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Want a Security Clearance: This is what you need to know
Want a Security Clearance: This is what you need to know
Want a Security Clearance: This is what you need to know
Want a Security Clearance: This is what you need to know
Want a Security Clearance: This is what you need to know
Want a Security Clearance: This is what you need to know
Want a Security Clearance: This is what you need to know
Want a Security Clearance: This is what you need to know
Want a Security Clearance: This is what you need to know
Want a Security Clearance: This is what you need to know
Want a Security Clearance: This is what you need to know
Want a Security Clearance: This is what you need to know
Want a Security Clearance: This is what you need to know
Want a Security Clearance: This is what you need to know
Want a Security Clearance: This is what you need to know
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Want a Security Clearance: This is what you need to know

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Want a Security Clearance? This is what you need to know …

Want a Security Clearance? This is what you need to know

As you create your master plan for success, consider the variety of tools needed to gain a competitive edge in your industry. By familiarizing oneself with the extensive US Security Clearance Process, you can begin to prepare and access opportunities that help you excel. This workshop will guide you through the processing of getting and keeping a US security clearance. Further, we will explore the future and emerging career opportunities that require various clearance levels.

Learning Outcome: Increase knowledge and awareness around the US security Clearance process

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

a) Identify a series of career paths and associated tools to improve job marketability
b) List a series of certification and association options
c) Review the security clearance process and associated misconceptions and mistakes

