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Call For Proposals Seventeenth National Hbcu Faculty Development Symposium October 21 23 2010
Call For Proposals Seventeenth National Hbcu Faculty Development Symposium October 21 23 2010
Call For Proposals Seventeenth National Hbcu Faculty Development Symposium October 21 23 2010
Call For Proposals Seventeenth National Hbcu Faculty Development Symposium October 21 23 2010
Call For Proposals Seventeenth National Hbcu Faculty Development Symposium October 21 23 2010
Call For Proposals Seventeenth National Hbcu Faculty Development Symposium October 21 23 2010
Call For Proposals Seventeenth National Hbcu Faculty Development Symposium October 21 23 2010
Call For Proposals Seventeenth National Hbcu Faculty Development Symposium October 21 23 2010
Call For Proposals Seventeenth National Hbcu Faculty Development Symposium October 21 23 2010
Call For Proposals Seventeenth National Hbcu Faculty Development Symposium October 21 23 2010
Call For Proposals Seventeenth National Hbcu Faculty Development Symposium October 21 23 2010
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Call For Proposals Seventeenth National Hbcu Faculty Development Symposium October 21 23 2010

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  • 1. Call for Proposals Seventeenth National HBCU Faculty Development Symposium October 21-23, 2010 Call for Proposals Seventeenth National HBCU Faculty Development Symposium October 21-23, 2010 “Closing the Generational Divide: Strategies that work for Teaching and Assessing Millennial Students at HBCUs” Hilton Riverside Hotel - New Orleans, Louisiana The need to keep up with today’s student is a necessity if we are to engage them effectively in the classroom. We need to know what strategies or high impact activities work and which are no longer applicable for millennial students at HBCUs. What technologies, formative assessments and other tools can we use to enhance academic success and time to graduation? These, among other topics, are strategies we want to explore for our theme to close the generational divide. The proposals for millennial students should be for interactive workshops that can fit into one hour sessions of active audience participation and demonstrations based on the theme of the conference and strands of the symposium, and should show methods used for promoting your objectives. Strands of the HBCU Faculty Development Symposium (see below for detailed descriptions: • Collaborative Models • Active Learning and Engagement • Curriculum Design and Revision • Diversity and Globalization • Learning Across the Curriculum & Learning Communities • Educational Technology • Assessment and Evaluation • Civic Engagement and Social Justice • Special Topics in Health, Natural and Engineering Sciences The Call for Proposals is due on or before April 2, 2010. Notifications of acceptance of paper will be sent by May 7, 2010. Please submit your abstracts electronically to network@hbcufdn.org or visit the HBCUFDN website: http://hbcufdn.org and submit online. All proposals should include the following information:
  • 2. "A Network of Faculty from Historically Black Colleges and Universities"
  • 3. Call for Proposals Seventeenth National HBCU Faculty Development Symposium October 21-23, 2010 Title Presentation: 1. Abstract (For conference program-Maximum 100 words): 2. Presenter (Attach a 500 word bio-sketch for each presenter): First Presenter: Phone Number: Email: Fax Number: College/University: Address: Second Presenter: Phone Number: Email: Fax Number: College/University: Address: Third Presenter: Phone Number: Email: Fax Number: College/University: Address:
  • 4. 3. Program Strand: 4. Presentation Objectives: 5. Proposal Summary Content/Description (Maximum 500 words): 6. Session Format: Rate Choices from 1 (primary) - 4 One Hour: Half-hour: 7. Time Needed: Panel Concurrent Session Roundtable 8. Resources Needed: Check all that apply (Please bring your own laptop and provide the software toFlipchartpresentation). support Data Projector
  • 5. Submit all proposals to: Internet: network@hbcufdn.org
  • 6. The HBCU Faculty Development Network Program Strands Strand 1: Collaborative Models • Professional networks to share information • College team teaching • Faculty mentorship for tenure and promotion • Improve teaching and learning for special college populations • Appropriate policies and procedures for monitoring individual student progress • Collaborative learning models • Instructional planning team • Cooperative learning environment that promotes learning Strand II: Assessment and Evaluation • Institutional assessment • Program and departmental assessment • Classroom assessment that promotes learning • Quality enhancement planning • Accreditation assessment (NCATE, SACS, etc.) • Exemplary assessment model programs. • Continuous improvement • Assessing K-12 partnerships • Assessment of projects that predict student outcomes • Assessment of non-academic services • Assessment of distant education • Assessment tools and techniques • Aggregating and disaggregating of data for accreditation • Campus/department assessment plans and practices • Retention enhancement programs and strategies including Title III Programs
