Adjunct Professor teaching senior executives international business strategies and human resource courses at various leading universities. He is currently the Adjunct Professor of Strategy with the Paris Graduate School of Management (PGSM). He is a Key Note Speaker at international and regional Conferences, Workshops and Seminars on the following themes: Talent Management; Executive Leadership Development, Employee Engagement and Managing across Generational Gap, Strategic Human Resource Management, and Talent Management & Succession Planning. He is an accomplished Author with a Chapter on “Maximizing the Potential of Future Leader” in the Book “Coaching in Asia the First Decade”. He has published extensively on topics such as Talent Management, Leadership Effectiveness, Strategic HR/OD, Career Management and Executive Coaching in the “The Straits’ Times”, “Singapore Business Review”, “Today’s Manager” and “Human Capital” magazine. He has also appeared regularly on MediaCorp’s Radio’s 93.8FM Live as a studio guest. He holds an Executive MBA and a Bachelor in Business Administration (Marketing). His Doctoral Research is on ‘The Impact of Executive Coaching on the Personal & Professional Development of Leaders”. Prof Bawany is a Fellow of International Professional Managers Association (IPMA) and The Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM). He is a Professional Member of the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD). He is also a Practicing Member of the International Coaching Federation (ICF) and International Association of Coaching (IAC). He is very well regarded by his clients for his practical "how to" approach and for his ability to communicate with his audiences and to make workplace learning a fun and pleasurable experience. Married with 2 children, he believes strongly in work-life balance and is highly dedicated and committed to achieving his goals. Contact Details: Website: www.cee-global.com Email: sattar.bawany@cee-global.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/ceeglobal
  • 55. © Copyright 2014, Centre for Executive Education Pte. Ltd. Page 12 www.cee-global.com COMPILATION OF SELECTED ARTICLES OF INTEREST (ON THEMES RELATED TO MULTIGENERATIONAL WORKFORCE & EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE)
  • 56. Issue 2 2013 • $8 Today’s Multi-Generational Workforce Can They Work Together? The Owen Perspective View from the Top Fast Expanding Markets Looking at Global Markets Maximising Human Capital
  • 57. 16 Harnessing the Potential of Today’s Multi- Generational Workforce in Singapore 6 Year of the Global Small- and Medium- Enterprise 32 Fast-Expanding Markets: A New Way to Look at the Global Markets 50Understanding the Ageing Consumer From the Editors’ iii Desk Customer Service 4 Self-Servicing Customer Service Human Resource Has Singapore’s 2013 8 Budget Addressed Rising Costs and Manpower Crunches? How Middle Managers 12 Can Become Leaders of the Future Features Farming in Singapore: 22 A Diamond in the Rough Business Making Sense of the 26 New MAS Car Loan Restrictions Unethical Cost Saving 28 Measures in the F&B Industry Innovative Fan 30 Company Excites Customers Management Aspirations Ingredients That 37 Make a Good Leader The Owen Perspective View From the Top 41 Management Viewpoints of a 44 Leader: Mr Daniel Tan Woman Leader 48 in a Man’s Industry Marketing Blurring the 53 Boundaries Between Offline and Online for Businesses Communications Communicate 56 Clearly Across Cultures IT Update What is Business 63 Class Productivity? Treatments for Big 68 Data in Healthcare Future of Human– 70 Computer Interaction Reviews Products 72 Good Reads 74 SPOTLIGHT 60 How Leaders Can Drive Innovation Success COVER STORY Scan to Visit Our New Portal! iISSUE 2 2013
  • 58. by Professor Sattar Bawany COVER STORY 16 ISSUE 2 2013
  • 59. SS In today’s struggling global economy, it is im- portant for organisations to leverage the know- ledge, skills, and abilities of all workers, from all generations. By capitalising on the strengths and values of different generations, business leaders can create a sustainable competitive advantage for their organisations. C hanges in the demographic characteristics of Singapore’s workforce deserve more attention from academics, employers, employees, and policy-makers. Today, many organisations have four generations working side-by-side in the workplace. According to Kupperschmidt3 , a generation of employ- ees consists of individuals born approximately within the same time span of two decades each. He explains that a generation is an: “…identifiable group that shares birth, years, age, location, and significant life events at 17ISSUE 2 2013