Published in: Business, Technology
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  • Typical Technologies requiring restricted access:Aeronautics Systems TechnologyArmaments & Energetic Materials TechnologyBiological TechnologyBiomedical TechnologyChemical TechnologyDirected Energy Systems TechnologyEnergy Systems TechnologyElectronics TechnologyGround Systems TechnologyInformation Systems TechnologyLasers, Optics and Sensors TechnologyProcessing & Manufacturing TechnologyMarine Systems TechnologyMaterials and Processes TechnologyNuclear Systems TechnologyPositioning, Navigation and Time TechnologyInformation Security TechnologySignature Control TechnologySpace Systems TechnologyWeapons Effects Technology
  • When is a clearance terminated?A clearance is terminated when a person permanently leaves a position for which the clearance was granted. Cleared individuals who no longer require access to classified information, but who remain continuously employed by the same cleared contractor and do not anticipate future access can have their clearances administratively downgraded or withdrawn until such time that they require access again, provided their security investigation has not expired. Under such circumstances the clearance can be administratively restored.Can a clearance be reinstated after it has been terminated?Yes. If a person previously had a clearance and the investigation is still current, the clearance can be reinstated by the agency that originally granted the clearance or it can be accepted and granted by a different agency, provided there hasn’t been a break-in-service of two years or more. This usually only entails the submission of a new application and a favorable review of the application by the clearance granting authority.
  • To be sponsored you must be employed by a cleared contractor (or hired as a consultant) in a position that requires a clearance. As an exception, a candidate for employment may be submitted for a clearance if the cleared contractor has made a binding offer of employment and the candidate has accepted the offer. Both the offer and acceptance must be in writing. The offer of employment must indicate that employment will begin within 30 days of receiving the clearance.Why does it take so long to get a clearance?Part of the answer is that for over a decade insufficient resources have been allocated to clearance processing, causing a large backlog of cases. Most of the delays in getting a clearance are caused by either:• “queuing” time• poorly completed security applications• extended periods of residence outside the United States• serious security/suitability issues
  • While going through the clearance process, and after being granted a clearance, employees have certain reporting requirements. Some of those include: Criminal Activity of Any Kind Any Traffic Ticket Involving Alcohol or Drugs Excessive Indebtedness or Recurring Financial Difficulties (i.e., Bankruptcy, Wage Garnishments, Repossessions, Liens Against Personal Property for Failing to Pay Taxes, Significant Delinquency on Debts – 120 Days or More) Sudden, Unexplained Affluence Treatment for Mental or Emotional Disorders Change in Status (Name Change, Marital, etc.)dcriminal conviction resulting in incarceration for a period of one year or more• current unlawful use of or addiction to a controlled substance• determined to be mentally incompetent by a mental heath professional approved by DoD• discharge or dismissal from the Armed Forces under dishonorable conditions• unwillingness to surrender a foreign passport
  • Allegiance: threatened use of government violence, anti-constitutional, subversive groupsIT Misuse: illegal entry searching, modification, denial of access, sabotageMishandling: improper storage, discussion, NTK, actions, security compromisesOutside Activities: anti-US or foreign media, publishing, research, organizations relating to classified informationForeign Influence: contacts, foreign intelligence, relationships, relatives, associations, terrorists, subversivesForeign Preference: dual citizen, authorized foreign passport, foreign country or group commitment/conviction
  • Personal Status: Marriage, divorce, cohabitation, name change, inheritanceAlcohol: off/on work incidents, DUI, child/souse abuse, criminal, binging, impaired judgmentCriminal: theft, fraud, disregard of rules/regs, abuse/neglect, illegal activityDrug: use/possession, misuse prescription medsFinancial: beyond means, affluence, creditors, garnishments, support payments, gambling, bankruptcy, delinquency, etc.Conduct: poor judgment, irresponsible, unstable, falsification, associations, blackmail risk.Sexual: self-destructive/high-risk behavior, criminal sexual behaviorPersonality: depression, isolation, lying, suicidal, exploitive, stalking, threatening, combative.Social Networking: Questionable activity, poor judgment, unauthorized information.
  • Security Investigation Info:personal identifying dataresidence, education and employment history family and associates foreign connections/travel information about arrests illegal drug involvement financial delinquencies mental health counselingalcohol counselingmilitary serviceprior clearances civil court actions Subversive activities.While going through the clearance process, and after being granted a clearance, employees have certain reporting requirements. Some of those include: Criminal Activity of Any Kind Any Traffic Ticket Involving Alcohol or Drugs Excessive Indebtedness or Recurring Financial Difficulties (i.e., Bankruptcy, Wage Garnishments, Repossessions, Liens Against Personal Property for Failing to Pay Taxes, Significant Delinquency on Debts – 120 Days or More) Sudden, Unexplained Affluence Treatment for Mental or Emotional Disorders Change in Status (Name Change, Marital, etc.)d
  • Case Studies of Appealed DecisionsFinancial, Personal ConductApplicant accumulated 15 debts totaling $82,191. He demonstrated that he had paid, settled, or successfully disputed all of these debts. Furthermore, he retained the services of a credit counseling service and established a viable budget. He also retained an attorney to resolve one of his more difficult debts. Applicant also demonstrated that purported falsification concerns were unfounded. Eligibility for access to classified information is granted. CASE NO: 11-02781.h1
  • Case Studies of Appealed DecisionsFinancial; Personal Conduct; Criminal ConductApplicant is a 27-year-old employee of a defense contractor. He has an extensive history of criminal actions, traffic infractions, and irresponsible financial decisions. He appears to be headed in the right direction. However, he has not yet established a track record of responsible behavior sufficient to warrant a security clearance. Clearance is denied. CASE NO: 11-00168.h1
  • Foreign Influence; Foreign Preference; Personal ConductApplicant was born and educated in Morocco, came to the United States in 1999, applied for U.S. citizenship in 2004, and became a U.S. citizen in 2007. In 2004, he bought an apartment worth about $34,000 in Morocco for use by his mother. He married a citizen of Morocco in 2004, and she resides with him in the United States and intends to become a citizen. His mother, four brothers, father-in-law, and mother-in-law are citizens and residents of Morocco. He kept his Moroccan passport and national identity card after becoming a U.S. citizen, but he destroyed them when he learned that they raised security concerns. When he submitted his security clearance application, he failed to disclose two civil actions to which he was a party and some of his foreign travel, because he did not understand the questions. Clearance is granted. . CASE NO: 10-04378.h1
  • Case Studies of Appealed DecisionsFinancial; Personal ConductApplicant has seven delinquent debts totaling about $170,399. He has resolved two credit card debts and has credibly challenged the amount due on his delinquent mortgage. The other four debts are unresolved. He falsified his security clearance application by failing to disclose that he had delinquent debts that had been referred to collection agencies and credit cards that had been suspended for nonpayment. Clearance is denied
  • Any person who is employed by an organization that is sending, receiving, or developing information that the government has deemed as important to National security will need to obtain a security clearance. The object of the investigation process is to obtain a complete picture of you as an individual so that an adjudicator can determine whether you will be able to cope with having access to classified or sensitive information without becoming a security risk.Adjudicators look for honesty, trustworthiness, character, loyalty, financial responsibility and reliability.
  • Transcript

