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2008 Updates & Changes Presentation

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  • 1. Title-24 Building Energy Standards Energy Code Works, Inc. Mark Madison CEPE, CEA, AEE, HERS Rater, GreenPoint Rater, ResNet Rater, Member CABEC, CHEERS
  • 2. Scope of this Class 1 Changes to Envelope Requirements 2 Changes to HVAC Requirements 3 New Residential Lighting Requirements 4 Impact of Time Dependant Valuation (TDV) www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 3. Scope of this Class 5 New Ventilation Requirements 6 New HERS Credits 7 New Forms & Registration Requirements 8 Q&A www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 4. 2008 Building Energy Standards Effective date: January 1, 2010  Some cities and counties can accept 2008 Title-24 compliance calculations prior to January 1, 2010. Most won’t  Benefits of using 2008 Standards now (tract projects)  Current projects that might slip past January1 date should be analyzed using 2008 Standards to avoid surprises later. www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 5. 2008 Building Energy Standards Effective date: January 1, 2010 www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 6. 2008 Building Energy Standards Brief History of Title-24  1976 California Energy Commission created  1977 Warren-Alquist Act  “The standards shall be cost effective”  “C.E.C. shall periodically update the standards and adopt revisions when deemed necessary” Al Alquist www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 7. 2008 Building Energy Standards Brief History of Title-24  1978 Standards  1980 Standards  1982 Standards  1984 Standards  1986 Standards  1987 Standards  1988 Standards  1992 Standards  1995 Standards  1998 Standards  2001 Standards  2005 Standards www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 8. 2008 Building Energy Standards Brief History of Title-24  1st edition of Title-24 Building Energy Standards July 26, 1978, 114 pages www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 9. 2008 Building Energy Standards Brief History of Title-24  1978 Prescriptive Requirements www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 10. 2008 Building Energy Standards Brief History of Title-24  Current 2005 Prescriptive Requirements www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 11. 2008 Building Energy Standards Brief History of Title-24  Result of 30 years of Title-24 Standards: www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 12. 2008 Building Energy Standards Brief History of Title-24  2008 Title-24 Energy Standards  Standards : 166 pages  Residential Manual: 522 pages  Non-Res Manual: 901 pages  Appendixes: 352 pages  Appliance Efficiency Regs: 238 pages  Title-24 ACM Manual: 212 pages  HERS Manual: 106 pages  HERS Regulations: 24 pages  Total: 2521 pages www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 13. 2008 Building Energy Standards Brief History of Title-24  1978 thru 1998 Title-24 fairly low priority concern in plancheck process  2001 Standards changed all that  Tighter code/HERS Measures/City Requirements have made Title-24 a priority best addressed early in design stage  Utility Incentive Programs also use Title-24 as yardstick to qualify submittals into their programs.  2008 bottom line:  Title-24 needs to be incorporated early into the building design process  Title-24 is not over when permit is issued  All in design team need to be well versed in Title-24 requirements, HERS measures, forms and inspections, coordination is critical. www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 14. 2008 Building Energy Standards Brief History of Title-24  Compliance forms have grown exponentially  1978, 2 pages  2008 CF-1R, MF-1R, CF-6R total 68 pages!  Minimum of 8 and up to 24 pages on the drawings www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 15. 2008 Building Energy Standards www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 16. 2008 Building Energy Standards  Future of Title-24 www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 17. 2008 Building Energy Standards  Future of Title-24 www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 18. 2008 Building Energy Standards  Future of Title-24 www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 19. 2008 Building Energy Standards  Future of Title-24 www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 20. Scope of this Class 1 Changes to Envelope Requirements 2 Changes to HVAC Requirements 3 New Residential Lighting Requirements 4 Impact of Time Dependant Valuation (TDV) www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 21. Compliance Paths Two compliance paths available Prescriptive Performance www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 22. Compliance Paths Two compliance paths available Mandatory Measures Prescriptive Performance Prescriptive Performance Path Path www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 23. Compliance Paths Advantages/Disadvantages Prescriptive Performance Path Path Advantages Advantages Simple Flexibility Easier to use Trade-offs galore Easier to plancheck Can model wide variety of energy saving features Disadvantages and strategies Lack of flexibility Output available for plancheck and other incentive Ignores many energy saving strategies programs No trade-offs Disadvantages Cannot use for incentive programs that Software expense Prescriptive require performance based reports Performance use or learn Not easy to Larger report/forms More difficult to plancheck www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 24. Building Envelope Walls, floors, ceiling assemblies Windows, glass doors, skylights When required, testing and certification, & labeling requirements, where required. www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 25. Building Envelope Current 2005 Prescriptive Requirements www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 26. Building Envelope New 2008 Prescriptive Requirements www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 27. Building Envelope New 2008 Prescriptive Requirements Must use envelope assemblies from tables in Residential Appendix to quantify R-value/U-factor for assemblies www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 28. Building Envelope New 2008 Prescriptive Requirements www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 29. Building Envelope New 2008 Prescriptive Requirements www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 30. Building Envelope New 2008 Prescriptive Requirements Change from wood framing to metal framing can significantly affect compliance. Wood and metal framing not interchangeable Metal framed construction generally will require a exterior rigid