FACULTY ADVISING: Helping Students Matriculate Through Effective Advising Dillard University 2010 CTLAT Workshop January 5...
Advance Organizers <ul><li>Proposed Mission Statement </li></ul><ul><li>Goals of Advising and Measurable Outcomes </li></u...
Proposed Mission Statement:  Academic Advising <ul><li>The mission of advising is to use a teaching and learning approach ...
GOALS OF FACULTY ADVISING AT DILLARD UNIVERSITY <ul><li>To teach students how to take ownership of their educational and a...
Measurable Outcomes <ul><li>80% of students will complete a schedule during the early registration process; </li></ul><ul>...
Advising Model <ul><li>Talent Development Model </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teach students how to explore alternatives, apply de...
Student Learning Outcomes <ul><li>As a result of participating in certain activities related to student-centered advising,...
Faculty Learning Outcomes <ul><li>As a result of participating in advising-centered professional development opportunities...
Assessment <ul><li>We will use the ACT Survey of Academic Advising, along with other measures. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Any s...
<ul><li>New Year, New Beginnings:  </li></ul><ul><li>Affecting Persistence Through Effective Advising </li></ul>
Resolutions <ul><li>Number one New Year’s Resolution? </li></ul><ul><li>Faculty Resolution? </li></ul><ul><li>But what hap...
Faced with Realities <ul><li>I don’t have enough time to… </li></ul><ul><li>I don’t have what I need to… </li></ul><ul><li...
Our Realities <ul><li>Quality of students </li></ul><ul><li>Meeting students where they are, yet retaining quality </li></...
Advising for Successful Matriculation <ul><li>Success = Graduation </li></ul><ul><li>or  </li></ul><ul><li>Career Counseli...
Concept National  Academic  Advising  Association, 2006
Characteristics of an  Effective Advisor <ul><li>Informational (What the advisor should know): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Requi...
Characteristics of an  Effective Advisor <ul><li>Conceptual (What the advisor needs to understand): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>...
Characteristics of an  Effective Advisor <ul><li>Relational (How the advisor should communicate with students): </li></ul>...
Building a Successful Foundation <ul><li>Fall 2009 to Spring 2010 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Checking In </li></ul></ul><ul><ul...
“ Brick walls are there for a reason: they let us prove how badly we want things.” – Randy Pausch,  The Last Lecture  ( Bo...
In Closing… <ul><li>Note the list of upcoming professional development opportunities. </li></ul><ul><li>Send Dr. Morelon-Q...
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DU FACULTY ADVISING Helping Students Matriculate Through Effective Advising

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The mission of advising is to use a teaching and learning approach that empowers students as they clarify and realize their goals through both curricular and co-curricular engagement.

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  • Advising is MORE THAN An opportunity to sign schedules A workshop
  • Focus on developing the students we have, not the ones we WISH we had. Help students understand how various pieces of their curriculum fit together Show them how co-curricular activities support or enhance their educational experience. Allow students to come up with the answers, to identify the resources, to find internships, etc. Co-curricular experiences are very important. Educate students about importance of discipline-related organizations, student engagement, service learning, volunteerism, etc., especially when done in their major. Stress importance of the opportunity for students to take ownership of their educational experience. Advising should be a dialogue, not just an opportunity for the advisor to tell the student what they need to know.
  • These are the high-level SLOs for students. We are providing you with a table of proposed activities as well.
  • Each division was given New Student Information Sheets this past fall. As an advisor, the information must be used to effectively advise students. Contact your advisees at the beginning of the semester. Schedule monthly lunch dates. As weather gets nicer, meet as a group outside. Estaing and maintain connections and use the time to reinforce strategies for educational success. Use the advising syllabus as a guide for encouraging students to participate in co-curricular activities. Creates a connection to the major and the institution. Students who identify with their institution are more likely to be engaged and thus more likely to persist and graduate. Quickly refer students who are in trouble. Use the Resource Guide provided last fall.
  • The ACT Survey of Academic Advising measures Difference between interactions w/advisor and level of satisfaction with the interactions Students’ impressions of their advisor Also asks how often students meet w/advisor Whether that was sufficient and how much time is spent in an advising session. Also allows written comments.
