Marketing to Millennials for Zoos, Aquariums, Museums & Attractions
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Marketing to Millennials for Zoos, Aquariums, Museums & Attractions

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Marketing to Millennials for Zoos, Aquariums, Museums & Attractions Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Museums,  A)rac-ons  &  Zoos:     Marke-ng  to  Gen  Y     Colleen  Dilenschneider   Director,  IMPACTS  Research   5  June  2012  
  • 2. Overview  1)  Genera-on  Y-­‐  Who  are  these  people  anyway?    2)  Marke-ng  to  Millennials  3)  Value  of  WOM  and  emerging  marke-ng  trends  4)  The  Four  “T”s  of  Online  Engagement  5)  Five  Case  studies:  “The  Best  of  the  Best  in  Online  Audience  Engagement”    
  • 3. Who  are  Millennials?  •   There  are  currently  over  90  million  Millennials              (born  1980  –  1995;  “true”  Millennials  born  1981-­‐  1989)    •  Characterized  as:     •  Entreprenuerial     •  Tech-­‐savvy   •  Public  service  mo-vated   •  En-tled  and  “over-­‐educated”   •  Connected  and  protected   •  Community-­‐oriented   •  Difficulty  with  tradi-onal  hierarchy      •  How  they  stack  up  against  Genera?on  X  and  Baby  Boomers?   •  Meaningful  work  as  “workplace  reward”  (vs.  freedom  or  -tle)   •  Had  helicopter  parents  (vs.  distant  or  controlling)   •  Crave  community  (vs.  independence  or  a)ack  oppression)  
  • 4. What  do  Millennials  do  and  care  about?   *Pew  Research  
  • 5. Tip  #1)  Sell  your  admission  89%  are  likely  or  very  likely  to  switch  from  one  brand  to  another  (price  and  quality  being  equal)  if  the  second  brand  is  associated  with  a  good  cause     66%  will  recommend   69%  consider  a  company’s  social   products/services  if  the   and  environmental  commitment   company  is  socially  responsible   when  deciding  where  to  shop      74%  of  Millennials  are  more   83%  of  Millennials  will  trust  a  likely  to  pay  a)en-on  to  a   company  more  if  it  is  socially/company’s  messages  if  the   environmentally  responsible  company  has  a  deep  commitment  to  a  cause   Source:  Cone  Millennial  Case  Study  
  • 6. Tip  #2)  It’s  about  the  experience   Millennials  are  members  of  the  “Experience  Economy”  73%  of  Millennials  will  leave  ajer  one  bad  experience;  85%  will  tell  others  about  poor  experiences     What  you  can  you  do:   Sa-sfac-on  does  not  equal   •  Create  mul-channel   loyalty   interac-ons     Millennials  want  personalized   •  Personalize  experience  by   customer  service  or  intelligent   knowing  your  audience   self-­‐service   Source:  Convergy’s  Customer  Management  
  • 7. Tip  #3)  Get  to  the  point  &  do  it  quickly   Millennials  have  A.O.A.D.D.     Always-­‐on-­‐a)en-on-­‐deficit-­‐disorder     (coined  by  Pew  Research)     “Mul-tasking  machines”     More  informa-on  than  ever   before;  a  lot  to  get  through.   A  picture  is  worth  a   thousand  words   “Connected  and  distracted”     Make  it  relevant  and  do  it  quickly  to  capture  a)en-on    
  • 8. Tip  #4)  Be  tech-­‐friendly  &  get  social   Using  social  technology  is  natural  life  occurrence  to  Millennials.   They  are  connected  and  they  grew  up  with  it   24%  of  Millennials  say   41%  of  Millennials  have  made  a   that  ‘Technology  use’  is   purchase  using  their  smartphone   what  most  makes  their   (Edelman  Digital)   genera-on  unique     74%  of   (Pew  Research  2010)   50  =  median   number  of  text   Millennials   54%  think  technology     messages   believe  that   brings  them  closer  to   Millennials  send   technology   friends  and  family     every  day     makes  life  easier   (Pew  research)   (Pew  Research  2010)   (Pew  Research)  43%  of  18-­‐24  year-­‐olds  say  that  tex-ng  is  just  aallows  people  ao  an  actual   56%  of  Millennials  think  technology   s  meaningful   t s  use  conversa-on  with  someone  fficiently  (phone  (eMarketer  2010)   their  -me  more  e over  the  Pew  research)    
  • 9. Tip  #5)  Let  everyone  be  a  curator  Millennials  value  transparency,   Remember:  everyone  on  a  engagement,  reputa-on  and   Millennial  soccer  team  was  an  communica-on   MVP     Social  media  means  business  revolves  around  the  consumer     In  large  part  due  to  social  media  and  interconnec-vity,  Millennials   have  “Warholism.”  Anyone  can  be  famous.  
