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Green Planning
 

Green Planning

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  • EPA’s assessment tool helps local gov’t entities analyze their programs for how well they incorporate green building standards throughout all their codes: Sustainable Sites & Responsible Land Use Development Materials and Resource Conservation Energy Conservation & Atmospheric Quality Water Efficiency, Conservation, & Management Indoor Environmental The Borough can expand upon the current CID green building incentive to create a program similar to successful programs in Arlington, VA and Seattle Washington and base our incentives on the goals set out in Resolution 944, the 2009 Strategic Plan and the Centre Region Comprehensive Plan Update.
  • The Borough can take advantage of energy efficiency rebate programs and tax incentives to obtain voluntary compliance with a new program and lead by example through efforts to pursue public green building projects. The Borough can also take advantage of county-wide land use planning documents. There has been a clear failure to achieve community-wide goals for Resolution 944 that could be countered with a comprehensive green planning program, if the program takes into account best management practices to achieving smart growth. Many green building programs are housed in building codes offices rather than zoning offices and many municipalities wield greater control over utilities than the Borough, limiting the effectiveness of many green building incentive options. At this point we need to determine what our priorities will be in a green building program and how far the program should extend.
  • Trends 9.4% population growth, associated housing growth Decrease in vacant properties Greatest number of vacant properties in residential (R-2, R-3) and commercial zones (CP-2) Increase in student population High housing cost throughout the borough, yet few regions where cost is greater than 30% of median household income Steady increase in housing size until 2008: smaller homes becoming more desirable since Growth projected in the West End
  • -LEED and ENERGY STAR have the most data to back their claims. -Enterprise Green Communities and the NAHB, National Green Building Standard show some promise and more flexibility for rural-suburban development issues. -NAHB has an easy to use highly accessible scoring tool.
  • There is not a one-size fits all guideline for green building. See report for analysis of guideline performance.
  • Example most closely resembling the conditions in State College.

Green Planning Green Planning Presentation Transcript

  • Green Building Program: Step-by-Step Guide to Implementation
  • What Makes a Building “Green”?
    • Site
      • Maintains sustainable sites
      • Promotes responsible land use
      • Can promote smart growth principles
    • Water
      • Conserves potable water
      • Manages stormwater
    • Energy
      • Conserves energy
      • Improves air quality
      • Mitigates climate impact of GHG’s
    • Materials
      • Conserves resources & reduces waste
      • Promotes the use of recycled & environmentally friendly materials
    • Healthy Indoor Environment
      • Improves indoor air quality
      • Increases workplace productivity
    • Innovative Design
      • Inspires innovative design to achieve certification
      • Provides a framework for addressing community issues
  • Guide to “Developing Green Building Programs” Global Green USA (2008). “Developing Green Building Program: A Step-by-Step Guide for Local Governments.” http://www.globalgreen.org/docs/publication-71-1.pdf
  • Development Timeline Global Green USA (2008). “Developing Green Building Program: A Step-by-Step Guide for Local Governments.” http://www.globalgreen.org/docs/publication-71-1.pdf
  •  Action: Establish Baseline
    • Review Current Ordinances & Plans
      • Utilize EPA assessment tool
    • What can we expand upon?
      • Ordinances
        • CID Green Building Incentive
        • Storm Water Management
      • Building Codes
        • Possible changes by 2013 to the Universal Construction Code
      • Plans
        • Resolution 944 goals
        • State College 2009 Strategic Plan
        • Centre Region Comprehensive Plan Update
    Environmental Protection Agency (June 2010). “Sustainable Design and Green Building Toolkit for Local Governments.” www.epa.gov/region4/recycle/green-building-toolkit.pdf
  • Decisions: Identify Existing Efforts & Gaps
    • Existing Efforts
      • Leading by Example (Municipality & PSU)
      • Land Use Planning
      • Energy Efficiency Rebates & Loans from Gov’t & Utilities
    • Gaps
      • Failure to meet Community-wide Resolution 944 Goals
      • Lack of influence on building code decisions
      • Lack of municipally owned utilities
    • Priorities
      • Utilize planning documents to identify priorities
      • Green Building and/or Smart Growth?
      • Zoning Ordinance Only or Green Building Suite of Programs?
