Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Acceptance Test-driven Development with Cucumber-jvm
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Acceptance Test-driven Development with Cucumber-jvm

1,469
views

Published on

Using Cucumber-jvm for acceptance testing. Also cover Geb and Gradle at bit.

Using Cucumber-jvm for acceptance testing. Also cover Geb and Gradle at bit.

Published in: Technology

0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,469
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
45
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Acceptance Test-driven Development (ATDD) with Cucumber-jvm (and friends) ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Christopher Bartling
  • 2. What is Acceptance Test-driven Development? • Elisabeth Hendrickson • A practice in which the whole team collaboratively discusses acceptance criteria, with examples, and then distills the criteria and examples into a set of concrete acceptance tests before development begins. • Builds a shared understanding of what we’re building and when to consider it done.
  • 3. Acceptance test-driven development cadence • Discuss the requirements and acceptance criteria for the feature, creating examples. • Distill these examples into executable test format. • Cucumber: Create features and scenarios. • Develop the feature and hook up the acceptance tests. • Cucumber: Create step definitions and page objects. • Demo the feature and successful acceptance tests.
  • 4. The acceptance test-driven cadence 4 Discuss requirements, create examples Distill examples into acceptance tests Develop features, hook up tests Demo features and acceptance tests Test-driven development
  • 5. Specification by example • Gojko Adzic • “Living documentation” • Documentation from executable specifications. • Promotes collaboration. • Efficient validation of features. • Implement features more effectively and with higher quality.
  • 6. Benefits of automated acceptance testing • Forces a thorough analysis of a feature. • Build concrete agreement about the exact behavior the feature should exhibit. • Living, executable and trustworthy documentation. • Automation allows more manual, exploratory testing. • Scalable regression testing.
  • 7. Cucumber • Tool for running automated acceptance tests written in a behavior-driven development (BDD) style. • Given - When - Then • Allows the execution of feature documentation written in business-facing text.
  • 8. Cucumber-jvm • Java implementation of Cucumber. • Supports popular JVM programming languages. • Java, Groovy, Clojure, Scala, JRuby. • Integrates with popular dependency injection containers. • Spring Framework, Guice, PicoContainer. • Support several runners: command-line, JUnit, Android.
  • 9. Groovy • Dynamic language for the Java Virtual Machine. • Supports Domain-Specific Languages (DSLs) and other compact syntax so your code becomes easy to read and maintain. • Seamlessly integrates with existing Java classes, libraries, and frameworks. • Compiles directly to standard JVM bytecode.
  • 10. Selenium WebDriver • Automated browsing. Capabilities include: • Navigating to web pages • Handling user input • Finding and interrogating the DOM • JavaScript execution • org.openqa.selenium.WebDriver is the the key Java interface against which tests should be written.
  • 11. Geb • Browser automation abstraction over WebDriver. • Provides an elegant jQuery-like content selection engine. • Built with Groovy, providing an easy to use DSL. • Useful for scripting, scraping and general automation of web browsers. • Integrates nicely with Cucumber-jvm.
  • 12. Chromedriver • Standalone server which implements WebDriver's wire protocol for Chromium. • Consists of three separate pieces: • The browser itself (“chrome") • Language bindings provided by the Selenium project ("the driver”) • Bridge server between "chrome" and the “driver" (the chromedriver binary, referred to as the “server"). • Developed by members of the Chromium and WebDriver teams.
  • 13. Gradle • Build automation tool. • Combines the power and flexibility of Ant with the dependency management and conventions of Maven into a more effective way to build. • Provides a declarative way to describe all kinds of builds through sensible defaults. • Powered by a Groovy DSL.
  • 14. Cucumber features • Plain-text functional scenarios. • Simple Given/When/Then syntax (Gherkin). • Feature files are typically written before anything else and verified by business analysts, domain experts, etc. non technical stakeholders. • Production code is then written outside-in, until the stor(ies) successfully pass.
  • 15. Cucumber feature example Feature: Navigate through the NCAA basketball tournament site
 
 Background:
 Given I navigate to the website
 
 Scenario: Navigate to the first round of the tournament
 When I click the "First round" navigation pill link
 Then I should see the first round brackets 
 
 Scenario: Navigate to the second round of the tournament
 When I click the "Second round" navigation pill link
 Then I should see the second round brackets
  • 16. Cucumber step definitions • The feature file “code-behind”. • The executable part of Cucumber. • Uses regular expressions to bind to feature file phrase. When(~'^I click the "([^"]*)" navigation pill link$') 
 { String navPillText ->
 page.$('a', text: navPillText).click()
 }
  • 17. Cucumber Support • Cucumber provides a number of hooks which allow us to run blocks at various points in the Cucumber test cycle. • Place hook implementations in file under the support directory. • Use tagged hooks if you want more fine grained control. • All defined hooks are run whenever the relevant event occurs.
  • 18. Page object pattern • Allows modeling web content in a reusable and maintainable way. • Reduces the amount of duplicated code. • If the UI changes, the fix need only be applied in one place. • Geb provides support for the Page Objects pattern through the geb.Page and geb.Module abstractions. 18
  • 19. Demonstrations
  • 20. Reflection • When you plan features, are you enumerating acceptance criteria and coming to shared understanding of Done? • Are you converting those acceptance criteria into executable examples in an automated testing framework? • What is preventing you from using acceptance test- driven development? 20
  • 21. GitHub repository • https://github.com/cebartling/ncaa-basketball- tournament • web-client: Backbone.js-based application • acceptance-tests: Cucumber-jvm project, Gradle- based build
  • 22. Resources • http://testobsessed.com/2008/12/acceptance-test- driven-development-atdd-an-overview/ • http://testobsessed.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/ atddexample.pdf • http://specificationbyexample.com/ 22
  • 23. Thank you! • Christopher Bartling • @cbartling • chris@pintailconsultingllc.com 23