Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Media Literacy For Educators
Media Literacy For Educators
Media Literacy For Educators
Media Literacy For Educators
Media Literacy For Educators
Media Literacy For Educators
Media Literacy For Educators
Media Literacy For Educators
Media Literacy For Educators
Media Literacy For Educators
Media Literacy For Educators
Media Literacy For Educators
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Media Literacy For Educators

240

Published on

Created to assist teachers in defining various forms of media

Created to assist teachers in defining various forms of media

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
240
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Collette KnightMedia Literacy For EducatorsUSB DrivesUSB stands for Universal Serial Bus. It is a small storage device that can be placed in a USB porton a computer. They are used for the storage of files and can be transferred from onecomputer to another, as long as that computer has an USB drive. Information can be written tothe USB disk, as well as removed from the USB disk. It is smaller than a floppy disk. USB drivesare also called: thumb drives, jump drives, pen drives, key drives, and tokens.Example Image:Specifications: USB drives come in many shapes and sized, from really tiny to fairly large.Some have shiny surfaces, varied colors, and designs. Some have a retractable connector, whileothers have a top to cover the connector. Some come on a key chain for ease of storage. Somealso have an activity light so that you can see when data is being written to or erased from thedrive.Storage Capacity: Music** AudioBook Video+Storage Photos** Productivity+++ * + +Capacity * MP3 Word/ PowerPoin 3MP 5MP 10MP Books mins. Songs Excel t 4GB* 3,619 2,381 802 760 408 272 3047 609 8GB* 7,238 4,762 1,604 1,520 816 544 6095 1,208 16GB* 14,476 9,524 3,208 3,040 1,632 1,088 12,190 2,438 32GB* 28,952 19,048 6,416 6,080 3,264 2,176 24,379 4,875 12,83 64GB* 57,904 38,096 12,160 6,528 4,352 48,759 9,752 2 115,80 25,66 128GB* 76,192 24,320 13,056 8,704 97,504 19,488 8 4 231,61 152,38 51,32 195,00 256GB* 48,640 26,112 17,408 38,976 6 4 8 8
  • 2. Collette KnightMedia Literacy For Educators Drives Comparison Pros ConsUSB Drive Many storage sized to choose Small and easily misplaced from Sturdy Many Read/Write Cycles 10 yr. data retentionTapes Fast processing time Used primarily for system High storage capacity backups More expensiveFloppy Disks Can boot from a floppy disk Mostly obsolete: many pc’s do Helpful in working with old not have a floppy drive PC’s Easily damagedOptical Media Easily transferred from one PC Can be easily scratched to another Slow processing time Comes in different formats Not as easily transported (Read only, Write, Read/Write) InexpensivePotential Value in the Library: USB drives are not just useful in the library, but also in theclassroom, and school office. The librarian can use these small storage devices to install anupdate and/or file to various computers in different locations because of its ease of transport.Also, libraries can use this technology to distribute manuals and/or important documents tocertain teachers and can install the files on the teacher’s desktop without interruptingclassroom learning. The cost of USB drives is very low, and many can be purchased to storedifferent types of data.Resources:http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/U/usb_flash_drive.htmlhttp://cgi.ebay.com/Kingston-DataTraveler-DT200-128GB-USB-Flash-Drive-/250653807529?cmd=ViewItem&pt=PCC_Drives_Storage_Internal&hash=item3a5c2193a9http://www.corecomputers.com.au/USBReviewDiagrams.htmhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_flash_drive
  • 3. Collette KnightMedia Literacy For EducatorsPortable Hard Drives:A Portable Hard Drive is a device used for the storage of data. It is located outside of thecomputer and usually connects to the computer through a USB port. Prior to the creation of anexternal hard drive, hard drives were located internally in the computer. This made it difficultto troubleshoot and/or replace. Consumers can purchase a portable hard drive in addition tothe internal hard drive that comes with their computers. Portable hard drives allow the user tosave and/or store large amounts of data in equipment that can be moved from one location toanother. This type of hardware is also used to store the back up from other computer systemsin case those computers fail.Example Images:Specifications: The portable hard drive comes in three main types: SATA (Serial AdvancedTechnology Attachment), IDE (Integrated Drive Electronics), SCSI (Small Computer SystemInterface). Most come with a USB attachment. More expensive varieties come with multipleattachments. Some come networked, meaning they can connect to a wired or wireless routerwith an Ethernet cable. Portable drives are about the size of a book where external drives canbe considerably larger.Product Comparison: Seagate Free Agent GO vs. Iomega eGoSeagate Free Agent GO weighs less than 6 ounces and fits in the palm of the hand. It has a 5year limited warranty. Price structure: 250GB ($70), 320GB ($80), 500GB ($105), 640GB ($120)Iomega eGO costs about $80 for 250GB. It has separate PC and Mac versions. The Mac editionhas Firewire 800 & 400 ports. It comes in 3 colors and has drop guard protection whendropped up to 51”. It comes with virus protection but only has a 3 year warranty. It is stillsmall in size and weighs 1 pound.
