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An interactive powerpoint used during an inferring lesson

An interactive powerpoint used during an inferring lesson

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Inferring Interactive Review Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Inferring Review Created by: Collette Knight
  • 2. What is inferring?• Inferring is when the reader combines clues from the story with what he or she already knows to infer an answer.
  • 3. Why do readers have to infer?• Sometimes the author doesn’t state things directly.• The author wants the reader to use clues from the story to get answers.
  • 4. What makes a good inference?• A good inference is based on evidence. It isn’t just a wild guess.
  • 5. How does a reader infer an answer?• Readers should take clues from the story, combine the clues with what they already know to infer the answers.• Whenever you read, use what you already know from your own experiences to help you make inferences.
  • 6. Inferring Formula Clues What you Myfrom the already Inference story know
  • 7. Terms related to Inferring• Infer• Conclude• Suggest• Imply• Predict• Probably
  • 8. What does an inferring question look like on the TAKS test?• What can you infer about…?• What are some clues from the story that tell you this?• From the character’s thoughts and actions, the reader can infer that he/she…• What can the reader conclude about…?
  • 9. One Inference Strategy:Inference “It Says” “I Say” “And So”Question What does the Using prior Based on…I text say… knowledge, can infer… what you say.. Combine Write the List clues clues from What do you question. from the the story already know story. from your with what you already experiences? know to answer the question.
  • 10. Practice Paragraph #1Pedro wanted to get out of bed, but he couldn’t.His entire body felt weak and it hurt to move. Hishead was on fire, but he felt like chunks of ice. Hereached for a glass of orange juice and carefullyswallowed it. He wished mom would come backfrom the kitchen with his soup and crackers.What can you infer about Pedro? a. Pedro was sick at home. b. Pedro was a school waiting for mom. c. Pedro was in the Dr’s office.
  • 11. Let’s use the strategy chart!What can you Pedro wanted to I felt sick one get out of bed, Pedro must beinfer about morning and had but he couldn’t. sick at homePedro? to stay in bed all since he is in day. bed and his His entire body mom was in the felt weak and it hurt to move. My dad made kitchen. me eat soup too! He wished mom would come back from the kitchen with his soup and crackers.
  • 12. Looking for Details• The author won’t always tell you everything in a passage.• Look for details that help you understand the plot, the characters, and the setting of the story.• Ask yourself, “What do these details tell me?” “What doesn’t the author tell me with these details?”
  • 13. Inference Review Quiz
  • 14. Directions• Read the question carefully.• Click on the correct answer.• If you don’t get it right the first time, Click the back arrow, and try again.
  • 15. Question #1• What does the author want readers to use to find answers?a. The dictionaryb. Clues from the storyc. A guess
  • 16. Your Right!• B is the correct answer. Readers should use clues from the story to help them find answers.
  • 17. Sorry, Try Again.
  • 18. Question #2• Is a good inference based on guesses or evidence? a. Guesses b. Evidence
  • 19. Your Right!• B is the correct answer. Good inferences are based on evidence from the story.
  • 20. Sorry, Try Again.
  • 21. Question #3The reader should use what he or she knows toinfer the answer?1. True2. False
  • 22. Your Right!• True. The reader should use what he or she already knows to infer the answer.
  • 23. Sorry, Try Again.
  • 24. Question #4What is missing from the formula? What you My ? already Inference know a. A wild guess b. The author’s purpose c. Clues from the story
  • 25. Your Right!• C is the correct answer. Clues from the story is missing from the formula.
  • 26. Sorry, Try Again.
  • 27. Question #5Each word below may appear in an inferringquestion except:a. Predictb. Concludec. Inferd. Symbolizes
  • 28. Your Right!• D is the correct answer. The word symbolize will not appear in an inferring question.
  • 29. Sorry, Try Again.
  • 30. Question #6Which of the following TAKS questions is anexample of inferring?a. What can the reader conclude about…?b. What is paragraph 3 mainly about?c. Which of these best summarizes the passage?
  • 31. Your Right!• A is the correct answer. What can the reader conclude about…? is an inferring question.
  • 32. Sorry, Try Again.
  • 33. Question #7What does the phrase, “It Says…” refer to in theInference Strategy Chart?a. What the character says.b. What the author says.c. The evidence from the story.
  • 34. Your Right!• C is the correct Answer. “It Says…” refers to the evidence from the story.
  • 35. Sorry, Try Again.
  • 36. Question #8Looking for details helps the readerunderstand:a. How many words are in the story.b. Where the author wrote the story.c. The plot, the characters, and the setting of the story.
  • 37. Your Right!• C is the correct answer. Looking for details in the story helps the reader understand the plot, the characters, and the setting of the story.
  • 38. Sorry, Try Again.
  • 39. Question #9When making an inference, the reader shouldask himself/herself:“What do these details tell me?” True or False
  • 40. Your Right!• True is correct. The reader should ask himself, “What do the details in the story tell me?”
  • 41. Sorry, Try Again.
  • 42. Question #10In 1938, a woman found a very strange looking fish. It had bluespots and was about five feet long. It looked like a drawing of afish that had lived million of years ago. Everyone thought itwas extinct. The woman was very excited to have found it!What might you be able to infer from the paragraph?a. Not many people have seen this type of fish.b. No one else would be interested in this fish.c. Many people have seen this type of fish before.
  • 43. Your Right!• A is the correct answer.Clues in the story:It looked like a drawing of a fish that had lived millions of yearsago.Everyone thought it was extinct.The woman was very excited to have found it!+My own knowledge:I know the word extinct means an animal that no longer exists.=My inference:A. Not many people have seen this type of fish.
  • 44. Sorry, Try Again.
  • 45. Acknowledgements• This interactive PowerPoint was created by Collette Knight.• Clipart buttons and sounds are found in Office 2010 and are the property of Microsoft.• Image resources:www.chatt.hdsb.ca/.../hug-club-clip-art-591.jpgwww.clipartguide.com/_pages/0511-0809-0717-59...http://school.discoveryeducation.com/clipart/images/success-boy-color.gifhttp://clow.ipsd.org/images/lmc/lmc_whats_up_2007_8/bulb_idea.gifhttp://s7.orientaltrading.com/is/image/OrientalTrading/39_2043?wid=200&hei=200&fmt=jpeg&qlt=90,0&resMode=sharp2&op_usm=0.9,1.0,8,0
  • 46. Resources• Comprehension Skill Cards. (2006). Remedia Publications: www.rempub.com• DiPino, J. & Thresher, C. (2002). Best practices in reading. Merrimack, NH: Options Publishing.• McFadden, S. (2007). Summary and inference. Huntington Beach, CA: Creative Teaching Press.• Texas Treasures, Grade 4, Unit 4. (2011). Student Practice Book. Page 93. New York, NY.• Wallis, K. (2006). Understanding making inferences. New Jersey: The Peoples Publishing Group, Inc.