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Jumping Into the Deep End: CCCS' Success At Moving CTE Courses to Blended Courses
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Jumping Into the Deep End: CCCS' Success At Moving CTE Courses to Blended Courses

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Presentation given at the Sloan-C Blended Learning Conference in Denver Colorado on July 9, 2014

Presentation given at the Sloan-C Blended Learning Conference in Denver Colorado on July 9, 2014

Published in: Education, Business, Technology
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  • Opening the Gate:
    A Fast and Easy Way to Create, Collaborate, and Share Courses!
  • Why did CCCS decided to convert CTE energy courses to hybrid?
    Provide more opportunity for students to complete a certificate or degree
    Industry demands
    The TAACCCT1 grant required all COETC consortium members courses touched by the grant to be in online or hybrid format
  • CCCS-Colorado Online Energy Training Consortium members
    Our consortium had 16 colleges and we needed an cost efficient way to develop or revise 270 courses.

    Converting course to hybrid design had the same “bell curve” of the technology adoption curve:
    the early adopters eagerly submitted their courses whether they were “final editions” or rough drafts.

    As the website was built, more and more colleges, were peeking and willing to share. Instructors and institutions began to see similarities and differences and began contacting each other/other institutions for resources. That contact started a intrastate collaboration on course development, leading to several exemplary courses that are now being used system wide.
  • Success to Date
    Aug 2012- 15 courses in hybrid
    Dec 2014- approximately 270
  • Courses Now in Hybrid a sampling
    Aims Community College—Oil and Gas Technologies
    Pueblo Community College—Workforce Development in Mining and Extractive Technologies
    Colorado Mountain College—Solar Technology and Manufacturing Process Technologies
    Northeastern Junior College—Wind Energy
    Red Rocks Community College—Water Quality Management
  • Line Person
  • Solar and Process Technology
  • Water Quality Management
  • Oil and Gas Technology
  • Wind Energy
  • Situation Report Aug. 1 2013
    Only 15 out of 122 course had been converted to hybrid format
    Due date for all 122 courses to be in hybrid format Dec 2013
  • Why were we like a giraffe in a pool”?
    We didn’t know what needed to be done before full scale adoption
    Asking faculty to commit to a different teaching style
    At first, provided no training or resources to provide pedagogy or help for converting courses
    There was NO detailed plan to convert a F2F course to hybrid.
  • How Did WE Avoid “Drowning”
    Analyzed Certificates and Courses
    And Created Plan A
  • Plan A
    Analyzed Certificates and courses
    Identified courses in currently in hybrid status
    Selected:
    Courses in certificates with high enrollment
    F2F courses which could be “flipped”, delivered online, used simulations, and where authentic assessment was needed for certifications
    Courses that could be shared between colleges to maximize use of faculty time and reduce duplication of effort.
    Created a course development plan with benchmarks and deadlines
  • What supported Plan A?
    Faculty Out Reach
    Course Mapping
    “Chunking” the content
    Used competition between colleges as an incentive
    Publicized the success of grant hybrid courses in “what’s new in hybrid” email blasts
    Published courses to OER
    And used public “shaming” within the consortium
  • Faculty Outreach
    Info Graphic
    Sent out Hybrid InfoGraphic and a How to Manual
    Contacted each faculty developer taking a PN “positive or negative” reading on their course development
    Identified the “early adopters” of hybrid design or those faculty that were willing to try
    Built relationships with faculty willing to listen and try out new courses design
    Made site visits to helping faculty to redesign their courses
  • Course Mapping

    Course Competencies
    Module topics
    Measurable Objectives
    Content, Activities, Challenges
    Assessment, Rubrics
    Feedback
    Publish to OER

  • Chunk the Content

    When building the content:
    Create “snack-sized” appetizers of Content delivery
    Content
    Challenges and Activities
    Assessments
    Feedback
    Stack the appetizers into full sized modules
  • If Plan A wasn’t quite right for a college…gave them plan B
    An instructional designer worked onsite and through teleconferences with faculty to convert F2F courses to hybrid
    Returned to steps 2, 3, 4 and 5 of Plan A



