Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
The 5% Factor_presentation w/ notes
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

The 5% Factor_presentation w/ notes

409
views

Published on

A framework for keeping both minds and culture open as a regular practice - 5% of the time - with the other 95% dedicated to ongoing execution.

A framework for keeping both minds and culture open as a regular practice - 5% of the time - with the other 95% dedicated to ongoing execution.

Published in: Business

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
409
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Tremendous challenges: economy, demographics, energy, etc. that are real, structural,  deep   get ready!    But greatest challenge is preparing for  increasing complexity and rate of change while  managing overwhelming pressures to deliver now  1
  • 2. GE’s L.I.G. program:  The eternal management challenge of balancing the short term and  the long term— or simultaneously managing the present and creating the future—was  explicitly addressed.    Immelt: As he explained in the company’s 2007 annual report, the program’s aim was “to  embed growth into the DNA of our company.” By that he meant getting the teams leading  the businesses to think about organic growth day in and day out—to be constantly on the  look out for opportunities and to create inspirational strategic visions that would enlist their  troops in the cause. He wanted them to weave innovation and growth into every aspect of  their businesses.   2
  • 3. Two domains of change: external forces, and the force of human agency. Understanding  how both work is critical to making smarter, better choices, aligning current realities with  future potentials.    CHANGE: Take it! Take all of it!  Make the most of it!    1ST: Understand the systems, how things work  2nd: Ask BIG questions  (find intersection of trends with your interests/I.P./emerging  opportunities)  3rd: Choose and act, choose, and act, choose and act; a continual iterative process,  managed by 5% of time, talent, and resources.    CHOOSE! You can choose to be patient or impatient…Fearful or courageous…Resistant or  enthusiastic…      3
  • 4. Our future ‐‐ and the social, economic, and environmental crises of our time ‐‐ spring from  just four constant and predictable forces. Understand how they work together to drive  change, and you can stake out a territory that is yours to invent and own — for the long‐ term.    The 4 Forces of Change:  1. Resources  2. Technology  3. Demographics  4. Governance (rule of law, rule of markets as adaptive and reactive mechanisms  to change)    4
  • 5. Short‐term gains always have the upper hand because  • Humans tend to choose certainty (or the illusion of it) over ambiguity  • Rewards and incentives are structured for short‐term gains, especially in business and  government  • We trust what we can perceive, not abstractions  • So, we need to “make sense” of the future!  • Excursions and experiential learning helps our brains process information  concretely.   • Exploration of what’s new, what’s possible, is most effective when there’s a  sensory element. Getting a ‘picture’ of certain conditions, and interacting with  information outside your everyday world is required for new insights and ideas  to arise.  • Focused by a guiding question or challenge, these activities are the heart of the  5% Factor, and the means by which you (individual, team, organization)  integrate Newing Better into Knowing and Doing Better.  • Field trips to museums, parks, restaurants, neighborhoods, concerts…  • Movies, music, videos, art, performances…  • Experts from fields outside your business, i.e. philosophers, economists,  engineers, artists, kids, detectives, social entrepreneurs, linguists,  mediators…  • Games, humor, physical challenges, collages, found objects…  5
  • 6. Change Literacy: How the brain perceives and creates change    Problem‐solving, creativity, insight , “knowing” use the same neurological pathways, on  the right side of the brain.    Our imagination is constrained by two things:  1. Quantity and diversity of memories  2. Associative fluency  So, in order to create new visions of the future, to generate new insights and ideas, you  have to create new memories! How? By pouring in new information and stirring it up.    Pour & Stir  1. Pour in New experience, information, stimuli  2. Stir it up through playful activities (described on the previous page)      6
  • 7. Playing by the rules of the 5% Factor, you must design processes to support dominant  functions and modalities of the two hemispheres.   Left: Begin with analysis to determine the question that gets to the core of the  matter;   Right: follow with a structured exploration (right brain: New) to ‘make sense’ of  unknown/future conditions;   Left: conclude with a strong edit of collected ideas and insights, prioritize, choose  projects and create action plans.    Use the right tools and activities  for the job!   Refrain from using meetings as your primary process tool!  • Meetings are best for reports and updates, but ill‐suited to problem‐solving  • Ideation  = Left brain; solution‐driven  • Innovation = Right brain ; inquiry‐driven  7
  • 8. ALL progress is iterative!!      Continued refinement of questions and of exploration  reveals better material over time.  Don’t get stopped waiting to ‘figure it out’ first.  It’s an innovation‐killer.  Beware of “Best Practicide”!  8
  • 9. Change Literacy: The Four Forces      Market and cultural trends occur at the surface and reveal more about how we’re currently  adapting to change.     By the time you’re tracking them, the window of opportunity for innovation is nearly gone.  9
  • 10. The four forces = 4 pillars of human society:    1. Resources (naturally‐occurring assets)  2. Technology (tools for extracting value from assets, and inventing new forms)  3. Demographics (composition and size is a major determinant of group’s sustainability  4. Governance (rules of law and markets; social constructions for distributing and  managing assets within the group)    A cross‐section through any industry, sector, geography, or time in history reveals their  influence as both constant and connected.    10
  • 11. Critical thresholds in food, land, water, energy, environment, climate  Acute and potentially dramatic tipping points  11
  • 12. Extending our capabilities in every realm. Enormous challenges to our values and world  views. Merging capacities in G.R.I.N. technologies:  • Genetics  • Robotics  • Information Technology  • Nanotechnology  12
  • 13. One of the biggest challenges, dismayingly absent from most strategic discussions  13
  • 14. Rules of law are generally reactive; markets are better at leading.  The two work together  to shape our future, and is how/where we can effect change.  14
  • 15. Pour & Stir!!!!    15
  • 16. Discovery = don’t know what you’re going to find.   Lead with “Like That!” exercises and play to see what emerges  16
  • 17. Problem Solving  KNOW:  Study structural and systemic factors  Define issue in those terms  Determine your Best Question  NEW:  Explore  Invent  DO:  Execute  5% Factor    17
  • 18. Once you’ve achieved your biggest, boldest, most inspired vision of a proprietary  opportunity – given proscribed conditions and potentials – it’s time to factor reality back  in.   You do so by reverse‐engineering the vision, and applying best guesstimates of  measurable resources needed, and outcomes expected. Critically, you must also inventory  the assumptions that support those measures.  18
  • 19. Short‐term = Duh!  Mid‐term = Love it!!  Long‐term = OMG!!!!  19
  • 20. Because each product category references the same vision, efficiencies are built‐in across  intellectual property, product development, markets, etc.    Get it tight into quarterly outcomes and deliverables.  20
  • 21. Jeffery Immelt, CEO, General Electric:     Our R&D budget is the one budget that isn't being cut in this downturn, and that's a  course of action I'd recommend to every company that wants to get through this  economic crisis even stronger than before.  21
  • 22.   5% New is the key to anticipating and leading change within your organization  22
  • 23. My 5% Factor approach to building a culture of innovation has worked for these organizations, and public utilities, universities, NGOs, Silicon Valley start-ups too! 23
  • 24. The intelligent practice of strategy follows the same principles, and is why cultivating Change Literacy within your organization is vital to your future. 24
  • 25. 25

×