  •  Action: Analyze Building Trends Centre Regional Planning Agency (17 Aug 2009). “State College Borough Forecasting.” Centre County Growth Forecast Project: 2009-2040. http://www.crcog.net/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC={E4D20872-1197-4AC3-9AC9-2CD4C6501C13}
  • Decisions: Identify Priority Sectors & Projects
    • Greatest projected growth areas in State College
      • Multi-family housing
      • Public/semi-public
      • Greater growth in hotel-retail than surrounding townships
      • Additions/Renovations
    • Greatest community interest
      • West-end Redevelopment
      • Downtown master plan
      • Mixed-age communities
    • Planning interests
      • Reduce spot zoning
      • Public-private partnerships
      • Maintaining the character of neighborhoods
  •  Action: Review Existing Guidelines
    • General Plan
      • 2009 Strategic Plan
    • Ordinances
      • CID Green Building Incentive
    • Environmental Programs
      • Resolution 944
    • Guidelines for Commercial Buildings
      • LEED for New Construction, Existing Buildings, & Neighborhoods
      • Green Globes
      • Designed to earn EPA ENERGY STAR
    • Guidelines for Affordable Green Housing
      • Enterprise Green Communities
      • LEED for Homes & Neighborhoods
      • EPA ENERGY STAR for Homes
      • NAHB, National Green Building Standard
    • Municipally Developed Guidelines
      • Provide an opportunity to tailor development to community needs, typically in form of checklist
      • Example; Doylestown, PA “Green Points” Incentive Program
  • Decisions: Choose or Develop Guideline
    • Recommendations
      • Use commercial guideline as a checklist for zoning ordinance
      • If developing a municipal guideline, allow for commercial certification by assigning appropriate number of points for each level of certification. (e.g. 60 points for LEED-NC silver)
      • Use most appropriate guidelines for different thresholds
    • Is LEED the Leader?
      • LEED is seen as the standard w/ local or state additions
      • Other commercial options, not listed previously (e.g. GA, FL, OR, CA, & Boulder, Scottsdale)
      • LEED ≠ Energy Efficiency
      • LEED = Decreased vacancy & higher rent
  •  Conduct Outreach
    • Form Green Building Team
      • Planning staff
      • City Manager
      • Public Works
    • Form Focus Groups
      • Invite external stakeholders to review proposed plans
      • Meet at least 3 times throughout the process
        • 1 st meeting: Information Sharing
        • 2 nd meeting: Initial Proposals
        • 3 rd meeting: Program Revisions
    • Key Questions:
      • What thresholds for participation should be established?
      • What guideline is appropriate?
      • Should it be a mandatory or voluntary program?
      • How should the program link to and be consistent with local ordinances policies and programs?
      • What other programs will/can enhance a the green zoning program?
  •  Establish Framework
    • Sample Framework
      • Building Type
      • Mandatory or Voluntary
      • Threshold
      • Guideline
      • Requirement/Criteria
      • Incentives
    • Incentive Options
      • Education
      • Density Bonus
      • Grants & Rebates
      • Low-interest Loans
      • Expedited Processing
      • Recognition/Awards
    • Key Questions:
      • Are incentives necessary?
      • Will existing staff need training?
      • Are new staff members required?
      • What is the funding source for the program?
  •  Implementation
    • Program
      • Adoption
      • Phasing of the components
      • Training staff
      • Providing a source of funding for marketing and incentives
      • Preparing for future revisions
    • Key Steps:
      • Demystify green building
      • Insure staff capacity to handle implementation
      • Intiate program by announcing an upcoming public green building project
      • Plan for and dedicate time to education and marketing
  • Example Framework Building Type Mandatory or Voluntary Threshold Guideline Criteria Incentive Municipal Buildings Mandatory >5,000 SF LEED-NC, EB & CL LEED Silver Leading by Example Municipal Buildings Voluntary <5,000 SF LEED-NC, EB & CL Register w/LEED, submit Checklist w/ permit Leading by Example Multi-Family Residential Mandatory >100 units or 4 stories and above LEED-NC, Home Minimum: LEED Certified Density Bonus, Parking Cash-out Option, Recognition Multi-Family Residential Voluntary 4 stories and above LEED-NC, Home or Enterprise Green Communities Register and submit Checklist w/ permit Density Bonus, Parking Cash-out Option, Recognition Multi-Family Residential Voluntary 2-10 units, 3 stories or less ENERGY STAR plus local checklist or Enterprise Green Communities Verification from HERS renter Education, Recognition, Assistance w/rebate & loan opportunities
  • Example Framework Building Type Mandatory or Voluntary Threshold Guideline Criteria Incentive Tenant Improvements Voluntary >10,000 SF LEED-EB Register w/LEED, submit Checklist w/ permit Education, Recognition, Assistance w/rebate & loan opportunities Tenant Improvements Voluntary <10,000 SF Local Resource Guide None Education, Recognition, Assistance w/rebate & loan opportunities Single Family Residence Voluntary N/A Enterprise Green Communities or Local Resource Guide None Education, Recognition, Assistance w/rebate & loan opportunities
  • What are Other Local Governments Doing? American Institute of Architects (2009). “Local Leaders in Sustainability: Green Incentives.” http://www.aia.org/aiaucmp/groups/aia/documents/pdf/aias076942.pdf
  • Case Study: Arlington, VA
    • Pilot Green Building Incentive Program adopted in 1999
      • Applied only to commercial office space
      • Up to 0.25 FAR bonus density for LEED Silver certification
    • Updated in 2003
      • Pilot project left out developers not yet prepared to achieve LEED silver rating
      • All projects seeking approval for density, height or other modification from by-right zoning requirements were expected to include a LEED-Accredited professional and to incorporate a specific number of LEED points
      • Compliance linked to specific permit approvals granted throughout demolition and construction process
      • Density bonus required official LEED certification, but extended guideline to include full range of LEED award
    Arlington County, VA (27 Feb 2009). “Green Building Density Incentive Policy for Site Plan Projects.” County Board Agenda Item Meeting of March 14, 2009.
