Curso Introducción al Diseño Curricular de 6° Año Escuela SecundariaTrabajo FinalProject: FOOD FOR EVERYONE6° Año Escuelas...
FOOD FOR EVERYONEPART 11.- What do you think about the following statements?Write T –F and support your answers.  a)   The...
4.- As you read the article, compare your answers with the ones given byMeredith Bower from Discovery Channel.       Why m...
6. - Working with Modal verbs.     Put the following statements in order of certainty._____Agricultural biotechnology migh...
Land……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…………………PART 21.- Do you think genetically modified food should be subjec...
3. - Work in pairs and look for information about Regulations in Argentina aboutthis issue at home.- Surf the internet.- G...
PART 3                             THIS IS NOT THE END OF THE STORY1. - Let’s see how much you know about agriculture.Take...
o       crops grown to protect the soilcrops grown immediately after harvestcrops that have been genetically modified10. W...
b) Are you an expert in agriculture?http://curiosity.discovery.com/question/sustainable-farming-feed-nations              ...
Green revolution technologies and strategies, reliant on monoculture and chemical fertilizers andpesticides, have destroye...
How could agricultural biotechnology help people whoneed food?Answered by Discovery ChannelPlanet GreenBesides adhering to...
IT IS TIME TO DEBATEHow many people dont have enough food to be healthy?Answered by Jessika Toothman and Planet Green1.Con...
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  1. 1. Curso Introducción al Diseño Curricular de 6° Año Escuela SecundariaTrabajo FinalProject: FOOD FOR EVERYONE6° Año Escuelas de Educación Agropecuaria Unit of Work Alumnas: Etchepare, Georgina Area, Cecilia Beatriz
  2. 2. FOOD FOR EVERYONEPART 11.- What do you think about the following statements?Write T –F and support your answers. a) There will be shortage of food in the future. b) Seed can be genetically modified. c) All genetically modified crops are resistant to pesticides nowadays. d) Scientists can develop techniques to increase crops yields.2. - Read the following article from Discovery Channel and answer a) Define genes. b) How do scientists modifify genes? c) What are the advantages of engineering crops?Scientists can transplant genes from one organism into the cells of another organism. Genesare what give organisms specific features. Using precise methods, scientists can engineercrops so that they grow in a wider range of conditions. They can also make plants resistantto herbicides and pesticides or even increase crop yields. These new plants could, in theory,grow in regions that traditionally have trouble supporting crops...http://curiosity.discovery.com/question/agricultural-biotechnology-solve-hunger3.- Think about these statements and complete them. Discuss your ideas withyour classmates. a) By the 2050, the world´s population will reach…………………………………………………………. b) Agricultural biotechnology could be a solution of world ………………………..…………………. c) Scientists looking towards the future are engineering…………………………………….……….. d) The food production will have to increase by about………………...…percent in the years between 2009 and 2050. e) The golden rice developed by the Swiss scientists in 1999 is …………………………………… f) If the problem of world hunger is to be solved, countries must………………………………..
  3. 3. 4.- As you read the article, compare your answers with the ones given byMeredith Bower from Discovery Channel. Why might agricultural biotechnology fail to solve world hunger? Answered by Meredith Bower and Discovery ChannelAmong the tools used by todays farmers is agricultural biotechnology. As crucial to their operations as tractors andtrucks, biotechnology is allowing many farmers to cultivate healthier, heartier plants and animals. In addition toimproved quality, it also results in greater production and more affordable food. Scientists, looking toward the future,are engineering plants that produce more, last longer, are more nutritious and even help fight disease. Given thebenefits of agricultural biotechnology, its logical to think it could be a solution to the problem of world hunger.The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations has projected that by 2050 the worlds population willreach 9 billion. In order to end the current hunger crisis and feed the growing population, food production will haveto increase by about 70 percent in the years between 2009 and 2050 [source: FAO]. Climate change, decreasednumbers of farmers and limited natural resources -- including basic resources like land and water -- add to thescope of the problem. Essentially, fewer people must grow more food on less land.Is agricultural biotechnology a solution? Proponents believe it can be, and some use "golden rice" as an example.Developed by the Swiss scientists in 1999, the grain is high in vitamin A and iron. The enriched rice can feed thehungry and lower the incidence of anemia, and at the same time it can help eradicate the blindness that comes withvitamin A deficiency. In developing nations, where rice is a staple, golden rice has the potential to save millions oflives [source: Bio]. Yet, despite the benefits of preventing starvation and malnutrition, golden rice has faced bans inthe European Union and in much of Africa. Why? It is a genetically modified organism (GMO), and GMOs aretypically prohibited in the EU [source: Simmons].If the problem of world hunger is to be solved, countries must weigh the benefits and risks of agriculturalbiotechnology, as it deeply affects humankinds ability to provide safe food for all. Furthermore, we must rememberthat, whatever the appeal of any one particular agricultural practice, we should always work to help provideconsumers the right to choose how their food is grown.5. - After reading the article, indicate if each statement is true or false. a) _________She says that Agricultural biotechnology is the only solution to the problem of world hunger. b) _________She continues to add that more people must grow more food in more land. c) _________In developing nation, where rice is stable rice has some bans in the European and in much of Africa. d) _________Countries don´t have to consider the benefits and risks of agricultural biotechnology as it deeply affects humankind‘s ability to provide food for everyone. e) ________ She argues that, we should try to provide consumers the right to choose the food however it is grown.
