CEE Key Note Presentation on "Achieving Career Success with Emotional Intelligence" - 23 August 2013

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  • 1. Key Note Presentation on “Achieving Career Success with Emotional Intelligence” Page 1 ACHIEVING CAREER SUCCESS WITH EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE SYNOPSIS OF KEY NOTE PRESENTATION “Anyone can become angry - that is easy. But to be angry with the right person, to the right degree, at the right time, for the right purpose, and in the right way - this is not easy.” Aristotle For years, people have assumed that successful people were basically very smart and hardworking. Studies have found that while there is some correlation between IQ and success, it by no means explains why some people with high IQs can fail in a job, while others perform exceptionally well despite average intelligence. A growing body of research suggests that emotional intelligence, measured by emotional intelligence quotient (EQ), is a better predictor of "success" than the more traditional measures of cognitive intelligence (IQ). Emotional Intelligence is not about being soft, emotional and "nice". It is about being effective, and knowing how to communicate and work effectively. Emotional Intelligence reflects one's ability to deal with daily challenges. It includes internal skills necessary to manage and control oneself in different situations. As Daniel Goleman states in his book, Working with Emotional Intelligence, “The rules for work are changing.” You are being judged by a new yardstick; not just by how smart you are, or by your training and expertise, but also by how well you handle each other and yourselves. This yardstick is increasingly applied in choosing who will be hired and who will not, who will be let go and who retained, who passed over and who promoted. The days when intelligence was your ticket to success is gone. Current research shows that IQ along with skills and knowledge make up only 20% of what you need for success. EQ is the other 80%! Generation Y or “Gen Y” for short – is the term most commonly used to refer to the cohort of individuals born in the 80s and 90s, who are already in the workforce. The Fifth generation, Gen Z or The Linksters will be coming into the workforce very soon. For Leaders who have four generations of employees sitting in a meeting or working on a project, it can seem like each generation has its own worldviews, priorities, career models, motives and values. The Leader need to enhance their understanding of generational characteristics and the impact of their own management practices on each of these groups. They need to leverage on the strengths of each generation. Taking full advantage of the multi-generational workforce will enable employers to effectively attract and retain employees, build teams, deal with change, and increase employee engagement (Bawany, 2011)1 . Emotional intelligence can be defined as the ability to be aware of own and others emotions and feelings and to manage the emotions in self and others (Goleman, 1995). Emotional intelligence is also defined as a subset of “social intelligence” which involves the ability to consider one’s own and others’ feelings and emotions to guide one’s thinking and actions (Salovey and Mayer, 1989). Emotional intelligence can actually be more influential upon an individual's success in life (personally and professionally) than cognitive intelligence (Stewart, 2008). People with high levels of emotional intelligence abilities are more likely than who have less emotional intelligence to achieve high levels of success in their workplace. Specially, scholars have stated that social skills are necessary for executive level leaders; as individuals ascend the organizational hierarchy; social intelligence becomes an relevant determinant increasingly of who will and will not be successful (Carmeli, 2003). Emotional intelligence is also an important of personal relationships success, family functioning, and success in the workplace (Salovey, Mayer & Causo, 2002). 1 “Ways to achieve Organisational Success: Role of Leaders in Engaging the Multi-Generational Workforce” published by Singapore Business Review, 1st November 2011. http://sbr.com.sg/hreducation/commentary/ways-achieve-incredible-organizational-success-0
  • 2. Key Note Presentation on “Achieving Career Success with Emotional Intelligence” Page 2 APPENDIX - PROFILE OF KEY NOTE SPEAKER – PROF SATTAR BAWANY Professor Sattar Bawany is Chief Executive Officer of the Centre for Executive Education (CEE) and Senior Advisor of Eduquest International Institute. He is concurrently the Strategic Advisor & Member of International Professional Managers Association (IPMA) Board of Trustees and Governing Council. He is also the Managing Director as well as Master Executive Coach with Executive Development Associates (EDA) Asia Pacific. Prof Bawany has over 25 years’ international business management experience, including 15 years in executive coaching, group facilitation, and leadership development and training with global management consulting firms. In addition to his business and consulting career, Prof Bawany has over 10 years of concurrent academic experience as an Adjunct Professor teaching senior executives international business strategies and human resource courses at various leading universities. He is currently the Adjunct Professor of Strategy with the Paris Graduate School of Management (PGSM). Prof Bawany has assumed various senior management roles including that of Managing Director and Talent Management & Executive Coaching Practice Leader for DBM Asia Pacific. He was also