Where can Science Take YOU? (Talk for Henley High)
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Where can Science Take YOU? (Talk for Henley High)

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Henley High came to visit IPAS at Adelaide Uni and I gave a talk about the science and how you can end up doing all sorts of unexpected things!

Henley High came to visit IPAS at Adelaide Uni and I gave a talk about the science and how you can end up doing all sorts of unexpected things!

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  • At this stage most of you would be starting to think about what to do after school, eg Do I go to Uni?, What should I study? What Job will I get? I am here to talk about the possibilities that exist in the Sciences and about the various pathways you can follow – its not always apparent that’s for sure.
  • Googled “Famous Scientists” one of the website came up with this Many people have an image in mind when you say scientist, often its associated with someone who is super smart and a bit dorky or an old professor. But these days there are people of all ages, males and females, from all different countries making huge scientific breakthroughs. In addition many of these people have many other hobbies and interests on the side. The good thing about a science career is it can give the flexibility to do these other things as well. Marie Curie Pitchblende-ore from which uranium is extracted Radioactivity, two Noble Prizes in Physics and Chemsitry 1903, 1911 Neils Bohr Structure of the atom, Nobel Prize in Physics 1922 Albert Einstein Relativity, Photoelectric Effect, Nobel Prize in Physics 1921 Howard Florey PhD Cambridge, Extraction of Penicillin (first antibiotic), Nobel Prize 1945 PERSON OF THE 20 th CENTURY, TIME Magazine What do they all have in common? All dead
  • PhD’s all highly specific but look at how far reaching and broad their impact is now Prof. Tim Flannery Principal Research Scientist at the Australian Museum, Books: The Weather Makers, The future Eaters, PhD on the Evolution of Macropods Director of South Australian Museum Environmental advisor to the Australian Federal Parliament Australian of the Year 2007 NOAKES PhD (flinders) over 700 000 copi es sold in first two years of release Dr. Manny Noakes PhD on the effects of different fats on cholesterol metabolism CSIRO Total Well Being diet Advisory Panel member for the National Heart Foundation “tick” program Prof Ian Frazer Developed Cervical Cancer Vaccine Australian of the Year 2006 Dr Karl Degrees: Physics, Math and Biomed Engineering Writer of 26 books Member of the Order of Australia Award Recipient His website gets 700 000 pages downloaded each week
  • So with all those choices what to go for: Subject pre-requisites/entry timing 3 year degrees + optional 1 year honours* Named versus general TER, picking sensible back up choices and making sure you have explored alternative pathways
  • So you thought there was just “one” science????
  • Lots of choice – won’t go into all of them specifically Blue highlights our new degrees, touch on difference between general & named degrees
  • Being qualified with a degrees in these areas gives a number of career options later on. Slide is broken up into areas that are more “traditional” and “new pathways”. For each describe past and present options/re-surgence in some areas. Importance of pre-requisites Research pathways to be covered later Second pop up is the newer or dual career pathways after these degrees– many find successful careers being a specialist in these fields and often get jobs ahead of those with only their professional degree in these areas (Journalism is a great example). These can either be obtained by getting a job in the area/company or by studying double or second degrees in some instances.
  • Good resource for all jobs, recommend Google above all to students interested in looking at job prospects. Important to stress that job titles are broad, reflecting the broad areas discussed previously. Hence for science looking at the requirements is more important. Contacts & Networking – many scientists create their own roles by sending their CV into a company or organising a meeting to point out how they could meet needs.
  • Brings together research in water, soil, land and native flora & fauna. Sustainability Climate Change Dought Economic influencers
  • Brings together research in water, soil, land and native flora & fauna. Sustainability Climate Change Dought Economic influencers
  • At uni, there are areas of Science that you can choose to study that you may have not heard of before or had the chance to do.
  • Corri, Insert your gear here
  • Lets take a look at how scientific research really does impact on our lives with a couple of examples for Ag, food & wine. Starting at the cereal crop level, i.e. wheat & barley. Scientists can use breeding to enhance human health – eg enocuraging waxy characteristics so that bakers no longer need to add fat. Likewise they can use genetics to enhance crop quality, tolerance to stress (e.g. environmental) and resistance to diseases – again to keep crops up and make sure animals and us are getting what they need for a healthy diet. Biochemistry to look at make up, e.g. cell wall, to enhance nutritional value for foods – e.g. higher fibre, key nutrient release etc. On the Animal side, obviously they are a really important source of food. Ensuring their nutrition is high is also an important side of plant/crop science, however there are new and unique ways to improve their quality for human consumption. Deficiency in omega 3, responsible for birth defects, poor human health as adults etc. Boosting this very important in meat & fish. Meat, need to do it in a way that the chicken doesn’t taste like fish. Fish – now moving more and more to farming where they don’t maintain the same high level of omega 3 & hence need to look at conversion. Just two small eg’s of how the research in these schools interacts with real life – and hence real jobs in food companies, global industry, health departments, clinical studies to name only a few.
  • Being qualified with a degrees in these areas gives a number of career options later on. Slide is broken up into areas that are more “traditional” and “new pathways”. For each describe past and present options/re-surgence in some areas. Importance of pre-requisites Research pathways to be covered later Second pop up is the newer or dual career pathways after these degrees– many find successful careers being a specialist in these fields and often get jobs ahead of those with only their professional degree in these areas (Journalism is a great example). These can either be obtained by getting a job in the area/company or by studying double or second degrees in some instances.
  • We have found that less students are studying science and maths at school, this means that for those who do study these things, there will be greater opportunities as there will be a high demand for their skills. Recession Proof your career Chemistry – Basic skills for lab work Teaching- Maths, Physics and Chemistry IT- need maths Engineering and Engineering Science – maths, physics, chemistry Food production- molecular biology, chemistry Risky: Forensics- more graduates than jobs. Don’t have to make a choice right now, but DO have to keep your options open!
  • Apart from the serious side, the huge attraction of University is that it is a lot of fun, and you meet a lot of great people. Lots of sporting and other interest clubs (sports, performance, music etc), bars and cafes on campus, lots of areas to hang out on lawns with friends between lectures. Great social opportunities to meet new groups of friends who are like minded. At uni you have the chance to use cutting edge equipment and technologies – there are plenty of toys for grown ups! Lots of opportunities to participate in creative activities and learn things that will apply in day to day life.
  • 3 lectures / subject / week 1 tutorial / week or fortnight 1 prac / fortnight (field trips, lab placements etc ie different to school) Between classes, the time is your own to go shopping, have coffee, study – whatever you want!
  • Between classes, the time is your own to go shopping, have coffee, study – whatever you want!