  • Learn your major inside and out. Make sure you advise student according to their catalog. You don’t want to mis-advise a student and prolong their time to degree. The catalog is online for your use. Use the New Student Information Sheets (provided to the Academic Deans this semester) to determine which courses your advisees should take. Reduced Load and Probationary students can register for no more than 12-14 hrs; Freshmen must be registered for as many core courses as possible before major courses so they can complete their core in 2 hrs. Freshmen should be registered for no more than one science course. Try not to register students for any upper-level courses. Attend the Organizational Fair sponsored each fall (during SOAR) by the Division of Student Success to learn about student organizations. Then encourage your students to participate. Faculty should have their fingers on the pulse of the community and industry. Using that information for students is a great opportunity for you to stay connected and to get the student connected. Know the policies for students who want to take courses elsewhere.
  • During the early part of this presentation, we reviewed the proposed mission statement and goals. We are providing you with a copy of rights and responsibilities as well. Try to have ongoing conversations with students and always remind them of their as well as your role. Find and share ‘teachable moments’ that will help student identify ways to take advantage of your expertise.
  • Create a student-advisor relationship in which there are shared responsibilities. Office hours posted and honored. Open Dialogue, not a lecture. Try to listen more and talk less. Don’t allow student to leave without clarifying what you thought you heard and enabling student to outline a plan of action. Remind students that their education is ultimately their responsibility. Simple things like placing your office hours and phone number on the door. Also providing space for students to sign up for appointments anytime in the year. You may want to ask the student Why they are in college What they want to do in the future What steps they need to take to make the future a reality What co-curricular activities they are involved in that will help them grow
  • CHECKING IN Group advising at beginning of semester (basic discussions, answering questions, modeling behavior, etc.) Encourage students to confirm advising sessions thruout semester ADVISING SYLLABUS Lists student learning outcomes Provides list of roles and responsibilities for both advisor and advisee Serves as a reminder for students throughout their academic career
  • DU FACULTY ADVISING Helping Students Matriculate Through Effective Advising

    1. 1. FACULTY ADVISING: Helping Students Matriculate Through Effective Advising Dillard University 2010 CTLAT Workshop January 5, 2010 Facilitated by: Dr. Lenetra Jefferson and Dr. Carla Morelon-Quainoo
    2. 2. Advance Organizers <ul><li>Proposed Mission Statement </li></ul><ul><li>Goals of Advising and Measurable Outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>Advising Model </li></ul><ul><li>Student & Faculty Learning Outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>Characteristics of an Effective Advisor </li></ul><ul><li>Advising Syllabus </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Rewards and Recognition </li></ul>
    3. 3. Proposed Mission Statement: Academic Advising <ul><li>The mission of advising is to use a teaching and learning approach that empowers students as they clarify and realize their goals through both curricular and co-curricular engagement. </li></ul>
    4. 4. GOALS OF FACULTY ADVISING AT DILLARD UNIVERSITY <ul><li>To teach students how to take ownership of their educational and advising experiences; </li></ul><ul><li>To provide students with timely and accurate information that facilitates their decision-making process; </li></ul><ul><li>To provide professional development opportunities that enhance the capacity of faculty advising to effectively and efficiently advise students; </li></ul><ul><li>To promote the shared responsibility of academic advising between student and advisor; </li></ul><ul><li>To evaluate and assess the advising process and use results for improvement, rewards and recognition. </li></ul>
    5. 5. Measurable Outcomes <ul><li>80% of students will complete a schedule during the early registration process; </li></ul><ul><li>50% of faculty will attend monthly professional development opportunities that bolster the capacity of faculty advising to effectively and efficiently advise students; </li></ul><ul><li>80% of students will indicate “Satisfied” or “Very Satisfied” on the Advising Survey in regards to their advising experience. </li></ul><ul><li>80% of students will indicate “Agree” or “Strongly Agree” on the Advising Survey when asked about impressions of the advisor. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Advising Model <ul><li>Talent Development Model </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teach students how to explore alternatives, apply decision-making strategies, accept responsibility for their decisions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teach the value, intended effect, and desired outcomes of higher learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teach students to put the college experience into a broader perspective </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teach students how to think on their own. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Refer students to campus programs, resources and activities. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Treat students as participants, not spectators, in the advising process. </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Student Learning Outcomes <ul><li>As a result of participating in certain activities related to student-centered advising, students will be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>complete the full early registration cycle as evidenced by a confirmed schedule; </li></ul><ul><li>utilize CampusWeb to select courses and track academic progress; </li></ul><ul><li>confirm/revisit academic major/choices based on self-appraisal of one’s interests, skills, goals and academic performance; </li></ul><ul><li>demonstrate awareness of and willingness to participate in both curricular and co-curricular resources designed to enhance one’s academic experience and preparation to realize post-baccalaureate goals; and </li></ul><ul><li>independently conduct career exploration activities that include summer research, service learning and volunteer opportunities in the major. </li></ul>