  • 10. For  Gen  Y,  technology  and  connec-vity  rule  41%  of  Millennials  have  made  a   33%  of  Millennials  more  likely  purchase  using  their  smartphone   to  buy  product  if  it  has  a  (Edelman  Digital)   Facebook  page  compared  to  27%  =  approximate  decline  in   17%  of  non-­‐Millennials  email  usage  among  those  ages    (Boston  Consul-ng  Group)  12-­‐34  over  the  past  year     48%  of  Millennials  say  word-­‐(ComScore  Study  2010)   of-­‐mouth  influences  their  43%  of  18-­‐24  year-­‐olds  say  that   product  purchases  more  than  tex-ng  is  just  as  meaningful  as   TV  ads.  Only  17%  said  a  TV  ad  an  actual  conversa-on  with   prompted  them  to  buy     (Intrepid  Study  2010)  someone  over  the  phone    (eMarketer  2010)   19%  of  Millennials  have  voted   on  American  Idol  (Pew  Study  2010)  
  • 11. The  Bass  Model    “Q”  -­‐  the  coefficient  of  imita-on  -­‐  has  a  value  12.85x  greater  than  that  of  “P”-­‐  the  coefficient  of  innova-on.  This  is  cri-cally  important  to  understand  as  there  is  no  amount  of  adver-sing  or  other  forms  of  “P”  that  will  overcome  a  deficiency  of  earned  media  (i.e.-­‐  “Q”)  
  • 12. Public  sources  of  informa-on   Reach:  Via  what  channels  do  people  acquire  informa7on?   Jun  2011   Mar  2012   600   495.9   500   443.2   403.5   400  INDEX   287.6  V 300  ALU 233.8  237.0  E   200   179.6   157.2   148.7   120.6   108.4   111.6   109.6  109.1   100   76.2   71.3   74.3   69.6   54.5   50.3   12.3   9.4   9.8   9.5   8.7   8.8   0   Web   Social  media   WOM   Email   Mobile  web   Peer  review   Television   Radio  -­‐  satellite   Newspaper  -­‐   Periodicals  and   Direct  mail   Other  print   Other   web   and  terrestrial   print   magazines  -­‐   (miscellaneous)   print  
  • 13. Public  sources  of  informa-on   Trust:  How  credible  are  the  respec7ve  informa7on  channels?   Jun  2011   Mar  2012   600   500   400  INDEX   289.6  284.3  V 300  AL 245.2  242.9   243.1  244.5  UE   211.1   199.5   187.6  192.3   200   152.5   143.2   141.0  138.8   134.5   128.7   119.8   121.6   112.2   112.3   100   51.1   48.7   43.8   44.4   44.1   29.6   0   Web   Social  media   WOM   Email   Mobile  web   Peer  review   Television   Radio  -­‐  satellite   Newspaper  -­‐   Periodicals  and   Direct  mail   Other  print   Other   web   and  terrestrial   print   magazines  -­‐   (miscellaneous)   print  
  • 14. Public  sources  of  informa-on   Amplifica7on:  What  is  the  re-­‐distribu7on  poten7al  of  the  respec7ve  informa7on  channels?   Jun  2011   Mar  2012   600   500   400  INDEX  V 300  ALU 235.5  E   200   186.0   177.4  175.8   98.7   99.2   99.7   101.8   91.2   92.7   89.4   92.0   100   64.8   55.8   31.3   29.6   19.4   19.1   24.3   22.7   12.8   13.4   9.4   9.2   10.3   9.6   0   Web   Social  media   WOM   Email   Mobile  web   Peer  review   Television   Radio  -­‐  satellite   Newspaper  -­‐   Periodicals  and   Direct  mail   Other  print   Other   web   and  terrestrial   print   magazines  -­‐   (miscellaneous)   print  
