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Creating Your Best Future! The 7 Habits of Successful Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Students
 

Creating Your Best Future! The 7 Habits of Successful Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Students

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Hang in there! You are somebody’s hope. There is a rumor mulling around ...

Hang in there! You are somebody’s hope. There is a rumor mulling around
in colleges across the land that science, technology, engineering, and
math are the “hardcore” fields that some advance, others try, and many
avoid. Women and minorities are grossly underrepresented in STEM
careers and the numbers continue to decline. In a 2010 Bayer Corp. survey
of 1,226 women and underrepresented minority chemists and chemical
engineers, 40 percent said they were discouraged from pursuing a STEM
career. Sixty percent said college was where most of the discouragement
happened. STEM careers offer a rewarding journey of innovation and
powerful contributions, solutions, and tools that secure and advance our
future. So, what do you need to do to overcome challenges and succeed
in these fields?
At the end of this workshop, college students will:
a. Explore STEM Stats and common reasons students get discouraged
b. Create a resource toolbox and networking plan to overcome challenges
c. Explore 7 key habits that can increase success
d. Examine the benefits and options of a great STEM Career Path

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    Creating Your Best Future! The 7 Habits of Successful Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Students Creating Your Best Future! The 7 Habits of Successful Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Students Presentation Transcript

    • October 11–13, 2012 Creating Your Best Future!The 7 Habits of Successful Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Students
    • Today’s Panel Moderator Kandice Cole Administrative Assistant for Director of Project UNITE, Tarrant NET Speaker 1 Mike MozingoMath Teacher & AVID Teacher/Coordinator Speaker 2 Sultan H. Cole Director of Project UNITE, Tarrant NET
    • Although women fill close to half of all jobs in the U.S. economy, they hold less than 25 percent of STEM jobs. This has been the case throughout the past decade, even as college- educated women have increased their share of the overall workforce. 100 80 52% 60 76% Men 40 WomenSource: Office of the Chief Economist.U.S. Department of Commerce,Economics and Statistics Administration. (2011). 20 48% Women in stem: A gender gap to innovation(ESA Issue Brief #04-11). Retrieved from website: 24% http://www.esa.doc.gov/Reports/women-stem-gender-gap-innovation 0 All jobs STEM jobs
    • • Women with STEM jobs earned 33 percent more than comparable women in non-STEM jobs – considerably higher than the STEM premium for men. As a result, the gender wage gap is smaller in STEM jobs than in non-STEM jobs.• Women hold a disproportionately low share of STEM undergraduate degrees, particularly in engineering.
    • • Women with a STEM degree are less likely than their male counterparts to work in a STEM occupation; they are more likely to work in education or healthcare. Male Female Female 2000 2009 2000 2009 2000 2009 STEM total 5,321 5,640 1,680 1,790 24% 24%Computer science and math 2,202 2,534 940 929 30% 27%Engineering 2,185 2,079 318 330 13% 14%Physical and life sciences 551 553 310 374 36% 40%STEM managers 382 474 111 157 23% 25%
    • Why STEM?In the next six years, more than a million jobs will open up that require specialized technology skills, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.But there won’t be enough qualified college graduates to fill them. That means job security and increased pay.
    • Why STEM?• According to a survey by Harris Interactive – – Forty-nine percent of female STEM students say it was to make a difference. – 61% of male students said that games or toys in their childhoods sparked their interest. – For 68% of the female respondents, a teacher or class got them interested in science, math, engineering or technology.
    • 7 Habits of Successful STEM Students• Habit 1: Do not wait for someone to tell you what to do. – Ask questions. – Make a plan. – Read. Read. Read.
    • 7 Habits of Successful STEM Students• Habit 2: Never lose sight of the goal. – Set goals for yourself. – Make a plan to reach those goals. – Stick to the plan.
    • 7 Habits of Successful STEM Students• Habit 3: Education Comes First – Set aside time in your calendar for study and do not violate it. – Find peers that can hold you accountable. – Remember why you are in school.
    • 7 Habits of Successful STEM Students• Habit 4: Form a study group. – Different perspectives and strategies are the key. – Give as much as you give. – Respect each others’ times.
    • 7 Habits of Successful STEM Students• Habit 5: Understand the concept and not just the solution. – Your homework, quiz or test is not the end goal. – If you do not understand why the answer is correct, you do not understand. – Concepts are transferable. Tricks are not.
    • 7 Habits of Successful STEM Students• Habit 6: Join professional and campus STEM organizations. – Find mentors in your future career. – Find peers that are on the same journey. – Get to know the professors from other fields.
    • 7 Habits of Successful STEM Students• Habit 7: Find balance. – Get involved in something artistic. – Find friends who are not in STEM majors. – Find time to relax, refuel, and refocus.