the Global Information Services (GIS) Business Unit Leader with Mercer HR Consulting. Prior to joining Mercer, he was the Head of Hay Learning Services and Senior Consultant of Organisational Effectiveness/Leadership Development with The Hay Group. Prof Bawany’s passion for people and culture is about creating an environment where employees are valued and emotionally engaged in the business. He has successfully worked with extensive number of public and private organisations regionally and internationally specialising in people and culture through transformational change, starting with the ‘end’ in mind! He is an experienced facilitator and has spent many years developing leadership capability through the delivery of structured talent management, leadership development programs including executive coaching. Prof Bawany is an astute advisor to executives who need to know how they are perceived and want to focus on what is most important in their professional and personal lives. He has coached a range of leaders, from CEOs, to senior vice presidents, and high potential managers. His current work in organisations focuses on encouraging individual initiative and leadership from a systemic perspective in order to achieve clearly defined business results. His specialty is effectively linking people processes to business outcomes. He is a Key Note Speaker at international and regional Conferences, Workshops and Seminars on the following themes: Talent Management; Executive Leadership Development, Employee Engagement and Managing across Generational Gap, Strategic Human Resource Management, and Talent Management & Succession Planning. He is an accomplished Author with a Chapter on “Maximizing the Potential of Future Leader” in the Book “Coaching in Asia the First Decade”. He holds an Executive MBA and a Bachelor in Business Administration (Marketing). His Doctoral Research is on “The Impact of Executive Coaching on the Personal & Professional Development of Leaders”. Prof Bawany is a Fellow of International Professional Managers Association (IPMA) and The Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM). He is a Professional Member of the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD). He is also a Practicing Member of the International Coaching Federation (ICF) and International Association of Coaching (IAC). He is very well regarded by his clients for his practical "how to" approach and for his ability to communicate with his audiences and to make workplace learning a fun and pleasurable experience. Married with 2 children, he believes strongly in work-life balance and is highly dedicated and committed to achieving his goals.
  • 3. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 1 Prof Sattar BawanyProf Sattar Bawany CEO, Centre for Executive Education (CEE) C-Suite Master Executive Coach, EDA Senior Advisor, IPMA Asia Pacific 23 August 2013 James Cook University, Singapore campus “ACHIEVING CAREER SUCCESS WITH EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE”
  • 4. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 2 Every morning in Asia, a tiger wakes up. It knows it must outrun the slowest deer or it will starve to death. Every morning in Asia, a deer wakes up. It knows it must run faster than the fastest tiger or it will be killed. It doesn’t matter whether you are a tiger or a deer: when the sun comes up, you’d better be running….. Are You a Tiger or a Deer?
  • 5. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 3 About Centre for Executive Education (CEE)  Executive Education  Leadership & High Potential Development  Executive Coaching  Succession Planning  Executive Assessment 3 CEE is the Affiliate Partner of Executive Development Associates (EDA), a global leader in executive development & coaching since 1982.
  • 6. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 4 • Centre for Executive Education (CEE) is the Executive Development Division of the International Professional Managers Association (IPMA). • IPMA is a global ‘not-for-profit’ (NPO) members organisation headquartered in UK with Regional Offices in Europe, Africa and Asia Pacific. • CEE’s mission is to assist client organisation to secure a leading position in their respective market place and develops a sustainable competitive advantage through developing their key asset, intellectual capital of the people. • CEE offers talent management solutions including career management, executive coaching and custom-designed leadership development programs to accelerate individual performance and succession planning for organisations. Who We Are
  • 7. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php • CEO of Centre for Executive Education (CEE) • C-Suite Master Executive Coach, EDA • Senior Advisor, IPMA Asia Pacific • Adjunct Professor of Paris Graduate School of Management • Over 25 years’ in executive coaching, facilitation, leadership development and training. • Adjunct Professor teaching international business and human resource courses with Paris Graduate School of Management • Assumed senior global and regional leadership roles with DBM (Drake Beam & Morin), Mercer Human Resource Consulting, Hay Management Consultants and Forum Corporation. About Your Key Note Speaker
  • 8. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 7 Knowing Yourself as a Leader
  • 9. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 8 • Of all the abilities deemed essential for effective performance, 67% were related to EI. -Rosier 1994 • Of all the competencies that distinguish outstanding managers (vs. mediocre managers), 81% are related to EI. -Boyatzis, 1982 Why do smart people fail?
