VISUAL RESOURCES ASSOCIATION ENGAGING NEW TECHNOLOGIES II (2010)  SESSION II Moderator  (Betha Whitlow) Video  (Carolyn Ca...
VIDEO <ul><li>A Condensed History </li></ul><ul><li>Video in the Classroom </li></ul><ul><li>Beyond YouTube </li></ul><ul>...
Video
Video 1956
Video
Video 1967 1971
Video
Video
Video
Video
Video
Video
Video 2008 “ Video is Everywhere!” Time to Adopt: 1 year or less Educause and New Media Consortium Horizon Report
Video Video in the Classroom
Video Video in the Classroom
Video Finding Video =
Video Finding Video = X
Video blinkx.com
Video Meta Search
Video
Video
Video
Video pixsy.com
Video
Video
Video videosurf.com
Video Selecting Faces
Video
Video Share a Whole or just a Part
Video Editing and Sharing Video
Video masher.com
Video
Video
Video
Video
Video pixorial.com
Video
Video make scenes from uploaded clips
Video
Video make shows from your edited scenes
Video add transitions and titles
Video many ways to share and collaborate
Video jaycut.com
Video
Video Engaging Interdisciplinary Immersive  Interactive Visual  Collaborative
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  • Good afternoon, I’m Carolyn and I work for the Visual Resources Collection at Yale University. In my capacity at Technology Specialist for the VRC I serve as the primary training and instructional support person for the collection. In addition to giving one on one tutorials for faculty as well as teaching sessions for students about using digital images, I have been giving workshops about video production and editing to groups of faculty, graduate and undergraduate students. I have a background in video production and today I am going to talk to you about video—a little history, a little bit about video in the classroom today, and then on to the cool websites divided into finding videos and editing and sharing video online.
  • History of Video really begins in the early 1950s. And it begins with TV. (tv around since 30s)
  • And it really started with this guy on the left, Charles Ginsburg, who had a love affair with TV and led the research team at Ampex Corporation in developing the first practical videotape recorder (VTR) in the early 1950s. It captured live images from television cameras by converting the information into electrical impulses and saving the information onto magnetic tape. In 1956, CBS became the first network to employ VTR technology. http://www.invent.org/
  • And they (CBS) bought it for the large price tag of $50000. This is what it looked like—fairly enormous. Ginsburg became known as the &amp;quot;father of the video cassette recorder” But really it was video tape recorder-meaning reel-to-reel, open
  • About a decade later video technology becomes smaller, portable, and more affordable, putting it more into the hands of consumers. First introduced in 1967, the Portapak was the first portable video recording device. The first Portapak-type video recorder was the Sony CV-2400 Video Rover, which allowed a single person to record video in the field. Also, the start of when artists could start to use the medium of video. Video art, The first video cassette recorder, or what is popularly known as the VCR, was sold by Sony in 1971 Umatic. Its existence was made possible by the advances Ginsberg and his team made in the 1950s. It was among the first video formats to contain the videotape inside a cassette, as opposed to the various open-reel formats of the time. Different renditions as time went on, Metamax, etc. ¾” here. Different types of tape, VHS, Beta, etc. All this to say that the technology when it comes to video was always progressing to be put into the hands of consumers (watching at home and in school) and that consumers becoming producers of content.
  • Nam June Paik founding member of Fluxus. Paik was the first artist to use that, too. The day he got his hands on it (according to legend, he ran down to the docks to meet the shipment) happened to coincide with a papal visit to New York; Paik shot the pope&apos;s procession through the streets of the city and played the footage that night at the Café a Go-Go. From then on, not just the material of television, but its ability to generate original content, became available to anyone who wanted it.
  • Many of the early prominent video artists were those involved with concurrent movements in conceptual art, performance, and experimental film. Video Acconci Undertone 1972.
  • Joan Jonas 1972 Left Side Right Side
  • Martha Rolser Semiotics of the kitchen 1975.
  • Now Fast Forward (excuse the pun) 80s vhs (still analog here), Capture video to VHS, edit it on two decks, pop in a VHS to watch. minidv 90s (digital video, but recording medium still tape), introduction of non linear editing (computer) Still had to burn a DVD or watch on a single cumpter. No easy way to share over the web. hd camcorders recording to internal hard drives, flash drives, et (digital video). All about sharing video. Many small devices capture video now.
  • Even the ipod nano records video. Ok, so apart from consumers having easy access to capturing video, Something happens in the mid 200s (2004-2005). And I’ll let Michael Wesch, the renowned cultural anthropologist at Univeristy of Kansas explain in his speech to the Library of Congress in 2008. Gary Brolsma dancing to O-Zone. Posted in on his own site in 2004. By early 2005 YouTube was launched and it made it the first time everyone could easily share video and respod to it visually online thereby changing the landscape of video. The accessibility to video clips of just about anything to the ease with which one can make and post of video really has infiltrated higher education.
  • As Educause put out in their 2008 Horizon report, video is everywhere. Horizon report comes out every year and is meant to identify and describe technologies likely to have an impact on teaching and learning, “As the costs of production and distribution for video have dropped to nearly zero, many barriers to using in learning have fallen away… Identify 2 areas, #2 rather than investing in expensive infrastructure, some universities are using services like iTunes U to host video content for them from small segments on specific topics to full lectures. #2 With video easily produced on all manner of inexpensive devices, (ipod nano have cameras now) faculty have more options than ever before to incorporate video into their curricula.” As VR professionals, we are well equipped to be part of the conversation involving pedagogy and technology and visual content. I’ve found that more and more are including multimedia in their lectures-as jumping off points for discussion but also as texts for analysis—from simply inserting a movie clip into their PPT or just going to a video hosting site and playing the video live in class. I’ve also seen student video assignments are cropping up in humanities classes. Student video asssignments are highly immersive, interactive, is student centered, develops skills. At Yale there was no place for humanities (outside of the Arts which has their own separate facility for video) students and faculty to learn about video production and editing so the library was able to fill that service gap by offering workshops and coordinating with the ITG who had money for video cameras. I’ve taught about 8 workshops relating to video in the past year. Ok, now that the pedagogy is out of the way on to the fun stuff.