    8. 8. Faculty Learning Outcomes <ul><li>As a result of participating in advising-centered professional development opportunities, faculty advisors will be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>Use institutional policies, procedures and information to effectively advise students; </li></ul><ul><li>Provide timely, accurate and relevant institutional, discipline-specific and other information during the advising process; </li></ul><ul><li>Use appropriate strategies to facilitate students’ realistic self-appraisal of the connection between their goals, behaviors and aptitude; </li></ul><ul><li>Teach students how to identify curricular and co-curricular opportunities (e.g., undergraduate research, internships, student organizations, student support services, etc.) that expand students’ capacity to become global leaders; </li></ul><ul><li>Display attitudes that reflect high expectations, an appreciation for respectful relationship with advisees, and respect for diversity; </li></ul><ul><li>Display attitudes and behaviors reflecting an interest in being accessible, available and approachable; and </li></ul><ul><li>Exhibit the ability to identify referrals to other institutional resources (e.g., mental health, student support services, etc.) at a critical moment. </li></ul>
    9. 9. Assessment <ul><li>We will use the ACT Survey of Academic Advising, along with other measures. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Any suggestions? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ideally, the data will be used to support rewards and recognition efforts. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How can we best recognize and reward effective advisors? </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. <ul><li>New Year, New Beginnings: </li></ul><ul><li>Affecting Persistence Through Effective Advising </li></ul>
    11. 11. Resolutions <ul><li>Number one New Year’s Resolution? </li></ul><ul><li>Faculty Resolution? </li></ul><ul><li>But what happens to Resolutions? </li></ul>
    12. 12. Faced with Realities <ul><li>I don’t have enough time to… </li></ul><ul><li>I don’t have what I need to… </li></ul><ul><li>I just give up, because (insert your own here) </li></ul>
    13. 13. Our Realities <ul><li>Quality of students </li></ul><ul><li>Meeting students where they are, yet retaining quality </li></ul><ul><li>Time management (students and faculty), less time to do more </li></ul><ul><li>Owning your time </li></ul><ul><li>Where is our EASY button? </li></ul>
    14. 14. Advising for Successful Matriculation <ul><li>Success = Graduation </li></ul><ul><li>or </li></ul><ul><li>Career Counseling </li></ul><ul><li>Dream Squashing </li></ul><ul><li>Reality Check </li></ul><ul><li>Putting Schedule in Computer </li></ul>
    15. 15. Concept National Academic Advising Association, 2006
    16. 16. Characteristics of an Effective Advisor <ul><li>Informational (What the advisor should know): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Requirements of the Core and major </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Academic policies and procedures (e.g., Reduced Load, Probation) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Referral sources (i.e., Student Support Services) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Transfer options </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Co-curricular activities and programs that can broaden students’ portfolio </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Online resources related to major and goals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Employment opportunities and trends </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Characteristics of an Effective Advisor <ul><li>Conceptual (What the advisor needs to understand): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The advising mission </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Expected outcomes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rights and responsibilities of advisor and advisee </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Role of advising in persistence and student development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students’ expectations of the advising experience </li></ul></ul>
    18. 18. Characteristics of an Effective Advisor <ul><li>Relational (How the advisor should communicate with students): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Available, Approachable, Accessible </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Clearly communicates institutional expectations, discipline norms </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Has high expectations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Listens well, talks less, always clarifies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Supportive/encouraging </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Talks with students about their values, interests, strengths and areas for improvement </li></ul></ul>
    19. 19. Building a Successful Foundation <ul><li>Fall 2009 to Spring 2010 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Checking In </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Advising Sessions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Advising Syllabus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jenzabar </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Advising Notes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Online Advising </li></ul></ul>
    20. 20. “ Brick walls are there for a reason: they let us prove how badly we want things.” – Randy Pausch, The Last Lecture ( Book )
    21. 21. In Closing… <ul><li>Note the list of upcoming professional development opportunities. </li></ul><ul><li>Send Dr. Morelon-Quainoo an email ( [email_address] ) if you have suggestions, questions or comments. </li></ul><ul><li>Thanks to those who have participated in this process: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dr. Lenetra Jefferson </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dr. Candance Russell </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dr. Bernard Singleton </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dr. Clinette Chitman-Washington </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dr. Henrietta Harris </li></ul></ul>
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