Moving Forward in
Agriculture
Past achievements, current capacities and future
possibilities
Cami Ryan, B.Comm., Ph.D.
Col...
Agriculture
in the PAST
Agriculture
TODAY
PAST
Achievements
CURRENT
capacities
Agriculture
MOVING
FORWARD
Rural / urban
di...
Ag in the past…
Photo courtesy: Gail Bruckner
Govt of Canada archives
1800 to 1960…
Rasmussen 1962
Circa 1908-1915…
Rasmussen 1962
Circa 1908-1915 http://postalpicture.blogspot.ca/2010/06/harvesting.html
Data source: M. Bellis 2013
The evolution of food production
Urbanization in Canada
1851 to 2001
Reimer in Hiller’s (ed) Urban Canada: sociological perspectives 2005
Agriculture: Then and now
Old Rural Economy New Rural Economy
Homogenous culture Diverse culture
Simple & repetitive Compl...
Agriculture in Canada Today
 Important to our economy
 $70 Billion in economic activity in 2008; jobs & GDP
 Grain farm...
Past achievements
and current capacities…
Slide courtesy: Dr. Steven Savage “Applied Mythology”
Current capacities
 Moisture control of grain
 In-field control of storage pests
 Controlled atmosphere
transport/stora...
New technologies
 Precision farming (seeding,
irrigation, fertilizer, crop
protection)
 Sensor technology (water,
nitrog...
Traditional Breeding
Unguided Selection
Rootstocks for
perennials
Cloning Perennials
Ancient
Methods
Hybrid Crops
Mutagene...
Sustainability
 AAFC: “meeting the needs of
today without compromising the
needs of future generations…
improving the sta...
Issued by Direction
of Hon. W.J. Roche
Minister of the Interior
Ottawa, Canada, 1914
No till: a Western Canada story
 Reduces…
 Number of passes
 moisture loss
 Soil erosion
 Costs: fuel, labour
 55%-7...
Pesticides and use
Pesticides
with
increasing
safety and
efficient
delivery
Slide courtesy: Dr. Steven Savage “Applied Myt...
Yearning for the past?
Photo courtesy: Gail Bruckner
Social Media -> ‘just in time’ users
 72% use mobile technology (Pew Institute 2013)
 Social networks
 Social media
 R...
Words and images… misleading
Does Agriculture suffer from an
image problem?
Dog noses or space aliens?
HUMAN COGNITIVE HABITS
22
Misplaced
perceptions of
who the
EXPERTS really
are…
an
Agri-Intellectual
Celebrity influence & mass media
24
Canola 96%
Soybean 91%
Corn 77%
Sugarbeet 91%
GE crops: Canada and the world
Map Source: International Service for the Acq...
Independent organizations that attest
to safety of GMOs
American Association for the Advancement
of Science
American Medic...
27Photo: J. Kamiya-Rose
Lots of ‘good news’ stories
out there…
How about them apples?
 (almost?) Canadian success story in
the making
 Under CDN & US regulatory review
 Okanagan Spec...
Photo credit: Andy Kristian Agaba / © Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Challenges
29
No silver bullets!
“…no single agricultural technology or
farming practice will provide sufficient
food for 2050…
instead ...
Moving forward in agriculture
(S. Savage (2014))…
 Address barriers to the use of “state-of-
the-art” farming methods
 A...
32
Address the ‘gaps’ – talk
about agriculture!
10,000,000
calories,
two ‘hollow legs’
&
lots
of
‘chat’
‘Hayden’ Phenotype...
Farmers are innovative and
resilient folks…
Photo courtesy: Bill Price
Bright
future!
Foxglovefarm.com
CCAGR.com
Photocredit:DebraMurphy
BLOG: doccamiryan.wordpress.com
@DocCamiRyan
Cami Ryan on science, tech & ag
35
MOVING FORWARD IN
...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Moving Forward in Agriculture: Past achievements, current capacities and future possibilities

525 views
386 views

Published on

Presentation at the BC Dairy Seminar in Salmon Arm in March 2014

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
525
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
8
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
30
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Moving Forward in Agriculture: Past achievements, current capacities and future possibilities