  • 15. Public  sources  of  informa-on   Overall  Value:  What  are  the  weighted,  rela7ve  values  of  the  respec7ve  informa7on  channels?   Jun  2011   Mar  2012   600   500   409.3   400  INDEX  V 300   274.4   282.3   269.0  269.7  ALU 239.2  E   224.6   200   146.6   114.9   101.5   100   76.5   53.9   33.8   28.7   22.5   13.0   16.2   11.6   6.3   4.8   0.6   0.2   0.2   0.2   0.2   0.1   0   Web   Social  media   WOM   Email   Mobile  web   Peer  review   Television   Radio  -­‐  satellite   Newspaper  -­‐   Periodicals  and   Direct  mail   Other  print   Other   web   and  terrestrial   print   magazines  -­‐   (miscellaneous)   print  
  • 16. The  four  “T”s  of  online  engagement  1)  Tone   –  Let  folks  get  to  know  you   •  Is  there  a  human  being  back  there?  2)  Touchability   –  Make  it  relevant   •  Is  this  ini-a-ve  accessible  to  me?  3)  Transparency   –  Be  real  and  authen-c     •  Can  I  trust  you?  4)  Timeliness   –  Tie  it  to  current  events.  Make  it  -mely  and  urgent   •  Why  can’t  I  pay  a)en-on  to  this  later?  
  • 17. Creating excitement for a new project Winner: Museum of Science and Industry’s Month at the Museum
  • 18. The play-by-playThe Basics:•  Compe--on  to  live  one  month  in  a  glass  room  at  the  Museum  (Oct  –  Nov  2010)  •  Over  1,500  applicants  posted  60  second  YouTube  videos    •  The  winner,  Kate,  was  chosen  by  judges  and  the  public   •  460  million  impressions  •  Conducted  again  in  2011  with  Kevin  Byrne   Why it’s the best:   Tone:   •  Kate  was  chosen  by  public  -­‐  silly  and  curious   Touchability:     •  Fun  videos  built  awareness  of  the  ini-a-ve   •  Accessibility,  personal  buy-­‐in   •  Increased  a)endance  36%  in  November,  20%  in  December     Transparency   •  Wrote  a  blog,  posted    videos,  and  was  available  on-­‐site   Timeliness   •  New,  garnering  a)en-on   •  1  month  -meframe  
  • 19. Turn-around of a possible PR crisisWinner: The Shedd Aquarium vs. high dolphin calf mortality rates
  • 20. The play-by-playThe Basics:•  The  Shedd  Aquarium  shared  birth  of  dolphin  calf,  despite  high  mortality  rates  •  The  dolphin  calf  didn’t  make  it  •  Received  over  103  Facebook  comments  within  one  hour  of  pos-ng  on  Facebook  •  Comments  were  very  personal  and  empathe-c,  crea-ng  strong,  personal  -es       Why it’s the best: Tone   •  Spoke  in  layman’s  terms  (empathy)     •  Displayed  emo-on  (human  value)   Touchability   •  Allowed  themselves  to  be  sad  (did  not  distract)     •  Responded  with  thanks  (as  a  person  would  respond)   Transparency   •  Publicized  the  birth  (crea7ng  rela7onships  with  audiences)     •  Made  audiences  aware  of  threats  (addressing  them)   Timeliness   •  They  shared  the  news  on  all  channels  at  once  (respec7ng  all  audiences)   •  They  followed  up  (keep  audiences  engaged)  
  • 21. B es t   Public ditching of a social media strategy that didn’t work Winner: The Brooklyn Museum’s switch to Meetup.com