  4. 4. 6. - Working with Modal verbs. Put the following statements in order of certainty._____Agricultural biotechnology might fail to solve the world hunger_____Given the benefits of agricultural biotechnology, it is logical to think it could be asolution to the problem of world hunger._____Food production will have to increase about 70% in the years between the 2009and 2050._____The food and agricultural organization of the United Nations has proyected that by2050 the world´s population will reach 9 billion._____Proponents believe that agricultural biotechnology can be a solution._____Golden rice can help erradicate the blindness that comes with vitamin A deficiency.7. - Expanding your knowledge.Look for information on the Internet or in newspapers about the current situation aboutfood production, agricultural biotechnology and scientists views on the future of Argentinaas an Agricultural Export Nation.For example find out about corn or soy genetically modified with sunflower genesAFP: Sunflower gene spliced into soybean to boost yieldwww.google.com/.../ALeqM5iPHCy... -27 Apr 2012 – SANTA FE, Argentina — Researchers in Argentina have isolated a ... Shesaid the genetically modified crops also performed better in salty soil ...8. – FINAL TASK.Talking and Writing.Discuss your ideas about the future of food production in Argentine. Then, write about it.Use might – can be- will- won´t- could to develop your points of views.WORD BANK cultivate engineer produce grow turn down increase decrease help believe fight eradicate prevent reach project lower anemia ban prohibit feed affect safe food hunger resources biotechnology farmers heartier plants diseases affordable food quality nutritious food population land natural resources starvationIn Argentina, scientists…………………………………………………………………………..………………………………Population …………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………………..Agricultural biotechnology………………………………………………………………………………………………………Food production………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………The government……………………………………………………………………………………….…………………………….Citizens ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………Poor people……………………………………………………………………………………………………….……………………..
  5. 5. Land……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…………………PART 21.- Do you think genetically modified food should be subjected to some governmentalregulation? Discuss and then let’s see what Ellen has to say.2. - As you read, try to answer the following questions. a) What are the advantages of improving crops resistant to pesticides or viruses? b) Why some people avoid eating genetically modified foods? c) What type of regulations does The United States have? d) Which is the organization in charge of regulating the sales of bioengineered foods? e) What do the developers have to introduce a new product on the market? f) Is it an easy process? Why or why not? g) What is the role of the Congress in the regulation of bioengineered foods? How long does it take for genetically modified crops to hit the market? Answered by Ellen Stockstill and Discovery Channel Genetically modified crops, also known as GM or GMOs, are crops whose DNA structure has been altered. Scientists have modified the genetic makeup of some crops to make them more resistant to pesticides or viruses. By improving crops resistance, developers hoped that farmers could produce more crops at a lower cost. Genetically modified crops were introduced commercially in 1996 and have become increasingly more common since. According to the USDA, in 2004, 46 percent of corn, 76 percent of cotton, and 85 percent of soybeans were biotechnology plantings [source: USDA]. Some people avoid eating genetically modified foods, thinking that they pose a risk to the environment and to human health. One reason why people are concerned is that there has been very little research done on possible long-term effects on humans. Some countries have strict regulations on genetically modified foods. The United States Food and Drug Administration requires that a food be labeled as genetically modified only if its nutritional content changes in the modification process or if the process introduces a common allergen. The FDA calls genetically modified crops bioengineered foods, and the agency determines what food can be sold in our supermarkets. In order to put a new genetically modified food on the market, the developer must enter into a consultation process with the FDA during which the developer must prove that the new product adheres to the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. To do this, the developer must submit a summary of the new foods safety and nutritional assessment and meet with FDA scientists, if necessary, to discuss the information presented or supporting the assessment. This consultation process can be AFTER READING Are genetically modified food labeled in Argentina? Support process varies, precarious, lengthy and painstaking. Although the length of thisyour answers. it can take years. Some foods can make it far into the process and then be turned down. Recently, Congress voted to stop the FDA from approving genetically modified salmon for human consumption. The salmon would have been the first genetically modified animal sold for food.