  • Case Study: Arlington, VA
    • Established the County’s Green Building Fund in 2003
      • Developers not committed to achieving a LEED rating were requested to contribute to the Fund at a rate of $0.03/SF based on the fees assessed by the USGBC
      • Used for education and outreach and LEED training
      • Raised $130,000 in 6 years
    • Results
      • 36% of site plan buildings approved since 2003 require LEED certification
      • Over 3 million SF of commercial space approved w/LEED incentive bonus (55%)
      • 3 Certified, 6 Silver, 1 Gold, 1 Platinum
      • 2,211 residential units approved w/LEED incentive bonus (25%)
      • 4% increase in the total site plan GFA added to the County
    Arlington County, VA (27 Feb 2009). “Green Building Density Incentive Policy for Site Plan Projects.” County Board Agenda Item Meeting of March 14, 2009.
  • Case Study: Arlington, VA
    • Established the County’s Green Building Fund in 2003
      • Developers not committed to achieving a LEED rating were requested to contribute to the Fund at a rate of $0.03/SF based on the fees assessed by the USGBC
      • Used for education and outreach and LEED training
      • Raised $130,000 in 6 years
    • Results
      • 36% of site plan buildings approved since 2003 require LEED certification
      • Over 3 million SF of commercial space approved w/LEED incentive bonus (55%)
      • 3 Certified, 6 Silver, 1 Gold, 1 Platinum
      • 2,211 residential units approved w/LEED incentive bonus (25%)
      • 4% increase in the total site plan GFA added to the County
    Arlington County, VA (27 Feb 2009). “Green Building Density Incentive Policy for Site Plan Projects.” County Board Agenda Item Meeting of March 14, 2009.
  • Case Study: Arlington, VA
    • Proposed Changes
      • Need greater incentives for residential green building
      • To encourage higher ratings, need to decrease FAR incentive for Certified and Silver
    Arlington County, VA (27 Feb 2009). “Green Building Density Incentive Policy for Site Plan Projects.” County Board Agenda Item Meeting of March 14, 2009. LEED Level Existing Bonus Proposed Bonus Office Residential Certified 0.15 FAR 0.05 FAR 0.10 FAR Silver 0.25 FAR 0.15 FAR 0.20 FAR Gold 0.35 FAR 0.35 FAR 0.40 FAR Platinum 0.45 FAR 0.45 FAR 0.50 FAR
  • Case Study: Arlington, VA
    • What can we learn from Arlington?
      • Need a strong enforcement mechanism
        • Arlington requires developers to post a bond or letter of credit prior to issuance of the first Certificate of Occupancy
        • No projects have defaulted on their LEED green building bonus density commitments
      • Energy efficiency is tricky
        • Arlington was satisfied by USGBC’s 2007 improvements to LEED requiring credits that amount to a 14% energy efficiency improvement upon the baseline.
        • Is a 14% improvement sufficient?
      • Single Family Home construction may need a more comprehensive program including technical assistance and recognition.
        • Arlington began the Green Home choice program
        • 60 projects certified and under construction
      • Arlington considers EPA ENERGY STAR to be the program of choice for tackling issues with existing building stock
    Arlington County, VA (27 Feb 2009). “Green Building Density Incentive Policy for Site Plan Projects.” County Board Agenda Item Meeting of March 14, 2009.
  • Useful Resources
    • Green Building Program Design
      • Global Green USA’s “Developing Green Building Programs: A Step-by-step guide for Local Governments”
      • EPA’s “Sustainable Design and Green Building Toolkit for Local Governments”
      • Web-based resource: “Playbook for Green Buildings & Neighborhoods”
      • Enterprise Green Community’s “Green Affordable Housing Policy Toolkit”
    • Incentive Systems
      • Yudelson Associates’ “Green Building Incentives That Work”
      • American Institute for Architects’ “Local Leaders in Sustainability: Green Incentives”