Plot Structure and Components
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Plot Structure and Components

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Plot structure (Freitag's model) and the components of plot, including conflict

Plot structure (Freitag's model) and the components of plot, including conflict

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  • Plot is the literary element that describes the structure of a story. A plot diagram is an organizational tool, which is used to map the significant events in a story. By placing the most significant events from a story on the plot diagram, you can visualize the key features of the story.
  • In addition, you can note that some stories follow a circular or episodic plot, and hypertextual stories can be different every time they’re read, as the reader chooses the direction that the story takes. If a story that students are working on does not fit into the triangle structure, think about why the author would choose a different story structure and how the structure has changed.
  • Aristotle defined plot as comprised of three parts: beginning, middle, and end. When all the parts of a story follow naturally from one to the next in a connected way, Aristotle called the narrative structure a unified plot. The parts of a unified plot are linear, leading from one to the next in a cause and effect chain.
  • Freytag modified Aristotle’s system by adding a rising action (or complication) and a falling action to the structure. Freytag’s structure begins with the introduction of a conflict or problem (exposition). At this point, background information is established. Next, the plot moves to rising action, as the conflict or problem is established fully. The mid-point of Freytag’s structure is the climax, the point in the story when there is a crisis or turning point. After the climax, the plot turns to falling action, when the events caused by the decision or crisis of the climax unfold. Finally, the story ends as the events are tied together (resolution). This final stage is also called the dénouement.
  • Some readers find Freytag’s Pyramid is oversimplified. As a result, Freytag’s Pyramid is often modified so that it extends slightly before and after the primary rising and falling action. You might think of this part of the chart as similar to the warm-up and cool-down for the story.
  • Exposition: The mood and conditions existing at the beginning of the story. The setting is identified. The main characters with their positions, circumstances and relationships to one another are established. The exciting force or initial conflict is introduced. Sometimes called the “Narrative HOOK” this begins the conflict that continues throughout the story. Rising Action: The series of events, conflicts, and crises in the story that lead up to the climax, providing the progressive intensity, and complicate the conflict. Climax: The turning point of the story. A crucial event takes place and from this point forward, the protagonist moves toward his inevitable end. The event may be either an action or a mental decision that the protagonist makes. Falling Action: The events occurring from the time of the climax to the end of the story. The main character may encounter more conflicts in this part of the story, but the end is inevitable. Resolution/Denouement: The tying up of loose ends and all of the threads in the story. The conclusion. The hero character either emerges triumphant or is defeated at this point.

Plot Structure and Components Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Teaching Plot Structure Through Short Stories Plot is the literary element that describes the structure of a story. It shows the a causal arrangement of events and actions within a story.
  • 2. Types of Linear Plots
    • Plots can be told in
    Chronological order Flashback In media res (in the middle of things) when the story starts in the middle of the action without exposition
  • 3. Pyramid Plot Structure
    • The most basic and traditional form of plot is pyramid-shaped.
    • This structure has been described in more detail by Aristotle and by Gustav Freytag.
  • 4. Aristotle’s Unified Plot The basic triangle-shaped plot structure was described by Aristotle in 350 BCE. Aristotle used the beginning, middle, and end structure to describe a story that moved along a linear path, following a chain of cause and effect as it works toward the solution of a conflict or crisis.
  • 5. Freytag’s Plot Structure Freytag modified Aristotle’s system by adding a rising action (or complication) and a falling action to the structure. Freytag used the five-part design shown above to describe a story’s plot.
  • 6. Modified Plot Structure Freytag’s Pyramid is often modified so that it extends slightly before and after the primary rising and falling action. You might think of this part of the chart as similar to the warm-up and cool-down for the story.
  • 7. Plot Components Exposition: the start of the story, the situation before the action starts Rising Action: the series of conflicts and crisis in the story that lead to the climax Climax: the turning point, the most intense moment—either mentally or in action Falling Action: all of the action which follows the climax Resolution: the conclusion, the tying together of all of the threads
  • 8. Conflict
    • Conflict is the dramatic struggle between two forces in a story. Without conflict, there is no plot.
  • 9. Types of Conflict Human vs Nature Human vs Society Human vs Self Internal Conflict Human vs Human Interpersonal Conflict