  • 60. Table 1: The multi-generational workforce Generation Years Born Work Perspectives Traditionalists 1922–1945 Company loyalty: Believe in working for the same company their entire career. Baby Boomers 1946–1964 Live to work: Believe in putting in face time at the office. Women enter the workforce in large numbers. Generation Xers 1965–1980 Work to live: Believe that work should not define their lives. Dual- earner couples become the norm. Generation Yers 1981–1994 Work my way: Devoted to their own careers, not to their companies. Desire meaningful work. Generation Zers 1995–present Living and working their way: Their struggles in the work environment are tied to their youth and inexperience. Desire for change, stimulation, learning, and promotion that will conflict with traditional organisational hierarchies. agers is: “Do we want our legacy to be of mentoring and empowering the next generations, or of fighting them tooth and nail?” Organisations that embrace gene- rational differences in values, ways of getting things done, and ways of communicating will thrive. Demographic and social trends will have a significant impact on the workforce in the coming years. In today’s struggling global economy, it is important for organisa- critical developmental stages”. Others believe that when individuals from the same generation share similar his- torical, economic, and social experiences, they will also have similar work values, attitudes, and behaviours4 . The business world is progressively becoming more global. Services and products offered by businesses are also becoming more focused and targeted at specific demographic segments. Many organisations today have worldwide customers who demand excellent services and products that meet up their diverse needs, expecta- tions, and priorities. Simultaneously, the composition of the global workforce is also changing significantly. After World War II, the Traditionalist generation, born 1922 to 1945, tended to work at the same employer for an entire career. Beginning with the Baby Boomers, born 1946 to 1964, women and ethnic groups began entering the workforce in increasing numbers. They brought different needs and perspectives to the work- place. As the Generation Xers entered the workforce, they increased job hopping in an effort to increase their income and balance their lifestyle. Although some employers made accommodations in response to the demographic shifts, the basic work model—top down, command and control, one-size-fits-all, eight to five workdays—did not radically change. Now, the emergence of the digital-savvy Generation Yers has the potential to change the face of work to be more collaborative, to use virtual teams, to use social media, and to offer more flexible work hours2 . The Fifth Generation Employers must be prepared for a new breed of em- ployee which is poised to enter the workforce. A whole generation of them, known as Generation Z, are highly connected individuals who have grown up with high- speed Internet, smartphones, and online shopping. Born from the mid-1990s onwards, they will enter the work- force in the next five years. This is a generation that has never known a life without superfast communication and unlimited access to media technologies. The five generations and their birth years are depicted in Table 1. Challenges in Managing a Multi-Generational Workforce A major challenge for today’s Traditionalist and Baby Boomer managers is to figure out how to develop younger workers into tomorrow’s managers under a new business environment. A pivotal question for man- 18 ISSUE 2 2013
  • 61. tions to leverage the knowledge, skills, and abilities of all workers from all generations. By capitalising on the strengths and values of different generations, business leaders can create a sustainable competitive advantage for their organisations. Firms struggle with the challenge of effectively mana- ging a more diverse workforce. These challenges of- ten relate to variation in perspective, values, and belief systems as a result of generational and age differences between managers and employees. The assumption that people of varying ages will understand each other or have the same perspective and goals, is untrue. In order to be successful, managers need to understand and va- lue diversity that results from generational differences, varying perspectives, and differing goals. Each generation brings different experiences, perspec- tives, expectations, work styles, and strengths to the workplace. Despite the perceived generation gap from differing views and potential conflict, organisations have the opportunity to capitalise on the assets of each generation to achieve competitive advantage. Each brings unique assumptions to the job. As a result, events in the workplace are often interpreted differently by individuals in different generations. What may seem like good news to a Baby Boomer might be an unsett- ling and unwelcome development to a member of Gene- ration X. Things that members of Generation Y love of- ten seem unappealing to those in older generations. Like any other generation, Generation Z brings its own mindset into the workforce. They are also called Linksters because no other generation has ever been so linked to each other and to the world through techno- logy. Their struggles in the work environment are tied to their youth and inexperience. They are complete dig- ital natives and cannot function without communicating through social media. Their desire for change, stimula- tion, learning, and promotion often conflicts with tradi- tional organisational hierarchies. Leading and Engaging a Multi-Generational Workforce When employees join an organisation, they are