  • I’ve found that more and more are including multimedia in their lectures-as jumping off points for discussion but also as texts for analysis—from simply inserting a movie clip into their PPT or just going to a video hosting site and playing the video live in class. For instance, in Architecture classes, we know that video can really help students understand space, better than perhaps a still image. I’ve also seen student video assignments are cropping up in humanities classes. Student video assignments are highly immersive, interactive, is student centered, develops skills. At Yale there was no place for humanities (outside of the Arts which has their own separate facility for video) students and faculty to learn about video production and editing so the library was able to fill that service gap by offering workshops and coordinating with the ITG who had money for video cameras. I’ve taught about 8 workshops relating to video in the past year. Ok, now that the pedagogy is out of the way on to the fun stuff.
  • Before we get into finding video content on the web, just a quick note about video production and what I include on workshops for faculty and staff. There is a ton of info on the web, with get this video tutorials on how to shoot, how to edit, etc. Really quite easy to find info about it. But I love to talk about it,so you can come visit me at the tables after and I can show you some sites for information etc.
  • Now onto finding videos on the web. Back to Youtube—is great, BUT
  • It is not the queen of content. Here are a few other places to look for video clips. Finding current event videos can sometimes really relate to Archiecture if it hilights a new building ,etc. Also, these sites are good for videos about artists or even for contemporary living artists who are making work right now. Not famous rich artists, but more of the people. My artist friends love to upload their video to various sites. Faculty are becoming more comfortable moving between a still image presentation and using a video clip straight off the web.
  • Meta-video search engine. Commercial content, user generated video sites like YouTube.
  • Embeds video so aesthetically looks like part of blikx site.
  • No sign in, click to add videos to a playlist and share it via email or “wall it”
  • Visually presents the playlist and then can add that you a course website for example.
  • Also a meta search engine.
  • But the cool thing is it also looks for still images. Not always the best at finding images…. Or video for that matter b/c they ar relying on text. But there’s another site that utilizes a different search technology.
  • Not always the best at finding images…. Or video for that matter b/c they ar relying on text. But there’s another site that utilizes a different search technology.
  •   &amp;quot;Using a unique combination of new computer vision and fast computation methods, VideoSurf has taught computers to “see” inside videos to find content in a fast, efficient, and scalable way. Basing its search on visual identification, rather than text only, VideoSurf’s computer vision video search engine provides more relevant results and a better experience to let users find and discover the videos they really want to watch. With over 50 billion (and rapidly growing!) visual moments indexed from videos found across the web, VideoSurf allows consumers to visually navigate through their results to easily find the specific scenes, people or moments they most want to see
  • Search on warhol In results, can check mark “choose faces” and it will break out the time marker where faces are.
  • Don’t even need software anymore. Can edit online using free editors, but most computers have built in software to edit. Recommend those for larger projects.
  • VRA-Engaging Technology Video

    1. 1. VISUAL RESOURCES ASSOCIATION ENGAGING NEW TECHNOLOGIES II (2010) SESSION II Moderator (Betha Whitlow) Video (Carolyn Caizzi) Semantic Web (Greg Reser, Meghan Musolff) How to Keep Up (Betha Whitlow) Q&A and Fun Stuff (the group)
    2. 2. VIDEO <ul><li>A Condensed History </li></ul><ul><li>Video in the Classroom </li></ul><ul><li>Beyond YouTube </li></ul><ul><li>Editing and Sharing Video Online </li></ul>
    3. 3. Video
    4. 4. Video 1956
    5. 5. Video
    6. 6. Video 1967 1971
    7. 7. Video
    8. 8. Video
    9. 9. Video
    10. 10. Video
    11. 11. Video
    12. 12. Video
    13. 13. Video 2008 “ Video is Everywhere!” Time to Adopt: 1 year or less Educause and New Media Consortium Horizon Report
    14. 14. Video Video in the Classroom
    15. 15. Video Video in the Classroom
    16. 16. Video Finding Video =
    17. 17. Video Finding Video = X
    18. 18. Video blinkx.com
    19. 19. Video Meta Search
    20. 20. Video
    21. 21. Video
    22. 22. Video
    23. 23. Video pixsy.com
    24. 24. Video
    25. 25. Video
    26. 26. Video videosurf.com
    27. 27. Video Selecting Faces
    28. 28. Video
    29. 29. Video Share a Whole or just a Part
    30. 30. Video Editing and Sharing Video
    31. 31. Video masher.com
    32. 32. Video
    33. 33. Video
    34. 34. Video
    35. 35. Video
    36. 36. Video pixorial.com
    37. 37. Video
    38. 38. Video make scenes from uploaded clips
    39. 39. Video
    40. 40. Video make shows from your edited scenes
    41. 41. Video add transitions and titles
    42. 42. Video many ways to share and collaborate
    43. 43. Video jaycut.com
    44. 44. Video
    45. 45. Video Engaging Interdisciplinary Immersive Interactive Visual Collaborative

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