  6. 6. 3. - Work in pairs and look for information about Regulations in Argentina aboutthis issue at home.- Surf the internet.- Go to the supermarkets and see if the products have any type of label with specificinformation about genetically modified foods.4. - FINAL TASKWrite a short paragraph about the current situation in our country on this issue(Use the previous texts as models.)
  7. 7. PART 3 THIS IS NOT THE END OF THE STORY1. - Let’s see how much you know about agriculture.Take the quiz!CAN FARMING BENEFIT US AND THE ENVIRONMENT? Sustainable farming practices might sound like something out of a science fiction movie, but the truth is simpler than it seems. Find out how sustainable agriculture is changing the way farmers, animals and the environment interact.1. What exactly is sustainable agriculture?o the same as organic farmingo using ecological processes to run an effective farming structureo agriculture that provides ongoing financial rewards2. Which of the following animals can be helpful in getting rid of pests?o beeso birdso butterflies3. What are soil innoculants?o vaccines for the soilo bacteria grown to improve soil healtho products used to treat soil contamination4. What is crop rotation?o planting crops in different areas to preserve the soilo alternating between two crops in one area of soilo never planting the same crop in the same place more than once5. What’s vertical farming?o farms set up in vertical structures ressembling skyscraperso crops that grow vertically, such as corn and wheato a worldwide greenhouse project6. What’s the most ecologically friendly way to remove weeds?o herbicideso inserting insect predatorso physical removal7. What is integrated pest management?o killing more than one type of pest at onceo mixing prevention and elimination methodso getting rid of weeds without affecting the crops8. What’s the best way to deal with water shortage issues?o choosing crops that are drought-resistanto watering on alternate dayso installing irrigation systems9. What are cover crops?
  8. 8. o crops grown to protect the soilcrops grown immediately after harvestcrops that have been genetically modified10. What are the benefits of managed grazing?o more complete nutrition for the animalso weed control without the need for pesticideso both of the above11. What is crop diversity?o alternating crops to protect the soilo planting several crops at once in the same areao planting different species of the same plant together12. Which of the following is not a natural soil fertilizer?o limeo wood asho manure13. What form of alternative energy is more commonly used in farms?o hydropowero solaro wind14. Which of the following is not a benefit of selling crops locally?o higher profitso less environmental pollutiono less energy consumption15. What is wastewater agriculture?o a problem caused when crop remains contaminate watero the practice of treating and reusing wastewater to water cropso a problem caused by using contaminated water on crops16. Which sustainable-farming practice is being used to farm in space?o pest managemento hydroponicso crop rotation17. What is low-input agriculture?o using the least possible amount of chemicals and artificial productso planting small crops to preserve soil and water resourceso planting crops that require no care or pest management18. Which of the following does not improve soil fertility?o crop rotationo ploughing and airing the soilo pest management19. What is in-vitro meat?o a name for a type of crop fertilizero a process to improve the quality of meato meat grown in laboratories20. What is green manure?o cover cropso artificial manure2. - Check your answers with your partners. a) How many correct answers have you got?
  9. 9. b) Are you an expert in agriculture?http://curiosity.discovery.com/question/sustainable-farming-feed-nations WHAT DIFFERENT PEOPLE SAY…3. - As you read the next three texts, complete the following chart aboutgenetically modified food. FOR AGAINSTPut aside prejudicesPaul Collier is a professor of economics at Oxford University and the director of the Center for theStudy of African Economies. He is the author of “The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries AreFailing and What Can Be Done About It.”The debate over genetically modified crops and food has been contaminated by political and aestheticprejudices: hostility to U.S. corporations, fear of big science and romanticism about local, organicproduction.Refusing genetic modification makes a difficult problem more complex.Food supply is too important to be the plaything of these prejudices. If there is not enough food weknow who will go hungry.Genetic modification is analogous to nuclear power: nobody loves it, but climate change has made itsadoption imperative. As Africa’s climate deteriorates, it will need to accelerate crop adaptation. Aspopulation grows it will need to raise yields. Genetic modification offers both faster crop adaptation anda biological, rather than chemical, approach to yield increases.Continue Reading if you wantThe Failure of Gene-Altered CropsVandana Shiva is the founder of Navdanya, the movement of 500,000 seed keepers and organic farmersin India. She is author of numerous books, including “The Violence of the Green Revolution” and “Soil,Not Oil.”Food security over the next two decades will have to be built on ecological security and climateresilience. We need the real green revolution, not a second “Green Revolution” based on geneticengineering.We need biodiversity intensification that works with nature’s nutrient and water cycles, not against them.Genetic engineering has not increased yields. Recent research by Doug Gurian-Sherman of the Union ofConcerned Scientists published as a study “Failure to Yield” has shown that in a nearly 20 year record,genetically engineered crops have not increased yields. The study did not find significantly increasedyields from crops engineered for herbicide tolerance or crops engineered to be insect-resistant.The International Assessment of Agricultural Science and Technology for Development carried out by400 scientists over four years has also concluded that genetic engineering does not hold much promise.Instead, small farms based on principles of agri-ecology and sustainability produce more food.That is why I am so disappointed that the Gates Foundation in its global development program issupporting the use of genetically modified crops in Africa.