  • 22. The play-by-playThe Basics:•  Brooklyn  Museum’s  1st  Fans  ini-a-ve  dropped  Twi)er,  Facebook    and  Flickr    •  Turned  focus  to  using  Meetup.com  •  Other  channels  were  causing  problems:   •     Wanted  on-­‐site  engagement       •   Li)le  communica-on  among  audience   •     People  were  not  responding  online   •   High  administra-ve  overhead   Why it’s the best: Tone   •  Prac-cal,  behind  the  scenes,  unapologe-c   Touchability   •  Had  goals  to  be  “touchable/relatable”  in  different  ways   •  Found  an  online  playorm  that  worked   Transparency   •  Assessed  playorms  and  shared  findings   •  Help  move  industry  forward  while  keeping  audiences  in  the  loop   Timeliness   •  Shared  informa-on  as  it  happened  
  • 23. Showing off pride & personalityWinner: Museums Betting Artwork on theSuper Bowl (originally by Indianapolis Museum of Art and the New Orleans Museum of Art)
  • 24. The play-by-playThe Basics:•  Indianapolis  Museum  of  Art  (Max  Anderson)  and  the  New  Orleans  Museum  of  Art   (John  Bullard)  made  public  bets  on  who  would  win  2010  Super  Bowl    •  Bet  famous  works  of  art  from  collec-ons    •  New  Orleans  won,  IMA  lent  Turner’s  FiIh  Plague  of  Egypt  for  three  months  •  Milwaukee  Art  Museum  and  Carnegie  Museum  of  Art  wagered  a  Renoir   (Carnegie)  and  a  Caillebo)e  (Milwaukee)  in  2011  Super  Bowl   Why it’s the best:   Tone   •  Directors  are  the  voices.  “Talked  smack”   •  Art  museums  have  a  sense  of  fun,  risk  and  adventure     Touchability   •  The  bet  mixes  unexpected  popular  cultures/interests     •  Align  value/pride  with  community   Transparency   •  Began  with  open  communica-ons  for  all  to  see   Timeliness   •  In  -me  for  Super  Bowl  
  • 25. B est   Use of online evangelists   Winner: California Academy of Science’s NightLife Insiders
  • 26. The Play-by-playThe Basics:•  California  Academy  of  Sciences  recruited  six  NightLife  Insiders  for  weekly  program  •  Insiders  selected  by  based  on  originality,  humor,  quality  of  wri)en  essay,  and   ac-vity  in  social  media  •  Insiders  trade  “insider  experiences”  for  posi-ve  word  of  mouth  and  social  media   Why it’s the best: Tone     •  Use  voice  of  “creators”  and  “cri-cs”  for  amplifica-on  and  credibility   •  NightLife  Insiders  have  different  voices,  maximize  reach   Touchability   •  Known  online  personali-es  help  make  accessible   •  Provide  insiders  with  relevant  experiences   •  Organic,  promo-onal  content   Transparency   •  Outlined  ini-a-ve,  applica-on  and  “payment”   Timeliness   •  Three-­‐month  -me  period   •  Prep  for  each  NightLife  event  
  • 27. Have  ques-ons,  ideas,  or  resources?   Please  contact  me!    cdilenschneider@   Know  Your  Own  Bone  impactsresearch.com   colleendilen.com   @cdilly   linkedin.com/in/   twi)er.com/cdilly   colleendilenschneider   facebook.com/colleendilen   pinterest.com/colleendilen