insulating board www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 31. Building Envelope New 2008 Prescriptive Requirements www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 32. Building Envelope New 2008 Prescriptive Requirements Bottom Line: Prescriptive insulation levels remain essentially unchanged from 2005 standards Big change…..Fenestration requirements www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 33. Building Envelope Current 2005 Prescriptive Requirements www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 34. Building Envelope New 2008 Prescriptive Requirements www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 35. Building Envelope Windows, glass doors, skylights Two allowable methods for determining window & door performance: NFRC procedures/labels or… Use default tables (116-a & 116-b) www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 36. Building Envelope NFRC tested w/labels www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 37. Building Envelope www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 38. Building Envelope www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 39. Building Envelope Windows, glass doors, skylights www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 40. Building Envelope Default tables approach Default tables 116-a & 116-b www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 41. Building Envelope Windows, glass doors, skylights 2008 Package D www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 42. Building Envelope Windows, glass doors, skylights Package D vs. Default tables (U-factor) www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 43. Building Envelope Windows, glass doors, skylights Package D vs. Default tables (SHGC) www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 44. Building Envelope Windows, glass doors, skylights Package D vs. NFRC labels www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 45. Building Envelope Windows, glass doors, skylights 0.40 U-factor/0.40 SGHC vs. available products www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 46. Building Envelope Windows, glass doors, skylights 0.40 U-factor/0.40 SGHC vs. available products www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 47. Building Envelope Windows, glass doors, skylights 0.40 U-factor/0.40 SGHC vs. available products www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 48. Building Envelope Windows, glass doors, skylights 0.40 U-factor/0.40 SGHC vs. available products www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 49. Building Envelope Windows, glass doors, skylights 0.40 U-factor/0.40 SGHC vs. Energy Star requirements www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 50. Building Envelope Windows, glass doors, skylights Bottom Line: Prescriptive U-factor requirements almost 30% more stringent than 2005 code 2008 Standards will force you to use NFRC Labels Significant penalty for using default tables Relatively easy to hit 0.40 UF/SHGC target Energy Star target of 0.30 UF/SHGC is driving window manufactures product more than California’s Title-24 www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 51. Building Envelope When required, where required, testing, certification & labeling In 2008 code required prescriptively in all climate zones New, addition & alterations www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 52. Building Envelope When required, where required, testing, certification & labeling Energy Star Cool Roof does not qualify in California Must be certified & labeled by the Cool Roof Rating Council Roof tear-offs will trigger cool roof requirement, however…. www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 53. Building Envelope When required, where required, testing, certification & labeling Tradeoffs to avoid cool roof requirement: 1. Buildings with no ducts in attic or, 2. Radiant barrier in the attic or, 3. R-30 attic insulation; or, 4. If in Climate zones 10, 11, 13, and 14 R-3 or greater roof deck insulation or, 5. Existing ducts insulation, sealed and HERS duct tested or, 6. Use performance approach and utilize trade-offs and… www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 54. Building Envelope When required, where required, testing, certification & labeling Exemptions to cool roof requirement: Roof areas covered by building integrated photovoltaic panels and solar hot water panels and roofs with existing roof ballasts w/weight of 25 lb/ft2 are exempted from cool roof requirement. www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 55. Scope of this Class 1 Changes to Envelope Requirements 2 Changes to HVAC Requirements 3 New Residential Lighting Requirements 4 Impact of Time Dependant Valuation (TDV) www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 56. HVAC Minimum AFUE, SEER, EER SEER vs EER Prescriptive requirement No prescriptive alternatives HVAC change-outs Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fat Watt Draw www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 57. HVAC Appliance Efficiency Regulations set HVAC efficiency minimums in Prescriptive Packages www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 58. HVAC Prescriptive Packages refer to Appliance Efficiency Regulations minimums www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 59. HVAC Minimum AFUE, SEER, EER SEER vs EER www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 60. HVAC Minimum AFUE, SEER, EER SEER vs EER Questions: What is the difference between EER and SEER? Why does it matter? www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 61. HVAC Minimum AFUE, SEER, EER SEER vs EER EER is measured at 80 degrees indoor air running continuously SEER is measured by using the EER and factoring in the same unit running under a lighter load (80 degrees indoor, 82 degrees outdoor and cycling on and off www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 62. HVAC Minimum AFUE, SEER, EER SEER vs EER Why this matters: Possible for two units with the same SEER to have different EERs For two units with a given SEER the one with the higher EER will be more efficient EER’s higher than 10 require HERS verification Take time to verify SEER and EER www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 63. HVAC Minimum AFUE, SEER, EER SEER vs EER Why this matters: EER higher than 10 will trigger a HERS credit in the Title-24 compliance calculations Will also appear on the CF-1R as a HERS measure required verification and a CF-4R www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 64. HVAC Minimum AFUE, SEER, EER SEER vs EER Bottom Line: Minimum efficiency levels remain essentially unchanged from 2005 standards. EER more important Big change…..Duct testing, Refrigerant Charge