  10. 10. Green revolution technologies and strategies, reliant on monoculture and chemical fertilizers andpesticides, have destroyed biodiversity, which has in many places led to a decline in nutrition output peracre.As I have shown in my book “Soil, Not Oil,” industrial systems of food production are also a majorcontributor to greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. Industrial monocultures are morevulnerable to climate change since they reduce soil organic matter which is vital for moistureconservation and resilience to draught.The claim by the genetic engineering industry that without genetically modified food we cannot respondto climate change is simply false. Climate resilient traits in crops have been evolved by farmers overcenturies. In the community seed banks that I have helped create through the Navdanya movement, wehave seeds for drought resistance, flood resistance and salt tolerance. This is the biological capital forthe real green revolution.The gene giants are now pirating and patenting the collective and cumulative innovation of Third Worldfarmers. Patent monopolies on seed cannot create food security. They can only push small farmers indebt.The green revolution that we are building through Navdanya is based on conserving biodiversity andconserving water while increasing food production per acre. What we need is biodiversityintensification, not chemical intensification. What we need is to work with nature’s nutrient cycles andhydrological cycle, not against them. It is time to put small farmers, especially women, at the heart ofthis process.
  11. 11. How could agricultural biotechnology help people whoneed food?Answered by Discovery ChannelPlanet GreenBesides adhering to organic principles, there are six principles practitioners of biodynamic agriculturefollow. Plant diversity, planting a variety of plants and mixing crops helps replace nutrients in the soil.Crop rotation and raising an assortment of animals encourages healthy soil and fewer parasites, pestsand weeds. Composting creates healthy soil, humus and nitrogen to support healthy crops. Ninehomeopathic solutions from extracts of animal manure, plants and minerals are sprayed to treatcompost, soil and plants. And life force acknowledges the importance of moon phases as well ascelestial and seasonal cycles impact on the farm.http://curiosity.discovery.com/question/what-principles-of-biodynamic-agriculture
  12. 12. IT IS TIME TO DEBATEHow many people dont have enough food to be healthy?Answered by Jessika Toothman and Planet Green1.ContributorJessika ToothmanMalnourishment is a serious threat to the health and wellbeing of many people across the planet. Alsoknown as undernourishment, it can lead to both long term and short term health issues, and is often aself-sustaining cycle closely linked to poverty. The Food and Agriculture Organization estimated thatthere were close to a billion people -- 925 million -- who went undernourished at some point in 2010.Two thirds of those people can be found in just seven countries: China, India, Ethiopia, Bangladesh,Indonesia, Pakistan and the Democratic Republic of Congo. In terms of how many people in a region areundernourished compared to the general population, sub-Saharan Africa ranks first. About 30 percent ofthe people who live there do not get enough food to be healthy.According to the United Nations, more than 1 billion people go without enough food to be healthy. Thishas prompted the U.N. to declare world hunger as the worst health risk worldwide. While the globalproduction of food might be enough to meet the needs of the globes population, complicated issues suchas transportation, politics and economics can prevent those in need from receiving what is otherwiseexcess food.4. - Read the previous texts and think about world hunger.Are you for or against genetically modified food? Write down your ideas.5. - FINAL TASK a) You are citizens and as such you have different points of views. Now choose one of the roles and be ready to support your ideas. You can be a farmer, a scientist, a member of the Congress, a consumer, a doctor, a member of the Green Movement, a mother whose child is malnourished, a teacher of Biology, and a sales representative of an Inoculants Company or a student from the Technical Agricultural School. b) Act out the different roles as if you were in a public assembly about hunger and malnourishment. The debate will be filmed and uploaded to YouTube. c) The conclusions will be translated into Spanish and the documents will be given to the local authorities.

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