  • 4. Collette KnightMedia Literacy For EducatorsPotential Value in the Library: The portable hard drive would be very useful in a library. Thecomputers provided by the school district are limited in the amount of data the internal harddrives can store. The portable hard drive provides additional storage for the librarian. Also,while school districts backup the data placed on shared drives, most library computers do nothave a method to backup the local drive. Important data can be backed up on to the portablehard drive. Also, portable hard drives can be transported from the library to home so that thelibrarian can access data from a location of his or her convenience. The price is not costprohibitive and would be a great asset for the librarian to have.Resources:http://www.amazon.com/Iomega-Portable-External-Drive-34646/dp/B0029D8DGO?SubscriptionId=0K76CZ6RCX2Y05HSNPR2&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B0029D8DGO&tag=csfstext-20http://www.consumersearch.com/external-hard-drives/portable-hard-drives
  • 5. Collette KnightMedia Literacy For EducatorsZip Disk:A Zip Disk, also called the “Super Floppy”, is a small storage device similar to a floppy disk butwith a hard outer case. Zip Disks were created to be used with an Iomega Zip Drive. They areremovable disks that can store files. The Iomega drive can read and write files to the Zip Diskand uses particular software. The software from the drive can catalog the disks and place lockson the data for security. The Zip Disk can be used for storage and/or backing up of various files,such as, office application files, music, videos, presentations, and digital photos.Example Image:Specifications: This removable disk comes inthree sizes: 100MB, 250MB, and 750MB. The250MB disk can read and write 100MB disks. The750MB disk can read all other sized Zip Disks butcan only write 250MB and 750MB disks. The size of azip disk is 97mm X 98.5mm X 6mm. It has asmall reflector window on the back that is used by thedrive to recognize this is a zip disk and protects the drive. It cannot be used in other non-zipdrives because of this reflective component.Product Comparison: Zip Disk vs. Floppy Disk1 250MB Zip Disk is equivalent to 174 floppy disks as far as the amount of data storedZip Disks are faster than floppy disks (up to 2.4MB/Sec compared to 0.06 MB/Sec for floppy)While Zip Disks contain more data, IT professionals were reluctant to remove the floppy drivefrom pc’s due to software and operating systems designed to automatically write to a floppydrive
  • 6. Collette KnightMedia Literacy For EducatorsPotential Value in the Library: The Zip Disk would be useful to the librarian because of itssturdiness, and protection of the data it contains. The issue would be locating a special ZipDrive, as computers do not come with one. This may be an added expense. I’m not sure howeffective and/or efficient it would be to purchase a zip drive for the purpose of backing up data.Most school districts automatically back up data that is placed on a shared drive. The Zip Diskis more reliably used for backing up, not for portable storage. Most computers come with USBports for portable storage which are easier to move from one place to another because of theirphysical size, capacity, and key chain component.Resources:http://www.yourdictionary.com/computer/zip-diskhttp://www.usbyte.com/common/zip_100_mb.htmhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iomega_Zip_drive
  • 7. Collette KnightMedia Literacy For EducatorsSuperDisk:A SuperDisk is a storage device that uses a floptical technology involving a laser to writeinformation to the drive. It is sometimes called the LS-120 or LS-240. It was created by acompany called Iomega, then 3M, and then created by Panasonic and Mitsubishi. It has a fastprocessing speed and can contain a large amount of data. It is rarely used in the United States,but is still used in Asia and Australia.Example Image:Specifications: SuperDisks have up to a 240MB storage capacity. They are primarily used asan alternative to a floppy disk. SuperDisks are backwards compatible with 1.44 MB and 720 KBfloppies. They have a fast IDE interface. SuperDisks are still used on older servers to store dataand are used to troubleshoot and debug software. Size specifications vary but common size is:12.7mm high by 96mm wide by 124mm long. These drives operate on low power to savebattery life. Drives Comparison Pros ConsSuperDisk Can contain a large amount of Obsolete in the U.S data compared to floppies Replaces all data on drive with Fast Processing time subsequent writes to the disk Good for debugging software Difficult to replace if broken if pc did not have a floppy (discontinued technology) drive Cannot be read on older Operates on Low Power MacIntosh computersUSB Drive Many storage sized to choose Small and easily misplaced from