Measurement, Cooling coil airflow & Fan Watt Draw www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 65. HVAC Prescriptive requirement No prescriptive alternatives HVAC change-outs www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 66. HVAC Prescriptive requirement No prescriptive alternatives HVAC change-outs TXV verification or higher EER alternatives no longer options to avoid duct sealing & testing Performance approach is an option to tradeoff against duct sealing & testing www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 67. HVAC Prescriptive requirement No prescriptive alternatives HVAC change-outs HVAC change-outs Ducts must be sealed and tested under any of the following circumstances: www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 68. HVAC Prescriptive requirement No prescriptive alternatives HVAC change-outs HVAC change-outs 1. Air handler installed or replaced 2. Outdoor condensing unit installed or replaced 3. Cooling or heating coil installed or replaced 4. Furnace heat exchanger installed or replaced 5. When existing duct systems are altered in climate zones 2, 9, 10, 11, 12-16 www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 69. HVAC Heating Cooling HVAC Equipment Sizing Heating The Standards do not set limits on the sizing of heating equipment, but they do require that heating loads be calculated for new heating systems Acceptable load calculation procedures include methods described in the ASHRAE Handbook – Equipment, ASHRAE Handbook – Applications, ASHRAE Handbook – Fundamentals, SMACNA Residential Comfort System Installation Manual, or ACCA Manual J.” www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 70. HVAC Heating Cooling HVAC Equipment Sizing Cooling “Just as for heating equipment, the Standards do not set limits on the size of cooling equipment, but they do require that cooling loads be calculated for new cooling systems. Avoiding over sizing is especially important for cooling equipment because efficiency degrades when the system cycles on and off frequently. The Standards offer a compliance credit when the installed air conditioning equipment is sized in accordance with the Reference Residential Appendix RA1 Maximum Rated Cooling Capacity for compliance credit sizing calculations. A HERS rater field verification is required to confirm that the installed equipment conforms to the sizing criteria as reported on the CF-1R.” www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 71. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw Prescriptive Package Requirements Refrigerant charge Measurement Climate zones 2 and 8-15 (split systems only) Cooling Coil Airflow (greater than 350 cfm per ton) Climate zones 10-15 Fan Watt Draw (less than 0.58 watt per cfm) Climate zones 10-15 www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 72. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw Prescriptive Package Requirements Refrigerant charge Measurement Climate zones 2 and 8-15 (split systems only) Cooling Coil Airflow (greater than 350 cfm per ton) Climate zones 10-15 Fan Watt Draw (less than 0.58 watt per cfm) Climate zones 10-15 www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 73. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 74. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw Three acceptable methods for proper refrigerant charge: 1. Super-heat 2. Sub-cooling 3. Weighing of refrigerant www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 75. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw Three acceptable methods for proper refrigerant charge: 1. Super-heat Uses temperature differences in evaporator section to determine proper charge www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 76. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw Three acceptable methods for proper refrigerant charge: 2. Sub-cooling Similar to superheat but happens in condensing portion of system. www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 77. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw Three acceptable methods for proper refrigerant charge: 3. Weighing of refrigerant Using manufacturers recommendation on unit (6lbs 5oz etc) www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 78. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw Un-acceptable methods for proper refrigerant charge: 4. Instinct, pressures, experience, beer can cold method www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 79. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw All three methods acceptable but must be verified by HERS rater 1. Invasive method (Gauges) 2. Non-invasive method (superheat/subcool) www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 80. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw Temperature Measurement Access Holes (TMAH) Package C & D require HERS verification of proper refrigerant charge HVAC installer must provide TMAH www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 81. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 82. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw Two permanently installed temperature sensors, one mounted on evap coil and one mounted on condenser coil. Must be type K with plug leading to outside of equipment accessible to HERS raters without any disassembly www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 83. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw Two permanently installed temperature sensors, one mounted on evap coil and one mounted on condenser coil. Must be type K with plug leading to outside of equipment accessible to HERS raters without any disassembly www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 84. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw HVAC contractor must provide pressure and temperature access holes of specific size in specific locations and label these holes. This mandatory for HERS rater to later verify RCM, CCA and Fan Watt Draw www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 85. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw Cooling Coil Air Flow and Fan Watt Draw hole for Static Pressure Probe www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 86. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 87. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw 2008 Appendix RA-3 page 3-11 www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 88. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw HVAC Change-outs Climate zones 2 and 8-15 new or replacement split a/c units or heat pumps RCM required with HERS verification Applies also when components of existing HVAC system such as outdoor condensing unit or indoor coil are replaced www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 89. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw HVAC Change-outs Climate zones 10-15 when new or replacement space conditioning system is installed CCA and FWD required with HERS verification This is a prescriptive requirement, can be traded-off using performance approach www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 90. HVAC Refrigerant Charge Measurement Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw Bottom line Will require good coordination with HERS rater for all three HERS HVAC measures. Choice: Invasive (gauges) or non-invasive. HVAC contractors will need to become familiar with testing procedure for all three HERS measures. CF-6R HVAC forms will need to be filled out prior to HERS verification tests Will need system in place for providing sensors, temperature and pressure access holes w/labels for HERS raters www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 91. Scope of this Class 1 Changes to Envelope Requirements 2 Changes to HVAC Requirements 3 New Residential Lighting Requirements 4 Impact of Time Dependant Valuation (TDV) www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 92. Residential Lighting 50% Rule High Efficacy New allowances #1 Bathrooms, Garages, Laundry rooms, closets & utility rooms #2 Other Rooms Minimum efficacy Required controls www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 93. Residential Lighting 50% Rule High Efficacy New allowances 50% rule remains No limit to kitchen lighting watts However 50% of total installed lighting watts must be high efficacy High efficacy fixtures switched separately from incandescent or low efficacy fixtures www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 94. Residential Lighting 50% Rule High Efficacy New allowances www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 95. Residential Lighting 50% Rule High Efficacy New allowances What is high efficacy? Table 150-C provides definition www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 96. Residential Lighting 50% Rule High Efficacy New allowances What is high efficacy? Table 6-2 for LED efficacy LED fixtures must be C.E.C. Certified Not all LED fixtures are high efficacy www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 97. Residential Lighting 50% Rule High Efficacy New allowances New rules Blank electrical boxes calculated as 180 watts low efficacy Assumed wattage for recessed lumenaires www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 98. Residential Lighting 50% Rule High Efficacy New allowances New rules New wattage assumptions for CF or HID fixture that can accommodate a variety of lumenaires For example 26w, 32w & 42 watt fixture 26w + 32w + 42w = 100w divided by 3 = 33.33w Then use wattage of lumenaire initially installed www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 99. Residential Lighting 50% Rule High Efficacy New allowances New allowances 1. Additional low efficacy wattage allowance Only available after 50% efficacy rule met 2. Kitchen has manual on vacancy sensors or dimmers 3. High efficacy lumenaires and vacancy sensors in garages, laundry rooms, closets and utility rooms www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 100. Residential Lighting 50% Rule High Efficacy New allowances New allowances Internal cabinet lighting allowance 20 watts per linear foot of illuminated cabinet Must be interior to cabinet and illuminated the inside of cabinet www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 101. Residential Lighting 50% Rule High Efficacy New allowances Kitchen Lighting Documentation No more WS-5R (1 page) New form: CF-6R-LTG-01 (3 pages) Includes other rooms, outdoor lighting www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 102. Residential Lighting 50% Rule High Efficacy New allowances www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 103. Residential Lighting New form: CF-4R-LTG-1 Not submitted at plan-check www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 104. Residential Lighting CF-4R-LTG-1 For 2008 not submitted at plan check Now a construction document www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 105. Residential Lighting 2005 Standards WS-5R is currently submitted at plan check www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 106. Residential Lighting #1 Bathrooms, Garages, Laundry rooms, closets & utility rooms #2 Other Rooms Bathrooms, Garages, Laundry Rooms, closets (less than 70 sq. ft.) & utility rooms Rules unchanged for 2008 Fixtures must either be: High efficacy or, Controlled by a vacancy sensor An occupancy sensor does not necessarily qualify as a vacancy sensor Must be manual on, auto-off www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 107. Residential Lighting #1 Bathrooms, Garages, Laundry rooms, closets & utility rooms #2 Other Rooms Attics Regardless of square footage attics are considered “other spaces” High efficacy fixture with regular switch or… Incandescent with dimmer or vacancy sensor www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 108. Residential Lighting #1 Bathrooms, Garages, Laundry rooms, closets & utility rooms #2 Other Rooms Enclosed Patio (unconditioned) Also considered “other space” High efficacy fixture with regular switch or… Incandescent with dimmer or vacancy sensor www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 109. Residential Lighting Minimum efficacy Required controls Permanently mounted to the building Rules slightly changed for 2008 Fixtures must either be: High efficacy or controlled by one of the following: www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 110. Residential Lighting Minimum efficacy Required controls www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 111. Residential Lighting Minimum efficacy Required controls Motion Sensor requirements Auto-on & Auto-off Must include photocell control Must provide regular switch for manual operation Must comply with 30 minute shutoff requirement www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 112. Residential Lighting Minimum efficacy Required controls Exempt outdoor lighting Any fixtures not attached to building Decorative landscape lighting Pool/Spa lighting www.energycode.com www.energycode.com