    • 1. WANT A SECURITY CLEARANCE? HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW! Michael J. Belzil, Security Director Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Palmdale, California
    • 2. Agenda • • • • • • Our Goal: Demystify the Mystical! Basics, Career Paths, Value Certification Process Pitfalls & How to Avoid Mistakes Case Studies BLUF: In most cases, “they” really don’t care what you’ve done, as long as you tell them!
    • 3. Security Clearance Basics • What is a Security Clearance? – Approval by the US government view classified information • Career Paths – Govt, Military, Defense/Bio/Tech Industry, etc. • Value – WIFM? – A security clearance can increase your salary $5,000 to $15,000
    • 4. More Basics • What are the security clearance levels? – Confidential – Secret – Top Secret • How long is it good for? – As long as needed; subject to periodic review – Reinvestigations: currently 15, 10 or 5 years for Confidential, Secret or Top Secret
    • 5. Certification Process • Sponsored by U.S. government or your company • Native born or naturalized US citizen • Application -> investigation -> approval • Processing time varies • 1-3 months for a CONFIDENTIAL clearance • 1-3 months for SECRET clearance • 4-8 months for a TOP SECRET clearance
    • 6. More Process • 3 steps to getting a security clearance – Apply via SF-86, verify citizenship, fingerprints • Answer questions truthfully and completely • Re-do delays processing – Background investigation • Interviews with you and your references – Review (adjudication) and approval
    • 7. Pitfalls to Retention • Professional – Allegiance to the United States (Disloyalty) – Misuse of Information Technology – Mishandling Protected Information – Outside Activities – Foreign Influence – Foreign Preference
    • 8. More Pitfalls • Personal – Change in Personal Status – Alcohol Consumption – Criminal Conduct – Drug Involvement – Financial Considerations – Conduct, Behavior, Disorders – Judgment, Social Networking
    • 9. Questions? Seminar Title
    • 10. Case Study #1 • Topic: Financial, Personal Conduct – 15 debts totaling $82,000 – All debts settled or successfully disputed – Sought credit counseling service and established a viable budget – Hired attorney to resolve a difficult debt • Should we grant or deny clearance?
    • 11. Case Study #2 • Topic: Financial, Personal, Criminal Conduct – 27-year-old employee of defense contractor – History of criminal actions, traffic infractions, irresponsible financial decisions. – Appears to be headed in the right direction, but has not yet established a track record of responsible behavior • Should we grant or deny clearance?
    • 12. Case Study #3 • Topic: Foreign Influence, Personal Conduct – – – – – Applicant born and educated in Morocco Came to the US in 1999 and became a U.S. citizen in 2007 In 2004, bought apartment for $34,000 in Morocco for his mother Married a Moroccan n 2004, she intends to become a US citizen Mother, 4 brothers, father-in-law, mother-in-law are citizens and residents of Morocco – Retained Moroccan passport after becoming a U.S. citizen; destroyed it when he learned it raised security concerns – On security clearance application, failed to disclose 2 civil actions and some of his foreign travel, because he did not understand the questions; answered truthfully during interview • Should we grant or deny clearance?
    • 13. Case Study #4 • Topic: Financial and Personal Conduct – 7 delinquent debts totaling $170,399 – Resolved 3 debts; 4 debts are unresolved – Falsified security clearance application, failing to disclose: delinquent debts, referral to collection agencies and suspended credit cards for nonpayment • Should we grant or deny clearance?
    • 14. Security Clearance Recap • Security clearance validates trust to protect classified information • Suitable for govt, defense, high tech, jobs • Certification after thorough investigation • Must maintain standards of conduct • Can be lost due to failure to self-report
    • 15. WANT A SECURITY CLEARANCE? HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW! Michael J. Belzil, Security Director Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Palmdale, California

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