usually enthusiastic, committed, and ready to be advocates for their new employer because they are engaged. But often, that first year on the job is their best. Re- search from Gallup Incorporation reveals that the long- er an employee stays with a company, the less engaged he or she becomes. This causes businesses to lose out on profit and sales, and it lowers customer satisfaction. Gallup estimates that actively disengaged employees cost the American economy up to US$350 billion per year in lost productivity. Managers who harness this unprecedented opportunity for growth, development, and collaboration can build bridges between generations and will thrive in today’s turbulent economic landscape. For managers who have four generations of employees working on a project, it can seem like each generation has its own worldviews, priorities, career models, mo- tives, and values. They need to enhance their under- standing of generational characteristics and the impact of their own management practices on each of these groups. By doing so, they can leverage on the strengths of each generation. Taking full advantage of the multi- generational workforce will enable employers to effec- tively attract and retain employees, build teams, deal with change, and increase employee engagement. Impact of Leadership Effectiveness on Employee Engagement and Organisational Success Organisations need to deliver service value and build good customer relationships in order to generate sus- tainable results through their loyal customers. In Figure 1, we can see that employees at the forefront of the ser- vice delivery chain hold the key to building this loyal customer base1 . Employees who are engaged and motivated are instru- mental in delivering the service experience for clients which results in customer engagement. The level of employee engagement depends on the organisational climate, which refers to how employees feel about work- ing in the organisation. It is the process of quantifying the culture of an organisation. We know that leaders create, transform, and manage or- ganisational cultures. The leader’s values, beliefs, and leadership styles will impact the organisation’s climate. We need “Level 5 Leaders” who demonstrate ontologi- cal humility and possess emotional mastery. They also need to possess essential integrity in discharging their day-to-day role and responsibilities towards engaging the employees. In his book, Good to Great, Mr Jim Collins examines how a good company becomes an exceptional company. The book introduces a new term to the leadership lexi- con—Level 5 leadership. It refers to the highest level in a hierarchy of executive capabilities. Leaders at the other 19ISSUE 2 2013
  • 62. References 1 Bawany, S (2011). Ways to Achieve Organisational Success: Role of Leaders in Engaging the Multi-Generational Workforce published by Singapore Business Review, 1 November 2011. 2 Bawany, S (2013). Unlocking the Benefits of a Multi-Generational workforce in Singapore published by Singapore Business Review, 24 January 2013. 3 Kupperschmidt BR (2000). Multigenerational employees: strategies for effective management. Health Care Manager. 19 (1): 65-76. 4 Smola KW, Sutton CD (2002). Generational differences: Revisiting generational work values for the new millennium. Journal of Organizational Behaviour. 23 (4): 363-82. 5 Tay A (2011). Managing generational diversity at the workplace: expectations and perceptions of different generations of employees. African Journal of Business Management Vol. 5(2), pp. 249-255, 18 January, 2011 6 Zemke R, Raines C, Filipczak B (2000). Generations at work: Managing the clash of Veterans, Boomers, Xers and Nexters in your workplace (2nd Ed). American Management Association, New York, NY. Professor Sattar Bawany is the chief executive officer of The Centre for Executive Education. He is also con- currently the strategic advisor and member of International Profess- ional Managers Association Board of Trustees and Governing Council and is the co-chair of the Human Capital Committee of the American Chamber of Commerce in Singapore. Figure 1: Impact of Leadership on Employment and Cust- omer Engagement1 four levels may be successful, but are unable to elevate companies from mediocrity to sustained excellence. Level 5 leadership challenges the assumption that trans- forming companies from good to great requires larger- than-life-leaders. The leaders that came out on top in Mr Collins’ five-year study were relatively unknown outside their industries. The findings appear to signal a shift of emphasis away from the hero to the anti-hero. According to Mr Collins, humility is a key ingredient of Level 5 leadership. His simple formula is Humility + Will = Level 5. He explains: “Level 5 leaders are a study in duality. They are modest, wilful, shy, and fearless.” Managers who build bridges between generations and harness this unprecedented opportunity for growth, de- velopment, and collaboration will thrive. Although it may seem like a monumental task for management to ensure that employees understand and accept the idio- syncrasies of each multi-generational group, it is not impossible. Management must be the first to acknow- ledge and accept the unique characteristics and expecta- tions of employees from different generational groups. Management should also ensure that individuals from different generations perceive each other more posi- tively to avoid any intergenerational disharmony. The sooner employees from all the existing generational groups learn to respect and accept one another the easi- er it will be for them to welcome Generation Z employ- ees to the new workforce after the year 20205 . 20 ISSUE 2 2013
