Breeding cattle for lower greenhouse gas emissions in an Australian carbon trading environment - Rob Herd

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  • Given the assumed adoption patterns and the continual annual improvement in the RFI trait in bulls used by commercial beef producers there is a slow increase in the amount of methane abated up until 2012 after which the rate of annual improvement in methane abated from the Australian herd is relatively constant. Reaching approximately some 3.1% reduction in methane produced by the Australian beef industry by year 25 or 2026 relative to the 2002 base year. Given the cyclical nature of beef cattle numbers, the size of the cattle herd and assumptions regarding feed quality and growth rates are assumed constant.
  • Breeding cattle for lower greenhouse gas emissions in an Australian carbon trading environment - Rob Herd

    1. 1. BREEDING CATTLE FOR LOWER GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS IN AN AUSTRALIAN CARBON TRADING ENVIRONMENT Robert Herd Industry & Investment NSW Beef Centre, Armidale, NSW This project is supported by funding from the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry as part of the Climate Change Research Program.
    2. 2. <ul><li>Our cattle and sheep: </li></ul><ul><li>convert grass into nutritious and delicious food products </li></ul>METHANE
    3. 3. 95% of cattle emissions
    4. 4. Example: selection for feed efficiency brings a greenhouse gas benefit Reduction in methane emissions accompanies reduction in feed intake .
    5. 5. National Herd with conservative adoption of selection for feed efficiency <ul><li>Cumulative total over 25 years 568,000 t CH 4 total reduction in enteric methane </li></ul><ul><li>Year 2026, >3% annual saving in methane. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Methane yield (MY)
    7. 7. Found High and Low MY bulls
    8. 11. Early results: Averages for Methane Yield of Progeny (g methane/kg feed)
    9. 12. Might selective breeding change? Meat traits Cow traits
    10. 13. <ul><ul><li>Science based </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quantifiable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Auditable. </li></ul></ul>GHG reduction protocols:
    11. 16. Add a BV for Low MY
    12. 17. SUMMARY <ul><li>BREEDING FOR LOWER GHG EMISSIONS FEASIBLE </li></ul>Found High and Low MY bulls
    13. 18. BREEDING CATTLE FOR LOWER GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS This project is supported by funding from the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry as part of the Climate Change Research Program.
    14. 21. Dr. John Goopy Also natural variation in sheep - heritable.
    15. 22. <ul><li>is: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Wide reaching </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Permanent </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cumulative </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Known technology. </li></ul></ul>Genetic improvement

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