  • 10. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 9 Common Employer Complaints • Lack of social skills, motivation to keep learning, and inability to take criticism • Leads to plateaued or derailed careers because of crucial gaps in Emotional Intelligence Competencies
  • 11. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 10 Career Derailing or Plateauing Career Derailing: Upward job progression stops, often through job loss of some sort, or shift into a new and less-desirable direction Career Plateauing: Upward progress and general growth slows and then completely stops
  • 12. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 11 1. Failure to Meet Business Objectives (Achieving Organisational Results) 2. Inability to Change or Adapt During a Transition (The inability to respond quickly and flexibly to rapidly changing market conditions) 3. Problems with Interpersonal Relationships (Lack of social/emotional intelligence skills as well as relationship management skills) 4. Failure to Build and Lead a Team (Getting the ‘Right Person on the Bus’, ‘Wrong Person off the Bus’ & ‘Right Person in the Right Seat’) 5. Failing to make the boss/organization's priorities a high priority Top Lessons on Career Derailers for Leaders
  • 13. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 12 Successful Leaders “Leadership is all about the ability to have impact and influence on your followers so as to engage them towards ACHIEVING RESULTS of your organisation through both Ontological Humility and Servant Leadership & Level 5 Leadership Styles blended with elements of Socialised Power/Social Intelligence Competencies ” (Bawany, 2013) Reference: Sattar Bawany, “Making Results-based Leadership Work in Singapore” Singapore Business Review, http://sbr.com.sg/hr-education/commentary/making-results-based-leadership-work-in-singapore, first published on 12 February 2013.
  • 14. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 13 Leaders’ Role in Achieving Results • Profitability • ROI • Cost Optimisation • Employee Satisfaction • Employee Loyalty • Company Policies • Rewards and Flexibility • Culture, Espirit De Corps • EQ/EI Competencies • Leadership Styles • Level 5/Ontological Humility Organisational Results Employee/Stakeholder Engagement Organisational Climate Leadership Effectiveness Customer Engagement/Loyalty • Customer Satisfaction • Service Value/ Relationship Sattar Bawany, “Making Results-based Leadership Work in Singapore” Singapore Business Review, http://sbr.com.sg/hr-education/commentary/making-results-based-leadership-work-in-singapore, 12 February 2013
  • 15. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 14 Developing Your Emotional Intelligence
  • 16. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 15 You CAN change this !
  • 17. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 16
  • 18. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 17 IQ vs. EQ IQ • Intellectual capability (IQ), knowledge, and technical expertise • Is a threshold, not a differentiator for outstanding leadership EQ • Emotional Intelligence (EQ) is the differentiating factor in success • EI is two times as important as IQ and technical expertise combined
  • 19. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 18 The more complex the job, the more EQ (EI Competencies) matters!! Importance of EQ in Job Complexity
  • 20. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 19 Intelligence Quotient (IQ) IQ refers to an individual’s logical abilities (or the cognitive aspects of intelligence) such as memory, problem solving, how to rationalize and analyze as well as scholastic abilities
  • 21. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 20 Emotional Intelligence (EI) & EQ Emotional Intelligence, also called EI and often measured as an Emotional Intelligence Quotient (EQ), describes an ability, capacity, or skill to perceive, assess, and manage the emotions of one's self, of others, and of groups “Anyone can become angry – that is easy. But to be angry with the right person, to the right degree, at the right time, for the right purpose, and in the right way – that is not easy.” Aristotle in ‘Nicomachean Ethics’ Goleman, D. (1995) Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ. New York: Bantam Books.
  • 22. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 21 Emotional Intelligence by Goleman “The capacity for recognizing our own feelings and those of others, for motivating ourselves, for managing emotions well in ourselves and in our relationships.” Goleman, D. (1995) Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ. New York: Bantam Books. Goleman, D. (1998) Working with Emotional Intelligence. New York: Bantam Books.