  • 7. • Focus groups • Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) • Formative and summative assessments • Methods of assessment • Measurements • Grading and testing • Assessing general education • Reporting and using assessment results • Closing the loop Strand III: Active Learning and Engagement • Active learning strategies • Engaging students through various methods other than lecture • Using active learning in the classroom • Principles of active learning • Relationship between active learning and performance • Problem/inquiry-based learning • Motivating and engaging students • Approaches for assessing student engagement • Teaching different generations of students • Active-learning strategies that work • Ways to make personal connections that impact learning • Creating climates conducive to learning in large classes • The mechanics of successful design and implementation of active learning • Socratic dialogue in teaching and learning • Cooperative learning • Collaborative learning • Problem based learning • Discussion groups
  • 8. • Peer teaching • Seminars • Learning and learning styles Strand IV: Curriculum Design and Revision • Current trends in curriculum development • Responding to the needs of older adult learners • Curriculum updating • Undergraduate research • Program review • Curriculum design that link industry with teaching and learning • Responding to the educational needs of transitioning baby-boomers • Trends in program offerings – Executive Ph.D. programs, intercession classes, etc. • Program design • Course design, revisions, and implementation Strands V: Learning Across the Curriculum and Learning Communities • Model service learning programs • Relationship between service learning and academic performance • Integrating Bioethics into the curriculum • Teaching first-year college students • Teaching the under-prepared college students • Teaching mathematics to first-year college students • Innovative teaching programs in science and engineering • Cooperative learning and service learning • Experiential learning • Professional learning communities • Community based participatory evaluation/research • Learning opportunities inside and outside classroom, internships, community service, etc. • Writing, speaking, thinking, reading, quantitative reasoning or technology across the curriculum
  • 9. • Critical and reflective thinking • Interdisciplinary/integrated studies • Multidisciplinary learning • Community development among students • Curricula, residential, developmental, honors, graduate, first year, major, or co-curricular learning communities • Team work • Curricula connections • Cognitive development Strand VI: Education Technology • Successful on-line and distant learning programs • New ideas and approaches that link technology to learning • Ways to assess technology based learning • Ethical and social implications of education technology • Integrating educational theories into eLearning • Blogs and Podcasting • ROI for on-line and distant learning programs • Technology innovations in the classroom • Instructional resources, approaches, and student outcomes • Technological, pedagogical, library, and administrative policies and support issues • Programs to increase an understanding of technology in the teaching/learning process • Quality assurance, student retention, efficiency, and effectiveness of technology use your Campus Strand VII: Civic Engagement and Social Justice • Pedagogical strategies, curricula design, and conceptual frameworks for social justice • Advocates and civil liberties • Service learning • Foundations, frameworks, and curricula designs • Experiential education
  • 10. • Community service • Community action research • Capacity building (human, infrastructure, etc.) • Community needs • Environmental justice • Minority health disparities Strand VIII: Special Topics • Effective faculty professional development programs • Effective leadership programs • Knowledge management • Entrepreneurial leadership • Promoting teaching and scholarships • Faculty as change agents • Avoiding faculty-burnout • Post-tenure review programs • Innovative mentoring models that involve mid-career faculty • Writing for publication in referred journals • Innovative programs to attract and retain students • Innovative programs to attract and retain faculty • Grant and contract writing • Research Strand IX: Diversity and Globalization • Inclusion • Gender • Racism, sexism, heterosexism, anti-Semitism, ableism, classism • Multicultural education • Religious differences • Study abroad programs
  • 11. • International programs • Generations in the workplace • Engagement and trust • Cultural diversity at the workplace For additional information, contact: HBCU Faculty Development Network Phyllis Worthy Dawkins, President Dillard University 2601 Gentilly Boulevard New Orleans, Louisiana 70122 Office: (504) 816-4368 ♦ Fax: (504) 816-4144 ♦ Internet: network@hbcufdn.org "A Network of Faculty from Historically Black Colleges and Universities"

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