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Baroque Italy and Spain
 

Baroque Italy and Spain

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    Baroque Italy and Spain Baroque Italy and Spain Presentation Transcript

    • Chapter 24Italy and Spain 1600 – 1700 Baroque Art
    • Europe in the 17th Century
    • Figure 24-2 CARLOMADERNO, SantaSusanna, Rome, Italy, 1597–1603
    • Figure 24-2 CARLO MADERNO, Santa Susanna, Rome, Italy, 1597–1603.
    • GIACOMO DELLA PORTA, facade of IlGesù, Rome, Italy, ca. 1575–1584.
    • Figure 24-3 CARLO MADERNO, facade of Saint Peter’s, Vatican City, Rome, Italy, 1606–1612.
    • Figure 24-3 CARLO MADERNO, facade of Saint Peter’s, Vatican City, Rome, Italy, 1606–1612.
    • Figure 24-3 CARLO MADERNO, facade of Saint Peter’s, Vatican City, Rome, Italy, 1606–1612.
    • CARLO MADERNO, plan of Saint Peter’s, Vatican City, Rome, Italy, with adjoining piazza designed by GIANLORENZO BERNINI.
    • BramanteMichelangelo
    • Figure 24-4 Gianlorenzo Bernini, Aerial view of Saint Peter’s, Vatican City, Rome, Italy, 1506–1666.
    • Figure 24-5 GIANLORENZOBERNINI, baldacchino, SaintPeter’s, Vatican City, Rome, Italy, 1624–1633. Gilded bronze, approx. 100’ high.
    • Figure 24-5 GIANLORENZOBERNINI, baldacchino, Saint Peter’s, Vatican City, Rome, Italy, 1624–1633. Gilded bronze, approx. 100’ high.
    • Figure 24-7 GIANLORENZO BERNINI, David, 1623.Marble, approx. 5’ 7‖ high. Galleria Borghese, Rome.
    • MYRON, Diskobolos (Discus Thrower). Roman marble copy after a bronze original of ca. 450 BCE, 5’ 1‖ high.Museo Nazionale Romano—Palazzo Massimo alle Terme.
    • Figure 24-9 GIANLORENZO BERNINI, Ecstasy of Saint Teresa, Cornaro Chapel, Santa Maria dellaVittoria, Rome, Italy, 1645–1652. Marble, height of group 11’ 6‖.
    • Figure 24-9 FRANCESCO BORROMINI, facade of San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane, Rome, Italy, 1665–1676.
    • Figure 24-2 CARLO MADERNO, SantaSusanna, Rome, Italy, 1597–1603
    • Figure 24-10 , 11FRANCESCO BORROMINI, plan and dome of San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane, Rome, Italy, 1638–1641.
    • Figure 24-18 CARAVAGGIO, Calling of Saint Matthew, Contarelli Chapel, San Luigi dei Francesi, Rome, Italy, ca. 1597– 1601. Oil on canvas, 11’ 1‖ x 11’ 5‖.
    • Naturalism Tenebrism (tenebroso)Figure 24-17 CARAVAGGIO, Conversion of Saint Paul, Cerasi Chapel, Santa Maria del Popolo, Rome, Italy, ca. 1601. Oil on canvas, approx. 7’ 6‖ x 5’ 9‖.
    • Figure 24-19 CARAVAGGIO, Entombment, from the chapel of Pietro Vittrice, Santa Maria inVallicella, Rome, Italy, ca. 1603. Oil on canvas, 9’ 10 1/8‖ x 6’ 7 15/16‖. Musei Vaticani, Pinacoteca, Rome.
    • ROGIER VAN DER WEYDEN, Deposition, from Notre-Dame hors-les-murs, Louvain, Belgium, ca. 1435. Oil on wood, approx. 7’ 3" x 8’ 7". Museo del Prado, Madrid.
    • Figure 24-20 ARTEMISIA GENTILESCHI, Judith Slaying Holofernes, ca. 1614–1620. Oil oncanvas, 6’ 6 1/3‖ x 5’ 4‖. Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence.