  • 23. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 23 5 dimensions to help you navigate life, living, and the increasingly diverse workplace we operate in 5 Dimensions of EI by Goleman Goleman, D. (1998) What Makes a Leader?, Harvard Business Review, HBS Publishing Personal Competence – how we manage ourselves 1. Self Awareness – knowing your strengths and weaknesses 2. Self Regulation - trustworthiness, responsibility, adaptability, 3. Motivation - drive, commitment, initiative, optimism, charisma Social Competence - how we handle relationships 4. Empathy - awareness of other’s feelings and concerns 5. Social skills - adeptness a inducing desirable responses, such as communication, conflict management, cooperation, and leadership
  • 24. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 24 Self-Awareness • The ability to recognise and understand your moods, emotions and drives, as well as their effect on others • Hallmarks – Self-confidence – Realistic self-assessment – Self-deprecating sense of humour Self-Regulation
  • 25. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 25 Self-Regulation (Self-Management) • The ability to control or redirect disruptive impulses and moods • The propensity to suspend judgment – to think before acting • Hallmarks – Trustworthiness and integrity – Comfort with ambiguity / seniority / change – Openness to change Self-Awareness
  • 26. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 26 Motivation • A passion to work for reasons that go beyond money or status • A propensity to pursue goals with energy and persistence • Hallmarks – Strong drive to achieve – Optimism, even in the face of failure – Organisational commitment Motivation
  • 27. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 27 Empathy • The ability to understand the emotional make- up of other people • Skill in treating people according to their emotional reactions • Hallmarks – Expertise in building and nurturing meaningful relationships at all levels – Cross-cultural sensitivity – Service to clients and customers Empathy
  • 28. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 28 Social Skill (Relationship Management) • Proficiency in managing relationships and building networks • An ability to find common ground and build rapport • Hallmarks – Effectiveness in leading change – Persuasiveness – Expertise in building and leading teams Social Skills
  • 29. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 29 "A leader's intelligence has to have a strong emotional component. He has to have high self-awareness, maturity and self-control. He must be able to withstand the heat, handle setbacks and when those lucky moments arise, enjoy success with equal parts of joy and humility. Emotional intelligence is more rare than book smarts, but it is actually more important in the making of a leader." Jack Welch, former Chairman & CEO of GE Inc. Speaking to The Wall Street Journal Leadership and EI
  • 30. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 30  Level 5 Leaders:  Many people have the potential to be Level 5  Ambitious for the organization – not for themselves  Set up their successors for even greater success  Display modesty, are self-effacing and understated  Are driven by a need to produce results  Credit success to others but take responsibility for failure  Level 5 leaders score well on BarOn EQ-i Level 5 Leadership Source: Jim Collins, ‘Good to Great’, Harper Collins: 2001
  • 31. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 31 EI and Developing Future Leaders • Successful leaders at all levels demonstrate a high degree of Emotional Intelligence in their role • Emotionally intelligent leaders create an environment of positive morale and higher productivity resulted in sustainable employee engagement • Critical transitional skills include EI competencies such as relationship management; cross cultural communication; effective negotiation and conflict management Bawany, S. (2010). ‘Maximizing the Potential of Future Leaders: Resolving Leadership Succession Crisis with Transition Coaching’ In ‘Coaching in Asia – The First Decade’. Creation Publishing LLP. Download e-copy from: http://www.ipma.com.sg/publications.php
  • 32. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 32 EI Mini Quiz Important Note: The purpose of the following short quiz is to provide you with an application of Emotional Intelligence (EI). The results you get from this quiz are NOT a comprehensive picture of your EQ.
  • 33. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 33 Scenario 1. You are in a meeting when one of your colleague takes credit for work that you have done. What do you do? A. Immediately and publicly confront the colleague over the ownership of your work. B. After the meeting, take the colleague aside and tell her that you would appreciate in the future that she credits you when speaking about your work. C. Nothing, it's not a good idea to embarrass colleagues in public. D. After the colleague speaks, publicly thank her for referencing your work and give the group more specific detail about what you were trying to accomplish.