  • 113. Scope of this Class 1 Changes to Envelope Requirements 2 Changes to HVAC Requirements 3 New Residential Lighting Requirements 4 Impact of Time Dependant Valuation (TDV) www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 114. TDV 4 Impact of Time Dependant Valuation (TDV) New for 2008 Residential Standards Previous versions of Title-24 did not account for time-of-use patterns TDV accounts for variations in cost related to time of day, seasons, geography, fuel type 2008 Standards now places a higher value on energy savings during high cost times Encourages designs that will reduce peak loads thru-out California. www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 115. TDV 4 Impact of Time Dependant Valuation (TDV) Example: Single family residence 1800 sq. ft. Package D parameters www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 116. TDV 4 Impact of Time Dependant Valuation (TDV) Example: SFR residence 1800 sq. ft. Package D www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 117. TDV 4 Impact of Time Dependant Valuation (TDV) Example: SFR residence 1800 sq. ft. Package D 1ST Perf Run Front facing N www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 118. TDV 4 Impact of Time Dependant Valuation (TDV) Example: SFR residence 1800 sq. ft. Package D 2nd Perf Run Multiple Orientations www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 119. TDV 4 Impact of Time Dependant Valuation (TDV) Bottom Line for 2008 Building designs that generate high heating/cooling loads during peak energy cost periods will be severely penalized Electric multipliers for 2008 up to 50 verses 20 in 2005 standards Gas multipliers for 2008 up to 1.5 vs. 1.0 in 2005 standards Upside: Energy saving features, strategies that reduce peak loads are rewarded greatly TDV ignored using prescriptive approach in Residential Standards break www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 120. Title-24 Building Energy Standards Energy Code Works, Inc. Break
  • 121. Scope of this Class 5 New Ventilation Requirements 6 New HERS Credits 7 New Forms & Registration Requirements 8 Q&A www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 122. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2-2007 •Requirements for local ventilation (bathrooms/kitchens) •100 cfm range hoods/50 cfm for bath fan •Why? Windows not being used for ventilation •All low-rise residential buildings required to have whole house ventilation 8 •Window operation not a permissible method •Mandatory measure www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 123. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2-2007 scope: •Kitchens/bathrooms have local exhaust vented to outdoors •Clothes dryer vented to outdoors •Combustion appliances properly vented and air systems designed to prevent backdrafting •MERV 6 filters in HVAC system •Ventilation fans must meet sound requirements 8 Continuously operation: 1.0 sone Intermittent fans: 3.0 sone Additions smaller than 1000 sq. ft. exempt www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 124. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2-2007 What is a sone? 8 www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 125. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2-2007 What is a sone? A Sone is a measurement of sound in terms of comfortable hearing level for an average listener. The lower the sone value, the more comfortable the listening environment. Sones are not decibels or volume, but rather how sound is 8 "sensed". One sone is the equivalent of a quiet refrigerator. First proposed by Stanley Smith Stevens in 1936. www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 126. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2-2007 Three generic solutions to meeting outside air ventilation requirements 1. Exhaust Ventilation 2. Supply Ventilation 3. Combination supply/exhaust 8 www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 127. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2-2007 Exhaust ventilation 8 www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 128. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2-2007 Supply ventilation 8 www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 129. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2-2007 Combination supply/exhaust ventilation 8 www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 130. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2-2007 Ventilation flow rate calculation One cubic foot per minute (cfm) for each 100 sq. ft. of floor area plus 7.5 cfm for each occupant. The number of occupants = the number of bedrooms plus one person: 8 www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 131. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2-2007 Ventilation flow rate calculation One cubic foot per minute (cfm) for each 100 sq. ft. of floor area plus 7.5 cfm for each occupant. The number of occupants = the number of bedrooms plus one person: 8 www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 132. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2-2007 Ventilation flow rate calculation Question: What is the required continuous ventilation rate required for a 3 bedroom, 1,800 sq. ft. townhouse? Formula: One cubic foot per minute (cfm) for each 100 sq. ft. of floor area plus87.5 cfm for each occupant. The number of occupants = the number of bedrooms plus one person: www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 133. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2-2007 Ventilation flow rate calculation Question: What is the required continuous ventilation rate required for a 3 bedroom, 1,800 sq. ft. townhouse? Answer: 48 cfm. 1800/100 = 18 cfm 8 + 3 (bedrooms) + 1 (person) x 7.5 cfm = 30 cfm 30 cfm + 18 cfm = 48 cfm www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 134. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2-2007 Ventilation flow rate calculation Question: How would you satisfy this 48 cfm ventilation requirement? 8 www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 135. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2-2007 Ventilation flow rate calculation Question: How would you satisfy the 48 cfm ventilation requirement? Answer: 50 cfm continuously operating local exhaust in one of the bathrooms This also is the minimum cfm required for the local exhaust portion of ASHRAE 62.2 www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 136. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2-2007 Ventilation flow rate calculation Intermittently operating fans will be required to have a larger cfm airflow to makeup for the fewer hours of fan operation. Required air flow rate can be 10 to 20 times greater when fans operate less than 6 hours per day. 8 www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 137. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2-2007 Intermittent fan flow rate calculation 8 www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 138. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2-2007 Controls and Operation Must have override control readily accessible If intermittent fans are used must use timer 8 www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 139. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2 documentation What does this mean for the designer? Note block Calcs Specs Details on HVAC plans if incorporated into HVAC system CF-6R MECH-5 (at inspection) Who will perform the ventilation calcs? (Title-24 consultant, 8 HVAC designer, architect, etc) www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 140. Ventilation 5 New Ventilation Requirements ASHRAE 62.2 documentation 8 www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 141. Scope of this Class 5 New Ventilation Requirements 6 New HERS Credits 7 New Forms & Registration Requirements 8 Q&A www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 142. HERS Measures Duct Sealing •Sealed and HERS verified less than 6% supply fan flow •Change-outs: 15% or less of fan flow Supply Duct • Conditioned space, buried ducts Location Supply Duct • Reduced surface area. Credits • NEW CEC certified AHU w/less than 2% leakage. Low Leakage Duct sealing & testing also required. AHU •CHANGED Refrigerant charge verified using one of three methods Refrigerant Invasive, non-invasive & CID. No TXV to trade against Charge www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 143. HERS Measures CID • NEW Charge Indicator Device • NEW Requires air handling units maintain supply airflow greater CCA than 350 cfm per nominal ton of cooling capacity across the coil Fan Watt • NEW Requires fan watt draw less than 0.58 watts per cfm Draw • HVAC condenser & coil correctly matched to achieve High EER high EER (above 10) •Credit for A/C equipment having cooling capacity that meets Cooling calculated maximum cooling load. Capacity www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 144. HERS Measures Evap Cooled • NEW Improves EER, water use limits & duct sealing, air flow, and Condensers refrigerant charge verification required. Ice Storage • NEW Shifts peak energy use to off-peak hours (Ice Bear) A/C Additional HERS measures required Envelope • Sealing, caulking, gaskets. Verified by HERS blower door test. Sealing • Framing stage field verification then insulation stage verification. QII • New QII verification for Spray Polyurethane Foam • Not a Title-24 credit, New Solar Home Program requirement Photovoltaic • HERS PV verifications required. www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 145. HERS Measures HERS Measures most commonly specified for 2008: Duct Sealing Refrigerant Charge Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw Photovoltaic QII www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 146. HERS Measures HERS Measures additional benefits •HVAC installation quality control Duct Sealing Most ducts leak better than 25% of supply fan flow (new construction) Refrigerant Charge Most do not understand ramifications of duct leak (supply side & return side leaks) Cooling Coil Airflow •Reduces indoor air pollution •Increased HVAC system efficiency Fan Watt Draw Photovoltaic QII www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 147. HERS Measures Duct Sealing benefits Duct Sealing Refrigerant Charge Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw Photovoltaic QII www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 148. HERS Measures HERS Measures additional benefits •EnergyStar studies verify that over 75% of Duct Sealing installed cooling equipment have improper refrigeration charge Refrigerant Lowers efficiency by 5 to 20% Charge Causes premature failure Cooling Coil Airflow Most do not understand ramifications of duct leak (supply side & return side leaks) Fan Watt •Reduces indoor air pollution Draw Photovoltaic •Increased HVAC system efficiency QII www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 149. HERS Measures HERS Measures additional benefits •CCA credit addresses poorly design duct Duct Sealing system, fewer bends, short, direct runs that maximize airflow •Goal: 350 cfm per ton in cooling mode Refrigerant •Test performed by HVAC contractor Charge •Verified by HERS rater Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw Photovoltaic QII www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 150. HERS Measures HERS Measures additional benefits •Fan Watt Draw also seeks to improve poorly Duct Sealing design duct system, fewer bends, short, direct runs that maximize airflow •Goal: 0.58 watts per cfm of airflow Refrigerant •Test using watt meter performed by installer Charge •Verified by HERS rater Cooling Coil Airflow Fan Watt Draw Photovoltaic QII www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 151. HERS Measures HERS Measures additional benefits •HVAC installation quality control Duct Sealing Fewer than 10% of HVAC systems have permits pulled 30-50% not installed properly Refrigerant Charge •Insulation installation quality control Cooling Coil •Compliance failures have led to an estimated Airflow 20-30% increase in peak energy needed on hot summer afternoons. Fan Watt Draw •Estimated 30% of energy savings potential of energy codes is lost due to non-compliance. Photovoltaic QII •Inadequate understanding of degradation in performance due to poor installation www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 152. Scope of this Class 5 New Ventilation Requirements 6 New HERS Credits 7 New Forms & Registration Requirements 8 Q&A www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 153. Compliance Forms Prescriptive Performance Installation CF-1R New CF-1R Performance CF-6R Installation CF-1R Addition MF-1R Certificate CF-1R Alteration CF-SR CF-4R Field MF-1R Verification/HERS CF-SR Solar Hot Water WS-1R Thermal Mass WS-2R Weighted Average WS-3R SHGC www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 154. Compliance Forms Prescriptive CF-1R New CF-1R Addition CF-1R Alteration MF-1R CF-SR Solar Hot Water WS-1R Thermal Mass WS-2R Weighted Average WS-3R SHGC www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 155. Compliance Forms Prescriptive CF-1R New CF-1R Addition CF-1R Alteration MF-1R CF-SR Solar Hot Water WS-1R Thermal Mass WS-2R Weighted Average WS-3R SHGC www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 156. Compliance Forms Prescriptive CF-1R New CF-1R Addition CF-1R Alteration MF-1R CF-SR Solar Hot Water WS-1R Thermal Mass WS-2R Weighted Average WS-3R SHGC www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 157. Compliance Forms Prescriptive CF-1R New CF-1R Addition CF-1R Alteration MF-1R CF-SR Solar Hot Water WS-1R Thermal Mass WS-2R Weighted Average WS-3R SHGC www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 158. Compliance Forms Prescriptive CF-1R New CF-1R Addition CF-1R Alteration MF-1R CF-SR Solar Hot Water WS-1R Thermal Mass WS-2R Weighted Average WS-3R SHGC Roles & Responsibilities Documentation Author Signature certifies documentation is accurate & complete Not responsible specification of the building design features www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 159. Compliance Forms