Where can Science Take YOU? (Talk for Henley High) Where can Science Take YOU? (Talk for Henley High) Presentation Transcript

  • Life Impact The University of Adelaide Where can Science take YOU? Corri Baker BSc (Hons) Chemistry PhD Candidate
  • Neils Bohr Albert Einstein Howard Florey Marie Curie
  • Today’s Scientists Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • Degree considerations Life Impact The University of Adelaide
    • General degrees
      • Bachelor of Science
      • Broad & Flexible, later specialisation
    • Named degrees
      • Examples: Biotechnology, Natural Resources
      • Early specialisation & compulsory subjects
  • Different Sciences Life Impact The University of Adelaide Veterinary Science Agriculture, Food & Wine Chemistry & Physics Earth & Environmental Sciences Molecular & Biomedical Science
  • Choices in Science...Heaps!
      • Agricultural Sciences
      • Animal Science
      • Biomedical Science
      • Biotechnology
      • EcoChemistry
      • Evolutionary Biology
      • Optics & Photonics
      • High Performance
      • -Computational Physics
      • Petroleum Geoscience
      • Space Science & Astrophysics
      • Marine Biology
      • Mineral Geoscience
      • Molecular & Drug Design
      • Molecular Biology
    • Nanoscience & Materials
    • Food and Nutrition Science
    • Oenology & Viticulture
    • Natural Resources
    • Wine Marketing
    • Veterinary Science
    Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • Life Impact The University of Adelaide SCIENCE DEGREE: Media & Science Comm. Management & Business Politics & Consultancy Scientific Law & Patents Policy, Projects & Administrative Related jobs Science jobs
    • What does a scientist do? Just about anything!
      • Job titles are varied
      • Job title rarely exactly the same as name of degree
      • Often don’t get jobs from ads, but hear about jobs through contacts and networking or get head hunted!
    Jobs in Science Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • Life Impact The University of Adelaide Program Options Bachelor of Science Optics & Photonics High Perf. Comp Physics MBS Programs Chemistry Programs
  • Life Impact The University of Adelaide Jobs in Science Program Options Natural Resources Bachelor of Science Marine Biology Evolutionary Biology EcoChemistry
  • Life Impact The University of Adelaide Our Graduates & Pathways Heidi Bartram BSc (Hons) Policy Officer, Fisheries Division, PIRSA Manages aquarium fish trade & emergency response to pests & disease. Program Options Marine Biology Bachelor of Science Pre-Veterinary Natural resources
  • Life Impact The University of Adelaide Our Graduates & Pathways Rebecca Kelley, BSc (Biotech.)(Hons) Research Assistant, Cambridge Uni, UK Researches genetic mutations and occurrence and development of diseases in bone marrow Program Options Biotechnology Biomedical Science Molecular Biology Bachelor of Science
  • Some new Sciences
    • Natural Resources
    • Animal Science (Vet?)
    • Agriculture
    • Food Science
    • Geology
    • Petroleum Geoscience
    • Viticulture / Oenology
    • Marine Biology
  • My Story Life Impact The University of Adelaide Zinc Zinc in cells
  • Agriculture, Food & Nutrition Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • Life Impact The University of Adelaide Research/Science Jobs: Principal Scientist Lecturer Research Scientist Dean/Professor Post Doctoral Scientist/Fellow Masters, PhD Bachelor, Honours Laboratory Manager Technical Assistant
  • Life Impact The University of Adelaide Research pathways Mark Sosnowski B Ag Sci (Hons), PhD Research Scientist, SARDI Researches grapevine disease & management options to optimise wine quality. Also researches biosecurity risks. Program Options Viticulture & Oenology Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Agricultural Sciences Biotechnology (Microbiology & Virology)
    • Don’t believe the stereotypes!
    • Stick at your Maths and Science subjects – it pays off!
    • Your Yr 12 TER isn’t everything
    • You can find a type of science that interests YOU!!
    Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • Why University? Life Impact The University of Adelaide
    • Fun (way more than school)
    • You meet a lot of new people
    • Use your creativity
    • Real life applications
    • You use new equipment and
    • technologies
    Also..…
    • Lectures
    • Tutorials
    • Practicals
    Classes at Uni
  • Between Classes…… Life Impact The University of Adelaide
    • Meet friends for lunch
    • Go shopping in mall
    • Field trips
    • Gigs
  • For more information…..
    • Web address:
      • www.sciences.adelaide.edu.au
    • Faculty of Sciences:
      • +(61 8) 8303 5673
      • [email_address]
    Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • Connect!
    • cbsquared
    • cbsquared _
    Life Impact The University of Adelaide