  • 34. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 34 Masterclass on 'High Performance Leadership' for Menlo Worldwide Logistics Answer for Scenario 1 The Credit Stealing Colleague: The most emotionally intelligent answer is D. By demonstrating an awareness of work-place dynamics, and an ability to control your emotional responses, publicly recognizing your own accomplishments in a non-threatening manner, will disarm your colleague as well as puts you in a better light with your manager and peers. Public confrontations can be ineffective, are likely to cause your colleague to become defensive. A. 0 Points – Immediately and publicly confront the colleague over the ownership of your work. B. 5 Points – After the meeting, take the colleague aside and tell her that you would appreciate in the future that she credits you when speaking about your work. C. 0 Points – Nothing, it's not a good idea to embarrass colleagues in public. D. 10 Points – After the colleague speaks, publicly thank her for referencing your work and give the group more specific detail about what you were trying to accomplish.
  • 35. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 35 Masterclass on 'High Performance Leadership' for Menlo Worldwide Logistics A. Ignore it – the best way to deal with these things is not to react. B. Call the person into your office and explain that their behavior is inappropriate and is grounds for disciplinary action if repeated. C. Speak up on the spot, saying that such jokes are inappropriate and will not be tolerated in your organization. D. Suggest to the person telling the joke he go through a diversity training program. Scenario 2: You are a Manager in an organization that is trying to encourage respect for racial and ethnic diversity. You overheard an employee telling both sexist and racist jokes. What do you do?
  • 36. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 36 The most emotionally intelligent answer is C. The most effective way to create an atmosphere that welcomes diversity is to make clear in public that the social norms of your organization do not tolerate such expressions. Confronting the behavior privately lets the individual know the behavior is unacceptable, but does not communicate it to the team. Instead of trying to change prejudices (a much harder task), keep people from acting on them. A. 0 Points – Ignore it - the best way to deal with these things is not to react. B. 5 Points – Call the person into your office and explain that their behavior is inappropriate and is grounds for disciplinary action if repeated. C. 10 Points – Speak up on the spot, saying that such jokes are inappropriate and will not be tolerated in your organization. D. 5 Points – Suggest to the person telling the joke he go through a diversity training program. Answer for Scenario 2 The Racist Joke:
  • 37. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 37 Scenario 3. You are a college student who had hoped to get an A in a course that was important for your future career aspirations. You have just found out you got a C- on the midterm. What do you do? A. Sketch out a specific plan for ways to improve your grade and resolve to follow through. B. Decide you do not have what it takes to make it in that career. C. Tell yourself it really doesn't matter how much you do in the course, concentrate instead on other classes where your grades are higher. D. Go see the professor and try to talk her into giving you a better grade.
  • 38. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 38 The most emotionally intelligent answer is A. A key indicator of self-motivation, also known as Achievement motivation, is your ability to form a plan for overcoming obstacles to achieve long-term goals. While focusing efforts on classes where you have a better opportunity may sometimes be productive, if the goal was to learn the content of the course to help your long-term career objectives, you are unlikely to achieve. A. 10 Points – Sketch out a specific plan for ways to improve your grade and resolve to follow through. B. 0 Points – Decide you do not have what it takes to make it in that career. C. 5 Points – Tell yourself it really doesn't matter how much you do in the course, concentrate instead on other classes where your grades are higher. D. 0 Points – Go see the professor and try to talk her into giving you a better grade. Answer for Scenario 3 The 'C' Midterm:
  • 39. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 39 In Conclusion: Key to Success  Every company that wants to excel in the future must recognise that the ultimate competitive advantage is a deep leadership pool where leaders at every level are in tune with external changes and can adapt to the speed and depth of those changes.  Leadership can’t be taught in a classroom alone, but developmental experiences – executive coaching, mentoring, executive Masterclass, voracious readings – can accelerate a leader’s growth.
  • 40. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 40 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03o1JZ7c7gI Video on What Makes a Great Leader?
  • 41. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 41 If you do tomorrow what you did yesterday Your Future is History…………… If you do tomorrow what we’ve covered today Your Future is Historic!!! Final Thoughts…
  • 42. Copyright @2013 Centre for Executive Education Pte Ltd www.ipma.com.sg/cee/php 42 Prof Sattar Bawany CEO, Centre for Executive Education (CEE) C-Suite Master Executive Coach, EDA Strategic Advisor, IPMA Asia Pacific Email: sattar.bawany@qscasia.com Articles: www.ipma.com.sg/publications.php Slideshare: www.slideshare.net/ipma_singapore LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/bawany Facebook: www.facebook.com/ipma.singapore Twitter: www.twitter.com/sattarbawany Further Dialogue on Social Media