Prescriptive CF-1R New CF-1R Addition CF-1R Alteration MF-1R CF-SR Solar Hot Water WS-1R Thermal Mass WS-2R Weighted Average WS-3R SHGC Roles & Responsibilities Designer Responsible for overall building design Responsible for specifications on CF-1R Subject to California Business & Professions Code www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 160. Compliance Forms Prescriptive CF-1R New CF-1R Addition NEW CF-1R Alteration NEW MF-1R CF-SR Solar Hot Water WS-1R Thermal Mass WS-2R Weighted Average WS-3R SHGC www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 161. Compliance Forms Prescriptive CF-1R New CF-1R Addition NEW CF-1R Alteration NEW MF-1R CF-SR Solar Hot Water WS-1R Thermal Mass WS-2R Weighted Average WS-3R SHGC www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 162. Compliance Forms 2005 MF-1R 2 pages Check boxes Prescriptive CF-1R New CF-1R Addition NEW CF-1R Alteration NEW MF-1R CF-SR Solar Hot Water WS-1R Thermal Mass WS-2R Weighted Average WS-3R SHGC www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 163. Compliance Forms 2008 MF-1R 3 pages Prescriptive CF-1R New CF-1R Addition NEW CF-1R Alteration NEW MF-1R CF-SR Solar Hot Water WS-1R Thermal Mass WS-2R Weighted Average WS-3R SHGC www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 164. Compliance Forms 2008 MF-1R Prescriptive CF-1R New CF-1R Addition NEW CF-1R Alteration NEW Mandatory measures on MF-1R form will MF-1R constitute minimum component CF-SR Solar Hot Water WS-1R Thermal Mass performance specifications even if not WS-2R Weighted called out elsewhere on plans Average WS-3R SHGC Other measures on CF-1R may supersede minimum measures on MF-1R form www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 165. Compliance Forms Prescriptive CF-1R New CF-1R Addition NEW CF-1R Alteration NEW MF-1R CF-SR Solar Hot Water WS-1R Thermal Mass WS-2R Weighted Average WS-3R SHGC www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 166. Compliance Forms 5 pages instead of 3 Performance CF-1R Performance MF-1R CF-SR www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 167. Compliance Forms Part 2 should be filled out Performance CF-1R Performance MF-1R CF-SR www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 168. Compliance Forms Performance CF-1R Performance MF-1R CF-SR Electronic signatures will be common and unavoidable with registration www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 169. Compliance Forms CF-6R Installation forms Installation Reworked significantly CF-6R Installation Now include measures previously on MF-1R Certificate and other forms (WS-5R) CF-4R Field Verification/HERS Separated into Envelope, Lighting & HVAC www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 170. Compliance Forms CF-6R Installation forms Installation Purpose of CF-6R forms? CF-6R Installation “To verify that the contractor is aware of the Certificate requirements of the building energy standards CF-4R Field Verification/HERS and they have followed the CEC approved procedures for installation” www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 171. Compliance Forms CF-6R Installation forms Installation Who fills out CF-6R forms? CF-6R Installation General contractor or; Certificate Specialty subcontractors CF-4R Field Verification/HERS When are they submitted? Not at plan check www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 172. Compliance Forms CF-6R Installation forms Completed and signed CF-6Rs must be posted at building site for review by Installation inspectors. Required for final inspection CF-6R Installation Certificate Some CF-6R always require HERS CF-4R Field verification Verification/HERS Some do not HERS rater will need the completed CF-6R forms before they can fill out their CF-4R forms. When registration is required CF-6R’s must be available www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 173. Compliance Forms Installation CF-6R Installation Certificate CF-4R Field Verification/HERS www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 174. Compliance Forms CF-6R example Installation CF-6R Installation Certificate CF-4R Field Verification/HERS www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 175. Compliance Forms CF-6R example Installation CF-6R Installation Certificate CF-4R Field Verification/HERS www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 176. Compliance Forms CF-6R example Contractor responsible for repairs necessary to pass HERS verification tests Installation CF-6R Installation Certificate CF-4R Field Verification/HERS www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 177. Compliance Forms CF-6R Installation forms Also… They are legally binding document Installation CF-6R Installation Certificate CF-4R Field Verification/HERS www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 178. Compliance Forms CF-6R bottom line: CF-6R forms a major part of Title-24 compliance now. The real “teeth” in the new code. Contractors need to be familiar with CF-6R forms and have Installation information gathered to fill out form. CF-6R Installation Also will need to review CF-1R during bid process to Certificate determine if any HERS measures will affect their work CF-4R Field Verification/HERS Will require coordination between Designer, Title-24 consultant and HERS raters CF-6R forms filled out by hand will be unwieldy because of requirements to file electronically Will need a system to provide documentation package to inspector, HERS rater, & homeowner & registry if necessary Homeowner receives CF-1R,CF-6R, CF-4R, operation & maintenance information for all features and devices. www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 179. Compliance Forms CF-4R Installation forms Installation Responsibility of HERS Rater CF-6R Installation Certificates of Field Verification and Certificate Diagnostic Testing CF-4R Field Verification/HERS CF-4R filled out by hand not acceptable Question: Can the homeowner sign the CF-6R form(s)? www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 180. Compliance Forms CF-4R Installation forms Installation Question: Can the homeowner sign the CF-6R form(s)? CF-6R Installation Certificate CF-4R Field Verification/HERS www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 181. Compliance Forms CF-4R Installation forms Installation Question: Can the homeowner sign the CF-6R form(s)? CF-6R Installation Certificate Answer: yes CF-4R Field Verification/HERS www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 182. Compliance Forms Installation CF-6R Installation Certificate CF-4R Field Verification/HERS www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 183. Compliance Forms Certificate of Compliance (CF-1R) Submitted to plancheck and Prepared by Title-24 consultant or