The Three Googles: How I Teach Google in an Academic Setting

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Brown, Christopher C. “The Three Googles: How I Teach Google in an Academic Setting.” Presentation given at the CoALA Spring Workshop, 10 May 2013, online.

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The Three Googles: How I Teach Google in an Academic Setting

  1. 1. THE THREE GOOGLESHOW I TEACH GOOGLE IN AN ACADEMIC SETTINGPRESENTATION GIVEN TO COLORADO ACADEMIC LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, 10 MAY2013, ONLINEChristopher C. BrownReference Librarian
  2. 2. OVERVIEW OF THE THREE GOOGLESOVERLAPPING AT TIMESGW GSGBNote: this chart does not represent the actual Google architecture. It shows that different features areforegrounded in different environments.
  3. 3. GOOGLE WEB: HOW TO LEVERAGE IT FORACADEMIC PURPOSES Primary source materials (government documents,international materials, technical reports, companypolicies, etc.) Locating these with site-specific searching (domainsearching; TLD searching)Examples:site:gov.ng domestic staffingsite:state.gov country reports human rightssite:undp.org development indicators climate changesite:state.co.us marijuana regulation filetype:pdfsite:gob.mx water statistics filetype:pdf
  4. 4. TLDS: TOP-LEVEL DOMAINS Google Web is most effectivelysearched when you can restrictsearching to a top-level domain(like .edu, .gov, .jp) To discover all the TLDs forcountries, type TLD in a Googlesearch box.
  5. 5. GOOGLE WEB SEARCH EXAMPLE
  6. 6. GOOGLE SCHOLAR
  7. 7. GOOGLE SCHOLAR CONTENTPublisher-supplied indexingand full text contentLibrary-supplied journalholdings. Every online journalsubscription from everypublisher and aggregatorGS
  8. 8. FEATURES OF GOOGLE SCHOLAR
  9. 9. WHAT’S IN GOOGLE SCHOLAR? Google isn’t saying –so they leave it up tous to figure it out.http://libguides.du.edu/content.php?pid=86031&sid=639860
  10. 10. GOOGLE SCHOLAR SETTINGShttp://libguides.du.edu/Scholar
  11. 11. GOOGLE BOOKS
  12. 12. GOOGLE BOOKS: BACKGROUND Where do all these books come from? Partner Program – publishers and authors make theirworks more discoverable Library Project: Austrian National Library; BavarianState Library; Columbia University; Committee onInstitutional Cooperation (CIC); Harvard University;Cornell University Library; Ghent University Library;Keio University Library; Lyon Municipal Library;University of California; The National Library ofCatalonia; The New York Public Library; OxfordUniversity; Princeton University; Stanford University;University Complutense of Madrid; University Library ofLausanne; University of Virginia; University of Texas atAustin; University of Wisconsin - Madison; University ofMichigan
  13. 13. GOOGLE BOOKS VIEWS Full View – if in public domain may be able to download PDF Limited Preview – publisher has given permission for preview ofup to 20% or work Snippet View – shows a few snippets that match search terms No Preview – only basic information; sometimes not able tosearch full textFrom:http://books.google.com/intl/en/googlebooks/library/
  14. 14. GOOGLE BOOKS AND HATHITRUST http://books.google.com/intl/en/googlebooks/about/history.html http://www.hathitrust.org/partnershipGBHTThere are materials thatare in GB that are not inHT, and vice versa
  15. 15. SOMETIMES EASIER TO USE HT THAN GB Annual Report on Introduction of Domestic Reindeer Into Alaska
  16. 16. FEATURE DIFFERENCESGoogle Web Google Scholar Google BooksVery little useablemetadataExtensive metadataprovided by publishersExtensive metadataprovided by OCLCNo ability to citeresourcesCitations can bedisplayed (APA, MLA,Chicago) andexportedExport citations only inselected formats-- Links to subscribedlibrary contentLinks to libraryholdings andbookstore salesFacets for date limits Limit by century orcustom date range
  17. 17. THE THREE GOOGLES: SUMMARYGW GSGBPrimarysourcematerialsAcademic,scholarly journalarticlesFull text ofbooksDiscovery +FulfillmentDiscovery +FulfillmentDiscovery Only
  18. 18. THE INFORMATION ACCESS ANOMALYBook (average)Journal Article(average)Google(Scholar/Books)Typical Length -full text (FT)200 pages x 400 =80,000 words15 pages x 400 = 6,000wordsSurrogate Record(SR)50-100 words (75ave.)300-500 words (400ave. 1)SR to FT ratio 1 to 10,666 1 to 15 1 to 11 http://www.writersservices.com/wps/p_word_count.htmWhat this chart means: even though University of Denver owns over1.5 million books, students have the feeling that we don’t own anybooks on their topics.
  19. 19. A FOURTH GOOGLEGOOGLE NEWS NO LONGER HAS ARCHIVE SEARCH http://news.google.com/archivesearch
  20. 20. QUESTIONS? Contact Chris Brown: Christopher.Brown@du.edu

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