Oh, The Places You Will Go!

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Oh, The Places You Will Go!

  1. 1. Suggestions for Hybrid Class Group Projects -Valerie Ooka Pang and Andrea Saltzman-Martin Wikis-Wikis are excellent avenues for students to take a great deal of information on a specific topic and organize the data. In education, pre-service students develop a unit and gather background knowledge on the set of lessons. In this way another teacher would have all the information needed in order to teach the concept/issue/theme. What is most important is to help students (preservice-teachers) stay on task and continue to be organized. Often times they wait to the last minute and this does not work well with in depth group projects, therefore the following reports build upon each other. The following is only a sample used in a class where preservice teachers are asked to create a culturally relevant teaching unit. For other classes, the format will differ. Wiki Group Format Report 1-Due Week 3 Name of Group and Group Members Introduction Grade Level of the Wiki Subject Areas Group Member Roles and Responsibilities Identified Culturally Relevant Content- What student knowledge are you building on in your unit? Instructional Objectives of the Wiki (Instructional objectives should read something like "At the conclusion of the unit, the student will be able to -then use active words such as define, draw, write, explain, describe, etc. and give the info the student should be able to provide."--this way the teacher knows exactly what she/he is teaching and student assessment ties in carefully with instructional objectives. An example would be-"At the conclusion of this lesson on prejudice reduction, the student will be able to define a stereotype as an overgeneralization based on a category used to treat others unfairly and can also be explained as an untrue picture of another.") Standards To Be Addressed-Identify source of standards, subject area ******************************************************** Wiki Group Format Report 2--Due Week 5 Report 2 includes all info from Report 1, and the additional information below: Culturally Relevant Instructional Strategies- How will you teach the content to students? How will you scaffold? Chunk information? Provide feedback? Example Lessons: Identify or develop exceptional lessons ******************************************************** Wiki Group Format Report 3 includes all information from Reports 1 and 2, and the additional info below: Due Week 7 Conclusion (What did the group find out researching their topic/issue that would help other teachers in developing their units?) References-Cite sources 1
  2. 2. Suggestions for Hybrid Class Group Projects -Valerie Ooka Pang and Andrea Saltzman-Martin Resources-References that can be used to extend your unit. Rubric-How will you assess students? Group Presentations are then due in the face-to-face class Week 9. The use of a jigsaw strategy is helpful in the completion of a group project, therefore after your group has decided on what area you want to focus your wiki/website on, here are the various roles that members of the group can take on: Group Manager: Ensures that everyone in the group knows their role and sets deadlines for project components to be finished. Writer: Understands the entire project and writes the introduction and conclusion to tie all the elements together of the wiki. Resource Manager: Collects all of the references from each member and creates the reference section. (Written material list such as articles and books and websites) Editor: Reviews all contributions for spelling and grammar and also places all of the photos, texts, and references into the Wiki. Digital Consultant Brings in interesting graphics, presentation abilities, special digital knowledge Group Member: Each member identifies sections of the Wiki to contribute. ************************************************************************************** Public Service Announcements- PSA PSAs are another excellent way for preservice teachers and other students to identify a specific message that they would like to convey to others. The most difficult aspect of the PSA can be the development of the opening and ending statements, however these statements are critical to the organization and effectiveness of the PSA. These projects can be created using the software programs, imovie and Movie Maker. PSA (Information taken from http://www.pbs.org/pov/pov2008/election/pdf/pov_whyvote_lesson.pdf) Guidelines for your PSA An effective PSA is: • 30 seconds long or less • grabs the viewers' attention • makes one point concisely • proposes a specific action to the audience • gives contact information • gives accurate facts A PSA contains a combination of visual and audio elements (not necessarily all): • an on-camera narration or voice over • live action, animation, or still images 2
  3. 3. Suggestions for Hybrid Class Group Projects -Valerie Ooka Pang and Andrea Saltzman-Martin • text • music Key points to remember about the writing: (from The Community Tool Box)- http://ctb.ku.edu/en/ • Because you've only got a few seconds to reach your audience (often 30 seconds or less), the language should be simple and vivid. Take your time and make every word count. Make your message crystal clear. • The content of the writing should have the right "hooks" -- words or phrases that grab attention -- to attract your audience (again, you need to know who your audience is). For example, starting your PSA off with something like, "If you're between the ages of 25 and 44, you're more likely to die from AIDS than from any other disease." • The PSA should usually (though maybe not 100% of the time) request a specific action, such as calling a specific number to get more information. You ordinarily want listeners to do something as a result of having heard the PSA. Getting ready to write your PSA: 1. Choose points to focus on. Don't overload the viewer or listener with too many different messages. List all the possible messages you'd like to get into the public mind, and then decide on the one or two most vital points. For example, if your group educates people about asthma, you might narrow it down to a simple focus point like, "If you have asthma, you shouldn't smoke." 2. Brainstorm. This is also a good time to look at the PSA's that others have done for ideas. Get together with your colleagues to toss around ideas about ways you can illustrate the main point(s) you've chosen. If possible, include members of your target group in this process. If you're aiming your PSA at African-American youth, for example, be sure to invite some African- American youth to take part in brainstorming. 3. Check your facts. It's extremely important for your PSA to be accurate. Any facts should be checked and verified before sending the PSA in. Is the information up to date? If there are any demonstrations included in the PSA, are they done clearly and correctly? ****************************************************** Format for PSA Reports-Developed by Valerie Ooka Pang and Andrea Saltzman-Martin PSA Group Report 1- Only one member needs to upload. Name of Group and Group Members Title of Video/Powerpoint/PSA Project Introduction Grade Level Target 3
  4. 4. Suggestions for Hybrid Class Group Projects -Valerie Ooka Pang and Andrea Saltzman-Martin Subject Areas-(Can Be Used In) Purpose of the Project- Message to be Conveyed-Introductory Statement and Concluding Statements. These statements should be powerful enough to get students thinking about the message. The concluding statement should summarize your message in a concise and clear manner. Instructional Objectives (Instructional objectives should read something like "At the conclusion of the video, the student will be able to -then use active words such as define, write, explain, describe, etc. and give the info the student should be able to provide."--this way the teacher knows exactly what she/he is teaching and student assessment ties in carefully with instructional objectives. An example would be-"At the conclusion of this lesson prejudice reduction, the student will be able to define a stereotype as an overgeneralization based on a category used to treat others unfairly and can also be explained as an untrue picture of another.") ************** PSA Report 2 Report 2 will include all of the above and How will the message Be "Chunked" (given in building blocks) in your project?-Logical progression of thought in small "chunks." Provide script for the project- ****************** PSA Report 3 Report 3 will include reports 1 and 2 and Provide Assessment-How will your group assess the students' knowledge after viewing the project? Rubric for Assessment that can be given to students so they will know how they will be evaluated. References- Citations Resources-Additional resources that teachers can use in the creation of their PSAs. Everyone should have carefully identified roles. Here are suggestions: Group Manager: Ensures that everyone in the group knows their role and sets deadlines for project components to be finished. Writer: Understands the entire project and writes the introduction and conclusion to tie all the elements together of the PSA. Resource Manager: Collects all of the references from each member and creates the reference section. (List all references used such as articles, books, personal consultants, and websites) Editor: Reviews all contributions for spelling and grammar and also places all of the photos, texts, and references into the PSA; can create the PSA after all members provide each aspect. Digital Consultant Brings in interesting graphics, videos, presentation abilities, special digital knowledge 4

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