approved copy provided to General designer Contractor Installation CF-6R Installation Certificate CF-4R Field Verification/HERS www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 184. Compliance Forms Certificate of Compliance (CF-1R) Submitted to plancheck and Prepared by Title-24 consultant or approved copy provided to General designer Contractor Installation CF-6R Installation Certificate CF-4R Field Certificate of Installation (CF-6R) Verification/HERS Filled out by contractor and sub- Provided to inspector & HERS Rater contractors & later to the homeowner www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 185. Compliance Forms Certificate of Compliance (CF-1R) Submitted to plancheck and Prepared by Title-24 consultant or approved copy provided to General designer Contractor Installation CF-6R Installation Certificate CF-4R Field Certificate of Installation (CF-6R) Verification/HERS Filled out by contractor and sub- Provided to inspector & HERS Rater contractors & later to the homeowner Certificate of Verification and Diagnostic (CF-4R) Completed by HERS Rater Registered with CHEERS or Calcerts and copy provided to contractor www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 186. Compliance Forms Installation CF-6R Installation Certificate CF-4R Field Verification/HERS www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 187. Compliance Forms Installation CF-6R Installation Certificate CF-4R Field Verification/HERS www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 188. Compliance Forms CF-4R bottom line: CF-4R also forms a major part of Title-24 compliance now. Installation Many HERS verifications are now baseline, required on most projects CF-6R Installation Certificate Contractors will need to know their responsibilities CF-4R Field related to different HERS measures Verification/HERS Contractors need to inspect and test their work HERS raters verifies Good coordination essential. HERS rater will need to be contacted well ahead of required inspections Good record keeping crucial CF-4R major part of utility incentive programs www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 189. Compliance Forms CF-4R bottom line: HERS raters must maintain independence Installation CF-6R Installation Certificate CF-4R Field Verification/HERS www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 190. Compliance Forms Registration New concept and new requirement Introduced in stages thru 2010 Registration January 1, 2010 required for low-rise residential CF-6R Installation buildings, multiple orientations , & HERS measures Certificate CF-4R Field Starting October 1, 2010 registration required for ALL Verification/HERS low-rise residential buildings with HERS measures Registration CF-1R, CF-6R, CF-4R required to be submitted electronically to HERS provider (CHEERS or CalCerts) Registry available to authorized users of HERS data registry Includes energy consultants, builders, owners, contractors, installers, HERS raters, building departments, C.E.C. www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 191. Compliance Forms Registration Implications: If registration required building department will require Registration registered copies of CF-1R , CF-6R, and CF-4R that display their unique registration number CF-6R Installation Certificate Contractors may not be set up to submit their CF-6R forms CF-4R Field electronically for registration Verification/HERS Registration Can use services of HERS raters to facilitate transmittal of CF-6R to registry. However contractor is responsible for content of CF-6R and must sign. HERS rater cannot certify information on a CF-6R form. The days of filling out CF-6R on the hood of contractors work truck are basically over Good communication and record keeping critical Use time left to put into place filing system/record keeping system www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 192. Preparation for 1/1/2009 1 Energy Consultants Download Standards, Manual, Appendixes http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/2008standards/index.html Attend training seminars for approved software Develop record keeping procedure for registration requirement www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 193. Preparation for 1/1/2009 2 Architects/Designers Set up drawing files to accept all forms required on plans Set up note blocks for ASHRAE 62.2 requirements Requirement for load calcs should be part of HVAC bid-spec Window selection cannot be put off until building under construction. Using default U-factors/SHGC for plan-check submittals will make it difficult if not impossible to comply. Bring Title-24 consultant on board early in design stage www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 194. Preparation for 1/1/2009 3 HVAC Contractors Be prepared to perform rough-in duct testing (4% leakage) HERS rater can do this for you Provide training to your installers for proper duct sealing, airflow, refrigerant charge to minimize HERS verification failures Prepare proper load calcs for every job and have documentation ready. Will need system for providing access holes, sensors, and labeling to avoid holdups in HERS verifications Be prepared to fill out electronically CF-6R for HVAC new and change-outs Develop system to record and track CF-6R forms that will be needed later in HERS process or incentive process Develop good relationship with local HERS rater(s) HERS rater cannot be part of your company in any way shape or form, cannot self- verify. HERS raters are audited annually. www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 195. Preparation for 1/1/2009 4 Building Officials Download Standards, Manual, Appendixes http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/2008standards/index.html Building departments will need to set up access to HERS provider data registry. Understand which documents required at plan-check and which are required at inspection (CF-1R, CF-6R, kitchen lighting, CF-4R) Forms are much more data intensive. Get familiar with new layout of forms and all the data that is now required. Address wet signature verses electronic signature issue ahead of time. HERS measures now baseline. Submittals that comply without them should be reviewed closely. Inspectors will need to be familiar with all of the CF-6R forms. If registration required must be registered CF-6R forms, not filled out by hand. Training on ASHRAE 62.2 highly recommended. Become familiar with ventilation calculation methods fan/control features that satisfy this requirement. Important for on-site building inspector, not at plancheck. www.energycode.com Energy Code Works, Inc.
  • 196. Energy Code Works, Inc. Mark Madison CEPE, CEA, AEE, HERS Rater, GreenPoint Rater, ResNet Rater, Member CABEC, CHEERS