    • Quadro riportato – a ceiling painting in which painted scenes resemble framed figures transferred to a curved ceiling. Figure 24-16 ANNIBALECARRACCI, Loves of the Gods, ceiling frescoes in the gallery, Palazzo Farnese, Rome, Italy, 1597–1601.
    • Figure 24-21 GUIDO RENI, Aurora, ceiling fresco in the Casino Rospigliosi, Rome, Italy, 1613–1614. quadro reportato – simulates a framed easel painting on the ceiling
    • Di sotto in su – illusionistic architecturalpainting aimed at extending realarchitecture into imaginary space ―from thebottom up.‖ Figure 24-22 PIETRO DA CORTONA, Triumph of theBarberini, ceiling fresco in the Gran Salone, PalazzoBarberini, Rome, Italy, 1633–1639.
    • Figure 24-23 GIOVANNI BATTISTAGAULLI, Triumph of the Name of Jesus, ceiling fresco with stucco figures in the vault of the Church of Il Gesù, Rome, Italy, 1676–1679.
    • Figure 24-24 FRA ANDREA POZZO, Glorification of Saint Ignatius, ceiling fresco in the nave of Sant’Ignazio, Rome, Italy, 1691–1694.
    • Italian Baroque•Establishment of trade routes, Europe becomessecularized•The importance of the Catholic church incommissioning art for the purpose of exerting theirpower and authority and encouraging a return to theChurch – Saint Peter’s•Bernini’s work in architecture and sculpture—innovations, use of materials, emotional impact•The interest in creating drama in art -- strong light anddark contrast (tenebrism,) dynamiccompositions, movement, and emotion•Caravaggio’s innovative portrayal of religious subjectand his influence on other artists•Gentileschi – her graphic and powerful religiouspaintings•Ceiling paintings as a means to glorify the church –their stylistic characteristics
    • Spain1600 – 1700 Baroque Art
    • Figure 24-26 FRANCISCO DEZURBARÁN, Saint Serapion, 1628. Oil on canvas, 3’ 11 1/2‖ x 3’ 4 3/4‖. Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford (The Ella Gallup Sumner and Mary Catlin Sumner Collection Fund).
    • Figure 24-27 DIEGO VELÁZQUEZ, WaterCarrier of Seville, ca. 1619. Oil on canvas, 3’ 51/2‖ x 2’ 7 1/2‖. Wellington Museum, London.
    • Figure 24-30 DIEGO VELÁZQUEZ, LasMeninas (The Maids of Honor), 1656. Oilon canvas, approx. 10’ 5‖ x 9’. Museo del Prado, Madrid.
    • Figure 24-30 DIEGO VELÁZQUEZ, LasMeninas (The Maids of Honor), 1656. Oilon canvas, approx. 10’ 5‖ x 9’. Museo del Prado, Madrid.
    • Figure 20-13 JAN VAN EYCK, Giovanni Arnolfini and HisBride, 1434. Oil on wood, approx. 2’ 8" x 1’ 11 1/2". National Gallery, London.
    • Figure 24-29 DIEGO VELÁZQUEZ, Surrender of Breda, 1634–1635. Oil on canvas, 10’ 1‖ x 12’ 1/2‖. Museo del Prado, Madrid.
    • Figure 24-28 DIEGO VELÁZQUEZ, KingPhilip IV of Spain (Fraga Philip), 1644. Oil on canvas, 4’ 3 1/8‖ x 3’ 3 1/8‖. The Frick Collection, New York.
    • Baroque in Spain•Dramatic paintings illustrating the martyrdom of saints- style ofCaravaggio•Velazquez’s paintings of royalty in genre-like scenes, innovative brushwork, complex spatial construction (compare to HighRenaissance, Caravaggio) End of Chapter 24