Chapter 12 notes
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Transcript

  • 1. Early Societies in West Africa
  • 2. Early Societies in West Africa
  • 3. 12.2 Geography & Trade
  • 4. SarahDesert
  • 5. SarahDesert
  • 6. Sahel
  • 7. Sahel
  • 8. Sahelshort grasses, small trees,small brush grows in the sahel.
  • 9. Savanna
  • 10. Savanna
  • 11. Savannatall grasses, trees and grains grow in the savanna
  • 12. Forest
  • 13. Forest
  • 14. Forest Trees, shrubs, oil palms,yams, kola trees, mahogany,teak trees grow in the West African forests.
  • 15. 2. How did geography affect trade in West Africa?
  • 16. 2. How did geography affect trade in West Africa? • 2. Different types of food grow in different zones. People had to trade to get things they could not produce themselves.
  • 17. 12.3 Communities & Villages
  • 18. 2. What are some reasons that family-based communities joined together to form villages?
  • 19. 2. What are some reasons that family-based communities joined together to form villages? • Extended families formed villages to control flooding, to mine for iron or gold, or for protection.
  • 20. 3. Who made decisions in a family-based community?
  • 21. 3. Who made decisions in a family-based community? • One of the male elders probably made decisions for the community.
  • 22. 12.4 Development of Towns & Cities
  • 23. 2. How did the ability to work with iron affect foodproductions and the types of jobs that villagers performed in West Africa?
  • 24. 2. How did the ability to work with iron affect foodproductions and the types of jobs that villagers performed in West Africa? • With iron tools, farmers cleared land and grew crops more efficiently. Abundant food supported larger villages where more people were free to take up other jobs such as weaving, metal-working, and pottery.
  • 25. 3. How did the location along trade routes affect development of cities?
  • 26. 3. How did the location along trade routes affect development of cities? • Villages located along rivers or other trade routes became trading sites. By taxing traders, villages became wealthy. Wealth led to an increase in population, and villages often grew into towns and cities.
  • 27. 4. How did the location of Jenne-jeno lead to its becoming a large, busy city?
  • 28. 4. How did the location of Jenne-jeno lead to its becoming a large, busy city? • Jenne-jeno was located at the intersection of the Niger and Bani Rivers. This ideal location for farming, fishing, and trade allowed it to become a large city.
  • 29. 12.5 The Rise ofKingdoms & Empires
  • 30. 2. How were trading cities able to develop into kingdoms?
  • 31. 2. How were trading cities able to develop into kingdoms? • Rulers of some trading cities taxed goods that were bought and sold in their cities. They used this wealth to raise large armies that conquered nearby trading areas.
  • 32. 3. List one advantage and onedisadvantage of being a part of a kingdom?
  • 33. 3. List one advantage and onedisadvantage of being a part of a kingdom? • Advantages: Armies made sure trade routes were safe. They kept out foreign armies and raiders. Wars between small cities ended. • Disadvantages: People living in conquered areas had to pay tribute, and the men had to serve in the army.