  • Just when you thought it was safe in blended learning
  • Was OER a “Hard Sell”
    Yes
    Instructors who taught by the textbook didn’t want to change.
    Instructors who were willing to move to hybrid were reluctant to then “share” their courses
  • Challenges to Converting to Hybrid

    Technology
    Time
    Quality Assessment-Reluctance to “buy-in” that a hybrid course is as good or better than F2F
    Long standing belief that CTE courses are different because of Competency Based testing and industry certification
    Evolving Online/Hybrid Pedagogy
    Differing LMS’s
    Competency-based courses which only used industry supplied manuals for content delivery
  • What Worked Well?

    Detailed Plan
    Use of Instructional Designers
    Central website for easy access to all hybrid courses, www.cccscoetc.weebly.com
    Allocating enough time revise F2F content for hybrid delivery
    Detailed course mapping first to see when and where OER fits into an existing course
    Course mapping new courses to ensure all competencies are list to find appropriate OER
    Central URL repository for easy access to OER sites
    Central website for OER index
    Multimedia hosted on an institution channel or institutional account
    Allocating enough time to search & revise content
  • What did it Take for Buy in
    Instructional designers
    A specific “hybrid only” message”
    Recognition of impact across college departments and across the system
    Increased enrollment in certificate courses
  • Tools an OER Superhero Uses in this Grant

    CHAMP Dashboard
    http://www.symbaloo.com/shared/AAAACMSNVS0AA42Agd4JvQ==
    OPEN Courses:
    Merlot, Connexions, MIT OpenCourseWare, Open Yale Courses, Harvard Open Learning Initiative, Open Culture, Coursera, OpenCourseWare Consortium, MOOC List, edX, OpenCourse Library,
    Videos:
    YouTube, Vimeo or the Internet Archive
    Audio/Podcasts:
    Soundcloud or the Internet Archive
    Presentations:
    Slideshare
    OPEN Content:
    Google Drive
    Digital Public Library of America
    PhET
    P2PU
    OpenStax
    DOL OER or OPEN information
    http://open4us.org/faq/
    http://open4us.org/resources/cc-by-license-implementation-deep-dive-resources/
  • Open Educational Resources and Practices
    The Adoption of OER by One Community College Math Department
    OER Video   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wgqQdYKjIM http://www.iskme.org/category/tags/oer-research
    http://oer13.wordpress.com/2013/03/26/the-ecology-of-sharing-synthesizing-oer-research-rob-farrow/
    http://www.slideshare.net/robertfarrow/the-ecology-of-sharing-synthesizing-oer-research
    http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/1523/2652
    http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/jime/article/viewArticle/2013-04/html
  • Creative Commons Attribution

    This Workforce Solution created by Colorado Community College System COETC Grant is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. The material was created with funds from the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) Grant awarded to the Colorado Online Energy Training Consortium (COETC).Based on a work at www.cccs.edu.Permissions
  • Transcript