  • 63. 10 THE GRADUATE Jan-Mar 2013 Special report Maya Angelou, an American author and poet, once said this, “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” Lilian Wu takes a closer look at how this ties in with the new wave of leadership with Emotional Intelligence (EI) or Emotional Quotient (EQ). The Impact of leadership with Emotional Intelligence
  • 64. Jan-Mar 2013 THE GRADUATE 11 Special report I f feeling is what is best remem- bered, then the same can be said of leadership, especially in today’s competitive global environment. Leadership has been commonly defined as a process where a per- son influences a group of people or organisation to accomplish a common goal. To qualify as a good leader, you need to have the necessary exper- tise and technical skills to lead the organisation. However, to be a truly great leader, it takes exceptional skills to communicate and manage people effectively. In other words, you need EI or EQ. What Leaders Need To Succeed In a research done by the Carnegie Institute of Technology, it was found that 85 percent of our financial suc- cess is due to ‘human engineering’ skills (personality and ability to com- municate, negotiate and lead) while only 15 percent is based on technical skills. The case of Johnson & John- son further proves the link between a company’s financial performance and leadership that possesses EQ — the ability to perceive, assess and man- age one’s emotions and those of oth- ers. In a global study1 that was con- ducted on 358 managers across the Johnson & Johnson Consumer & Per- sonal Care Group (JJC&PC Group), results show that the best performing managers were also the ones who were more “emotionally competent”. Randstad’s World of Work Report 2012/2013, which canvassed opinions from 1,315 people (including 625 leaders) in Singapore, also showed a similar trend: analytical and technical skills are rated as far less important than leadership and other skills when maintaining competitiveness in the next five years. When Dr Mike Gosling, Emotional Leader Coach, did a doctoral thesis2 on the emotional intelligence of managers in Singapore in 2006, he pointed out that “managers who want to be emotionally intelligent leaders have a responsibility to exercise emotional leadership in their interactions with others, assisting them in gaining emotional knowledge and nurturing emotionally intelligent behaviour.” Martin Tan, Co-founder and Ex- When Dr Mike Gosling, Emotional Leader Coach, did a doctoral thesison the emotional intelligence of managers in Singapore in 2006, he pointed out that “managers who want to be emotionally intelligent leaders have a responsibility to exercise emotional leadership in their interactions with others, assisting them in gaining emotional knowledge and nurturing emotionally intelligent behaviour.” ecutive Director of Halogen Founda- tion Singapore, clearly illustrates this point when he had to negotiate the differences that had arisen among his staff at a restaurant he co-owned with his wife at Plaza Singapura. “At Tea Cosy, I often have issues between the kitchen staff and the service staff. One wants the food to be served hot, the other wants to ensure that the customer enjoys his or her appetiser without feeling rushed to finish it because the main course is served.” Mr Tan shared. “There was once where anger flared. I sat both parties down individually first to understand their perspectives and subsequently getting both to sit down together to work through the differences. Having EQ allowed me to manage the emotions of both parties.” he added. “It allowed me to have a conversation about the pain points for both of them and find common ground so that they continue to be good friends and colleagues. It’s always satisfying to see issues being resolved amicably where both parties are willing to work through their differences.” Why EI Works “Effective leaders use Emotional Intel- ligence in their leadership to achieve buy-in, trust and commitment,” Dr Granville D’Souza, Regional Direc- tor of 6 Seconds SEA Pte Ltd and author of two books, EQ from Inside Out and an upcoming title The EQ Leader, explained. “If this is done effectively, they can better marshal the inner resources to influence, communicate and convince others. Quite often, we learn tactical skills [and] strategies that are cognitive in nature. These can never be understated. However, when these are executed without sensitivity to the other person’s feelings and devoid of empathy, it can come across as transactional,” he observed. Dr D’Souza then went on to elaborate, “I have witnessed leaders who are very sharp and they are quick to whip out their thoughts, ideas and strategies to solve problems but they do this without considering people’s feelings. This happens very often when sales departments clash with operations. Sales oversells and Research by Carnegie Institute of Technology found that 85 percent of our financial success is due to ‘human engineering’ skills (personality and ability to communicate, negotiate and lead) while only 15 percent is based on technical skills. operations cannot meet such promises to the customers. Sales leaders then rebuke operations for incompetence and indifference.” When this happens, the two teams will cease to see themselves as part of the organisation with a common goal. Resentment will brew and the company often ends up paying the price in terms of poor