  1. 1. Moving Forward in Agriculture Past achievements, current capacities and future possibilities Cami Ryan, B.Comm., Ph.D. College of Agriculture and Bioresources, University of Saskatchewan North Okanagan Dairy Seminar and Trade Show March 7, 2014 Salmon Arm, BC
  2. 2. Agriculture in the PAST Agriculture TODAY PAST Achievements CURRENT capacities Agriculture MOVING FORWARD Rural / urban divide Misinformation Misperceptions of expertise Ag’s growing image problem? Growing world population Diseases, pests, H2O shortages “…he who does not know the past can never understand the present, and he certainly can do nothing for the future.“ - J.G. Diefenbaker -
  3. 3. Ag in the past… Photo courtesy: Gail Bruckner Govt of Canada archives
  4. 4. 1800 to 1960… Rasmussen 1962
  5. 5. Circa 1908-1915… Rasmussen 1962 Circa 1908-1915 http://postalpicture.blogspot.ca/2010/06/harvesting.html
  6. 6. Data source: M. Bellis 2013 The evolution of food production
  7. 7. Urbanization in Canada 1851 to 2001 Reimer in Hiller’s (ed) Urban Canada: sociological perspectives 2005
  8. 8. Agriculture: Then and now Old Rural Economy New Rural Economy Homogenous culture Diverse culture Simple & repetitive Complex Resource commodities Services & amenities Low mobility High mobility Local relations matter External relations important Low knowledge demands High knowledge demands Reimer in Hiller (ed) Urban Canada: sociological perspectives 2005
  9. 9. Agriculture in Canada Today  Important to our economy  $70 Billion in economic activity in 2008; jobs & GDP  Grain farming & beef operations  ‘backbone’ of Canada’s ag economy  CROPS: 54.6% of total farmland  BEEF: 31.2% of total farmland  ORGANICS: # operations  2006 to 2011  Ontario and Quebec greatest gains  Ag’s changing structure:  Fewer farms, bigger farms  More renting, less owning StatsCan 2013
  10. 10. Past achievements and current capacities… Slide courtesy: Dr. Steven Savage “Applied Mythology”
  11. 11. Current capacities  Moisture control of grain  In-field control of storage pests  Controlled atmosphere transport/storage  Post-harvest treatments (fungicides, sprout inhibitors, ethylene management, waxes…)  Active packaging Slide courtesy: Dr. Steven Savage “Applied Mythology”
  12. 12. New technologies  Precision farming (seeding, irrigation, fertilizer, crop protection)  Sensor technology (water, nitrogen)  Remote sensors (drones)  Robotics in dairy farming  Wireless data transmission  3D printing  DATA!
  13. 13. Traditional Breeding Unguided Selection Rootstocks for perennials Cloning Perennials Ancient Methods Hybrid Crops Mutagenesis Breeding Wide Crosses Doubled Haploids Early to mid-20th Century Epigenetics, Transient Expression Transgenics Marker Assisted Selection Enhanced Ploidy Micro-biome Selection Gene Editing RNAi Apomixis Modern Methods Slide courtesy: Dr. Steven Savage “Applied Mythology”
  14. 14. Sustainability  AAFC: “meeting the needs of today without compromising the needs of future generations… improving the standard of living by protecting human health, conserving the environment, using resources efficiently and advancing long-term economic competitiveness.”
  15. 15. Issued by Direction of Hon. W.J. Roche Minister of the Interior Ottawa, Canada, 1914
  16. 16. No till: a Western Canada story  Reduces…  Number of passes  moisture loss  Soil erosion  Costs: fuel, labour  55%-72% of Canada’s total seeded land is cultivated using no- till/conservation till practices (StatsCan 2011; CropLife Canada) Lafond and Clayton, 2010; Bodnar, 2013; Derpsch and Moriya, 1998 Photo courtesy: M. Wipf, AB Photo courtesy: G. Stamp, AB
  17. 17. Pesticides and use Pesticides with increasing safety and efficient delivery Slide courtesy: Dr. Steven Savage “Applied Mythology”
  18. 18. Yearning for the past? Photo courtesy: Gail Bruckner
  19. 19. Social Media -> ‘just in time’ users  72% use mobile technology (Pew Institute 2013)  Social networks  Social media  Rise of the ‘citizen journalist’ (Gant 2007)  Blogs / online diarizing  Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, etc  megaphone for misinformation! 19
  20. 20. Words and images… misleading
  21. 21. Does Agriculture suffer from an image problem?
  22. 22. Dog noses or space aliens? HUMAN COGNITIVE HABITS 22
  23. 23. Misplaced perceptions of who the EXPERTS really are… an Agri-Intellectual
  24. 24. Celebrity influence & mass media 24
  25. 25. Canola 96% Soybean 91% Corn 77% Sugarbeet 91% GE crops: Canada and the world Map Source: International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA) 2014
  26. 26. Independent organizations that attest to safety of GMOs American Association for the Advancement of Science American Medical Association World Health Organization National Academy of Science Royal Society of Medicine European Commission American Council of Science and Health American Dietetics Association American Society for Cell Biology American Society of Microbiology American Society of Plant Sciences International Seed Foundation Source for Food, Agriculture and Environmental Issues Crop Science Society of America Federation of Animal Science Societies Society for Invitro Biology Society of Toxicology French Academy of Science Royal Society of London Royal Society of Canada Seven of the World’s Society of Academies Food Standards Australia New Zealand The Union of German Academics and Societies ….MORE!
  27. 27. 27Photo: J. Kamiya-Rose Lots of ‘good news’ stories out there…
  28. 28. How about them apples?  (almost?) Canadian success story in the making  Under CDN & US regulatory review  Okanagan Specialty Fruit, B.C.  Non-browning Arctic Apple™
  29. 29. Photo credit: Andy Kristian Agaba / © Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Challenges 29
  30. 30. No silver bullets! “…no single agricultural technology or farming practice will provide sufficient food for 2050… instead we must advocate for and utilize a range of these technologies in order to maximize yields.” Mark Rosegrant, Director, International Food Policy Research Institute
  31. 31. Moving forward in agriculture (S. Savage (2014))…  Address barriers to the use of “state-of- the-art” farming methods  Address the key limitations to the productivity of farmers in the developing world  Use the complete “tool box” to enable farmers to be as efficient as possible in their use of key resources Stop demonizing agriculture and imposing limits upon it which are purely about marketing and/or ideology
  32. 32. 32 Address the ‘gaps’ – talk about agriculture! 10,000,000 calories, two ‘hollow legs’ & lots of ‘chat’ ‘Hayden’ Phenotype ‘Hayden’ Genotype
  33. 33. Farmers are innovative and resilient folks… Photo courtesy: Bill Price
  34. 34. Bright future! Foxglovefarm.com CCAGR.com
  35. 35. Photocredit:DebraMurphy BLOG: doccamiryan.wordpress.com @DocCamiRyan Cami Ryan on science, tech & ag 35 MOVING FORWARD IN AGRICULTURE Cami Ryan, B.Comm., Ph.D. College of Agriculture and Bioresources University of Saskatchewan

×