    • 1. CCCS’s Success at Moving CTE Courses to Blended Courses July 9, 2014 Presented by Brenda Perea Instructional Design Project Manager
    • 2. Provide more opportunity for students to complete a certificate or degree Industry demands The TAACCCT1 grant required all COETC consortium members courses touched by the grant to be in online or hybrid format
    • 3. EIC130 National Electrical Code I EIC225 Programmable Controllers ELT106 Fundamentals of DC/AC ELT112 Advanced DC/AC ENY121 Solar Photovoltaic Components PRO120 Process Tech 1- Equipment 1 PRO130 Instrumentation I PRO131 Instrumentation II PRO240 Industrial Troubleshooting Hydraulics I Hydraulics II Industrial Motors and Control Introduction and Intermediate PLC's MSHA Supplemental- Mine Safety and Health Admin Mechanical Components Welding ENY101 Introduction to Energy Technologies GIS101 Introduction to Global Information Systems MAN102 Business Ethics NRE214 Environmental Issues & Ethics PET101 Petroleum Fundamentals PRO120 Process Technology I: Equipment PRO130 Petroleum Fundamentals: Instrumentation PRO250 Oil and Gas Production I PSY150 Environmental Psychology EIC 101 Job Training and Safety EIC 175 Job and Climbing Safety ELT 106 Fundamentals of DC/AC ELT 107 Industrial Electronics IMA 160 Basic Fluid Power WTG 100 Introduction to Wind Industry WTG 110 Power & Control Systems WTG 210 Wind Turbine Airfoils & Composites
    • 4.  Only 15 out of 122 course had been converted to hybrid format  Due date for all 122 courses to be in hybrid format Dec 2013
    • 5.  We didn’t know what needed to be done before full scale adoption  Asking faculty to commit to a different teaching style  At first, provided no training or resources to provide pedagogy or help for converting courses  There was NO detailed plan to convert a F2F course to hybrid.
    • 6. Analyzed Certificates and courses Identified courses in currently in hybrid status Selected: Courses in certificates with high enrollment F2F courses which could be “flipped”, delivered online, used simulations, and where authentic assessment was needed for certifications Courses that could be shared between colleges to maximize use of faculty time and reduce duplication of effort. Created a course development plan with benchmarks and deadlines
    • 7. 1. Faculty Out Reach 2. Course Mapping 3. “Chunking” the content 4. Used competition between colleges as an incentive 5. Publicized the success of grant hybrid courses in “what’s new in hybrid” email blasts 6. Published courses to OER 7. And used public “shaming” within the consortium
    • 8. *When building the content: *Create “snack-sized” appetizers of Content delivery *Content *Challenges and Activities *Assessments *Feedback *Stack the appetizers into full sized modules
    • 9. 19 1. An instructional designer worked onsite and through teleconferences with faculty to convert F2F courses to hybrid 2. Returned to steps 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 of Plan A
    • 10. Technology and Time Quality Assessment-Reluctance to “buy-in” that a hybrid course is as good or better than F2F Long standing belief that CTE courses are different because of Competency Based testing and industry certification Evolving Online/Hybrid Pedagogy Differing LMS’s
    • 11. 23 Detailed Plan Use of Instructional Designers Detailed course mapping first to see when and where hybrid design would fit Central website for easy access to all hybrid courses, www.cccscoetc.weebly.com Allocating enough time revise F2F content for hybrid delivery
    • 12. Instructional designers A specific “hybrid only” message” Recognition of impact across college departments and across the system Increased enrollment in certificate courses
    • 13. Videos: YouTube, Vimeo or the Internet Archive Audio/Podcasts: Soundcloud or the Internet Archive Presentations: Slideshare, EverySlide OPEN Content: Google Drive Digital Public Library of America PhET P2PU OpenStax DOL OER or OPEN information http://open4us.org/faq/ http://open4us.org/resources/cc-by-license-implementation- deep-dive-resources/ OPEN Courses: Merlot, Connexions, MIT OpenCourseWare, Open Yale Courses, Harvard Open Learning Initiative, Open Culture, Coursera, OpenCourseWare Consortium, MOOC List, edX, OpenCourse Library, Hybrid Course info: CCCS InfoGraphic CCCS How to manual
    • 14. ► Open Educational Resources and Practices ► The Adoption of OER by One Community College Math Department ► OER Videos http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wgqQdYKjIM http://www.iskme.org/category/tags/oer-research ► http://oer13.wordpress.com/2013/03/26/the-ecology-of-sharing-synthesizing-oer-research-rob-farrow/ ► http://www.slideshare.net/robertfarrow/the-ecology-of-sharing-synthesizing-oer-research ► http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/1523/2652 ► http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/jime/article/viewArticle/2013-04/html
    • 15. This Workforce Solution presentation created by Brenda M. Perea of the Colorado Community College System COETC Grant is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. The material was created with funds from the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) Grant awarded to the Colorado Online Energy Training Consortium (COETC).Based on a work at www.cccs.edu.Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at www.cccs.edu. 27

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