  • 8. Collette KnightMedia Literacy For Educators Sturdy Many Read/Write Cycles 10 yr. data retentionTapes Fast processing time Used primarily for system High storage capacity backups More expensiveFloppy Disks Can boot from a floppy disk Mostly obsolete: many pc’s do Helpful in working with old not have a floppy drive PC’s Easily damagedOptical Media Easily transferred from one PC Can be easily scratched to another Slow processing time Comes in different formats Not as easily transported (Read only, Write, Read/Write) InexpensivePotential Value in the Library: The SuperDisk is mostly obsolete in the United States because ithas been replaced by drives that are smaller and have a better ability to read and write multipletimes to the disk. The main disadvantage to a SuperDisk is that when you write newinformation to the disk it wipes out all the existing data on the disk. Newer drives do not havethat disadvantage. The one value this disk would have to a library is in the use of creating abackup of a main system. Even keeping that in mind, the SuperDisk is difficult to find in a storeand other storage devices would be more beneficial.Resources:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SuperDiskhttp://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0EIN/is_1997_Oct_15/ai_19857372/
  • 9. Collette KnightMedia Literacy For EducatorsMemory Cards:Memory cards are electronic flash memory data storage devices. They are primarily used tostore data. Memory cards are used in a variety of electronic equipment, such as, digitalcameras, cell phones, MP3 players, video game consoles and laptop computers. They canretain data and do not require power to hold the data. The most common type of memory cardis called SD and can contain up to 64 GB of data.Specifications: Standards Card family Varieties Entry date Picture[1] Major features organizations Thinner (3.3 mm), I flash based only, sizes available up to 128 GBCompactFlash SanDisk 1994 Thicker (5.0 mm), older flash based, but II usually Microdrives, sizes available up to 128GB Very thin (45.0 × 37.0 × 0.76 mm thick), no wear levelingSmartMedia Toshiba 3.3/5 V 1995 controller, sizes available up to 128 MB Thin and small (24 mm × 32 mm × 1.4 mm), MMC 1997 sizes available up to 4 GB Siemens AG,MultiMediaCard SanDisk Compact size (24 mm RS- × 18 mm × 1.4 mm), MMC/MMC 2003/2005 sizes available up to Mobile 2 GB
  • 10. Collette KnightMedia Literacy For Educators Compact size (24 mm × 32 mm × 1.4 mm), MMCplus 2005 faster, optional DRM, sizes available up to 2 GB Sub compact size (14 mm × 12 mm × MMCmicro 2005 1.1 mm), optional DRM, 16MB - 1GBProduct Comparison: Memory Card vs. CD’s slotMusic Compact DiscIntroduced 2008 1982 So small you might run Conveniently hand-Size it through the laundry by sized, yet incredibly accident thin Untold millions ofMusic selection 29 albums albums Major merchants like Every music store onAvailability Best Buy and Wal-Mart the planetBacked by Four major labels Every label Exactly the same as aPrice About the same as a CD CD CD quality “highSound CD quality quality”DRM None None Yes, either directly orUse on your PC? Yes, with an adapter by rippingUse with a CD Yes, by transferring Yes, directly
  • 11. Collette KnightMedia Literacy For Educatorsplayer music, then burning CD Yes, by transferring Yes, by ripping andUse with an iPod music to PC and then to synching iPod Yes, by ripping andUse with a phone Yes transferringChances you’ll beable to play it in 20 Not good Reasonably goodyears Chances your Alarmingly high Reasonably low spaniel will eat itPotential Value in the Library: Memory cards are extremely useful to the school librarian. Theycan be used with many different types of equipment that the school librarian may beresponsible for. Digital cameras require them, mp3 players, video game consoles like the WII,and laptop computers. Each of these equipment types have a purpose in a school library, so alibrarian should have a good stock of available memory cards to use with these devices.Resources:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory_cardshttp://www.amazon.com/SanDisk-Class-Memory-SDSDB-8192-Packaging/dp/B0018BOLIC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1278173543&sr=1-1http://technologizer.com/2008/09/22/slotmusic-vs-cd-the-ultimate-comparison/
  • 12. Collette KnightMedia Literacy For EducatorsDigital Audio Tapes:The Digital Audio Tape was a signal recording and playback device developed by Sony. It wasintroduced in 1987. It looks like a compact audio cassette. The recording is digital and notanalog. It may only be recorded on one side similar to a video cassette. Its primary purposewas to record music or sound in a studio setting. However, this technology did not catch onwith the general public due to its high cost and its issues with copyright. This type oftechnology is still used in studio recording sessions.Example Image:Specifications: The Digital Audio Tape looks like a compact audio cassette. It uses a 4MM magnetic tape in aprotective case. Its size dimensions are: 73mm X 54mm X 10.5mm. One digital audio tapecosts $39.99 on Amazon. It usually comes in a length of 60 minutes.Product Comparison:DAT technology is more expensive per hour than Hard Disk recording. Hard Disk recording ismore reliable and the equipment is less expensive to maintain. It is also easier to replace aHard Disk recorder than it is to replace DAT, because DAT is no longer being made.Potential Value in the Library: While it is useful to record events where audio is required, thecost of this product outweighs its benefits. Also, it is difficult to purchase a digital recorder andeven more difficult to find someone to service digital recorders. It is also difficult to locateblank DAT tapes. It would be better for a librarian to purchase Flash/Sd memory recorders.Resources:http://www.amazon.com/Maxell-DM-60-DAT-Digital/dp/B001DIKY90/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1278175814&sr=1-1http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Audio_Tapehttp://homerecording.about.com/od/tapingliveconcerts/a/all_about_DAT.htm

×