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Presentation at the Wageningen Forestry Students\' Association, 29 March 2006

Presentation at the Wageningen Forestry Students\' Association, 29 March 2006

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Sacred Forests, Sacred Sites & Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Sacred Forests, Sacred Sites Cathrien de Pater 1 WSBV Sylvatica, Wageningen, 29 March 2006 1 M.Sc. Forestry Wageningen University Student M.A. Spirituality, Radboud University Nijmegen Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality (Ede)
  • 2. Contents
    • What & why ‘Sacred’?
    • Where? (India, Nepal, Netherlands)
    • Management of Sacred Sites
  • 3. What & Why?
    • What is a site/place?
    • What is ‘sacred’?
    • Why do people visit sacred sites/forests?
  • 4. What places?
    • Forests, parks, trees
    • Rocks, hills, mountains
    • Water: rivers, lakes, sea, islands
    • Lines! Songlines!
    • Graveyards, tombs
    • Shrines, temples, mosques, churches
    • Cities!
    • Remote / isolated <–----------  Close by / backyard
  • 5. Why sacred?
    • Social functions, justice
    • Dwellings of gods, demons, ancestors
    • Locus of myths
  • 6. With what purpose?
    • Place of quiet, retirement, study, ascetism
        • (Aranyaka)
    • Place of inspiration, aesthetic enjoyment
    • Place of spiritual experience & practice
  • 7. Spiritual Experiences
    • Purification
    • Healing
    • Contact with the ‘other world’
    • Balance, comfort, atonement
    • Individual experiences
    • In a group (social)
    • Individual experiences
    • In a group (social)
  • 8. Spiritual experiences
    • Purification
  • 9. Spiritual practice
    • Healing
  • 10. How do people experience?
    • Rituals
      • daily, seasonally, yearly
    • Rites of passage:
        • birth, wedding, funeral
    • Pilgrimage
  • 11. India: Maharasa
  • 12. Insights: Brhad-Aranyaka-Upanishad III-9:28
    • As a mighty tree in the forest,
    • so in truth is man,
    • his hairs are the leaves,
    • his outer skin is the bark.
    • 'From his skin flows forth blood,
    • sap from the bark;
    • and thus from the wounded man comes forth blood,
    • as from a tree that is struck.
    • 'The lumps of his flesh are the splinters of wood,
    • the fibre is strong like the tendons 
    • The bones are the hardwood within,
    • the marrow is made like the marrow of the tree.
    'But, while the tree, when felled, grows up again more young from the root, from what root does a mortal grow up, after he has been felled by death? 'Do not say, &quot;from seed,&quot; for seed is produced from the living; but a tree, springing from a grain, clearly rises again after death. 'If a tree is pulled up with the root, it will not grow again; from what root then, does a mortal grow up, after he has been felled by death? ‘ Once born, he is not born (again); for who should create him again?'
  • 13. Insights Jan van Ruusbroeck in the Zonien Forest near Brussels
  • 14. India
    • Banyatra: journey to the 12 forests in Brindaban
    based on Krshna and the Gopis (cowgirls) mythology
  • 15. Are Sacred places good for biodiversity?
    • yes and no!
    yes: access limited or denied remote places no: parts are (over) used pilgrimage -> high pressure deprivation & social erosion
  • 16. Management of Sacred Sites 1
    • Sacred Groves in Morocco
        • (Culmsee, 2006):
        • “ This outstanding floristic diversity is related to a relatively constant and moderate level of human impact”
  • 17. Management of Sacred Sites 2
    • Nepal, Andrew W. Ingles (1997):
    • “ Religious forests are not sacrosanct”
  • 18. Management of Sacred Sites 3
    • Canada: National Aboriginal Forest Association (NAFA): Aboriginal Criterion with Indicators for Sustainable Forest Management (March 2005)
  • 19. Canada 2: Lewis (2005) Cheam First Nation, B.C.: respectful land USE (not static total preservation)!
  • 20. Canada: RPF discussion 1
    • Spiritual Forest Values:
        • are intangible & difficult to measure
        • are subjective & assiciated with a moment’s (‘peak’) experience
        • evolve over time
        • influenced by setting & location and by different religions & perceptions!
        • change with structure of stands
        • change as we observe them
        • canbe created by ceremony / ritual
        • are created by history
  • 21. Canada: RPF discussion 2
    • Management issues concerning SV:
        • How can SV be managed without piecemeal approach?
        • resistance from forest workers?
        • role of foresters as advocates of SV?
        • who identifies SV?
        • How to measure & quantify SV?
        • How to manage today’s SV without compromising future generation’s SV?
        • How to reconcile individual ‘mystique’ of SV with standardised measurement?
        • How to reconcile individual SV with job requirements?
        • Who to make decisions? Community, global citizen?