  • 65. 12 THE GRADUATE Jan-Mar 2013 Special report sales performance, wasted time and opportunities, as well as loss of customers. The company’s reputation takes a hit and leaders who persist in their old ways may find themselves becoming a liability to the companies they serve. Low EQ & No Action Dr Karol Wasylyshyn, Adjunct Profes- sor of Clinical Psychology at Institute for Graduate Clinical Psychology at Widener University and author of Be- hind the Executive Door: Unexpected Lessons in Managing your Boss and Career, shared a story of how one of her clients refused to accept the 360- degree report that she had compiled based on feedback from his company. “He was very self-focused and very narcissistic. The only thing he really cared about was his relationships with the people at the top and looking good,” described Dr Wasylyshyn. After her client confronted his leadership team about the report in a meeting, he was later told behind closed doors that if he did not make an effort to change his behaviour, his retirement would be accelerated as he was close to retiring then. “And he would not hear of it, his defences were so strong and that was what happened,” she commented. “They accelerated his retirement and they put someone else in the job.” “It starts with the intention. Leaders have to decide that they need to evolve in that way,” Dr Wasylyshyn concluded. Mr Tan shares the same view, “The will to have EQ has to do with whether we care enough about our staff or colleagues. If a leader does not care about people or their well-being, they typically lack the ingredient to have high EQ.” Having low EQ does not mean things cannot get better. As long as there is the intention and motivation to improve, a company can still be taken to new heights even when things seem bleak. Chade-Meng Tan, best-selling author of Search Inside Yourself, shared the story3 of Patagonia, a company that makes outdoor clothing and gear. Casey Sheahan, the CEO, had wanted to lay off people during an economic downturn as he thought that was the only solution available to him. His wife, Tara, then asked him, “Are you making this decision out of fear or out of love?” When Casey realised that he was acting due to fear, he decided not to lay off people and this decision eventually paid off when the company achieved record sales the year after. Imagine what it would have been like had Casey gone through with the layoffs. He would have to spend extra time and money to hire new people and train them properly. “Even when it is ‘obvious’ that you have to fire people, if you see things in an emotionally intelligent way, it turns out that it may not be the only solution. There may be other creative solutions that enable better outcomes,” said Chade-Meng. What EI is Not While being considerate of other people’s feelings is a key trait of being emotionally intelligent, Dr Granville stressed that EI is not about being ‘nice’. “Leaders should demonstrate emotional competence and lead with ‘Love’ which refers to a strong affiliation and coach- ing leadership style with care and humility, instead of using ‘Fear’ which refers to a coercive leadership style,” said Professor Sattar Bawany, Master Executive Coach of Executive Development Associates. “Flexible leadership, however, involves being able to adapt your leadership style according to the situation and the state of the team.” It is clear that EI is the critical currency that sets a leader apart from his peers and propels an organisa- tion to success. Of course, there are exceptions where leaders who lack EQ are tolerated because they bring in the results. But the minute a major crisis hits the company, when people’s emotions are at their most turbulent, it is the wise leader who will seek to improve their EQ to keep up with their company’s changing needs with a softer touch and more creative solutions. “Leaders should demonstrate emotional competence and lead with ‘Love’ which refers to a strong affiliation and coaching leadership style with care and humility, instead of using ‘Fear’ which refers to a coercive leadership style.” Professor Sattar Bawany Master Executive Coach Executive Development Associates 1. Cavallo, K. & Brienza, D. (2001). Emotional competence and leadership excellence at Johnson & Johnson: The emotional intelligence and leadership study. 2. Gosling. M (2006). The Emotional Intelligence of Managers in Singapore 3. http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article.cfm?articleid=2992