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JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen  knudsen updated april 1 2010
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JCEP workshop creating aging friendly communities barber jensen knudsen updated april 1 2010

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  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: (Make introductions) We represent a team of UW Extension family living educators dedicated to disseminating educational programs addressing the needs of Wisconsin’s aging population and their families. Our over-arching goal is to promote the creation of aging-friendly communities.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: The primary focus of our presentation is on the question: How prepared is your community for the coming “age wave”? The term “age wave” describes the significant increase in the older population as a result of the aging of the “Baby Boom” generation; that is, those born between 1946 and 1964. You may also have heard this referred to as the “silver tsunami”. The image of a crashing wave is intended to foster serious reflection on the extent to which communities in Wisconsin are “aging-ready”. Our goal is to encourage both individual and collective action to make communities in Wisconsin more aging-friendly.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: The presentation is organized into three parts. Part 1 is designed to illustrate why creating aging-friendly communities important. Specifically, we will share information on the population aging. The presentation of demographic data can, at times, be a bit “dry”. We hope such is not the case. After illustrating examples of population aging at the global, national, state, and county levels, Part 2 explores – with your help - the impacts of population aging, particularly at the local (county/community) level; since that is where the everyday lives of people are lived. The third and final part of the presentation focuses on attributes of aging-friendly communities, and is designed to promote discussion regarding your role in creating such communities.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Before we discuss the aging of populations, perhaps it will be useful to briefly talk about the aging of individuals…a phenomenon with which all of us are familiar. Whether we like it or not (or whether we admit it or not), all of us are aging.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: How is the aging of individuals measured? Perhaps the most common means is chronological – number of years since birth (number of candles on the cake). But aging can also be measured in biological, psychological, social, and functional terms as well…and even subjectively (how old do you feel?). As an example of a measure of biological aging, hold your hand out flat with the palm facing down. Now gently pull up the skin on the top of you hand; just behind your knuckles. Let go. For an older person whose skin has aged due to unprotected and prolonged exposure to sunlight, the loss of elasticity (the cross-linking of collagen molecules), the skin that was pulled up remains. For a younger person, the pulled up skin returns immediately to its original shape. SOURCE INFORMATION: One reference with regard to the aging of skin: Calleja-Agius, J., Muscat-Baron, Y., & Brincat, M. P. (2007). Skin ageing. Menopause International , 13, 60-64.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Just as the aging of individuals can be measured – say, using years since birth – so, too, can the aging of entire populations (i.e. groups of people living in a given geographical area). But the means of measuring the aging of populations are different. SUGGESTIONS FOR AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION: Before showing the next slide, you may want to ask participants for suggestions on ways they thing that the aging of a population can be measured.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: This slide lists several indicators of population aging. You may have seen one or more of these mentioned in the news media. The first three are probably the most commonly used. The measure is less commonly used, but is a useful an indicator of how fast a population is aging. The baseline here is that 7% of a population is age 65 or older. And the measure of how fast a population is aging is focused on how many years will it take until 14% of the population is age 65 or older. NOTES: The median age of a population is the age that divides a population into two numerically equal groups; that is, half the people are younger than this age and half are older. It is a single index that summarizes the age distribution of a population.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: A population pyramid is a common way of illustrating the distribution of various age groups in a population (e.g. a country or region) which normally forms the shape of a pyramid. A population pyramid typically consists of two back-to-back, horizontal bar graphs, with the population plotted on the X-axis and age on the Y-axis, one showing the number of males (and one showing females (usually on the right) in a particular population, generally in five-year age groups (e.g. 65-69). Males are conventionally shown on the left and females on the right, and they may be measured by raw number or as a percentage of the of the total population.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Here are three population pyramids for Japan at three points in time: 1950 on the left, 2008 in the middle, and 2050 on the right. The changing shape illustrates the aging of the population (from younger to older). SUGGESTION FOR AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION: There are several factors that influence the shape of a pyramid…including it changing shape over time. One is birth rate, or number of babies born in a given year or set of years. Can you think of other factors that would affect the shape of a population pyramid? Tease out: mortality rate (longevity or average life expectancy), and immigration rate. Younger populations are those with a higher birth rate coupled with a fairly high mortality rate…. will have a regular “pyramid” shape – broader base. Older populations are those with a relatively low birth rate coupled with lower mortality rates…will be an “upside down” pyramid. NOTES ON HYPERLINKS: Clicking on the image on this slide is hyperlink to the source page: http://ayrshiregeog.blogspot.com/2007/09/elderly-people-in-japan-problem-or.html Clicking on the underlined word, “population” , will take you to a website that illustrates that the dynamic change in shape of a population pyramid over time using data from Canada. OTHER: Analogy (optional): The shape of a population pyramid is constantly changing. It’s like holding a snake by the tail and having it eat mice or rats of different sizes who are scurrying around on the floor. Swallowing a small mouse would represent a time when the birthrate if fairly low. This might be followed by swallowing a fairly large rat; symbolizing a significant increase in birth rate. The overall shape of the snake would be one of bulges and dips; depending on the size of the mouse or rat that was eaten; and the rate at which it was digested. I realize this may be a pretty “gross” analogy, but I doubt you will forget it when you think of the changing shape of population pyramids.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: With different ways of measuring population aging in mind – and with an understanding of how population pyramids can be used to illustrate population aging – we turn now to examining population aging: For this presentation, we will share information on population aging from four perpsectives: global, national, state (Wisconsin), and county. NOTES: This presentation can be shortened by eliminating one or more of these perspectives.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Many people are aware that the population in the United States is growing older. What is sometimes overlooked is that populations worldwide are also aging.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Within the next 10 years, for the first time in human history.... (pause before moving to next slide)
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: ..the percentage (and number) of persons age 65+ in the world with be greater than those age 5 and younger. For many persons, this is surprising…even shocking. Think of the implications of a world in which there are – for the first time ever – more older than younger people. As you can see from this line graph, the percentage of children age 5 and younger has been declining at the same time that the percentage of persons age 65+ has been increasing. Although the percentage of those age 5 and younger is currently higher, it is projected this will change sometime before 2020. NOTES ON HYPERLINKS: Clicking on the graph is a hyperlink to the 2007 report from which this graph was taken: Why Population Aging Matters: A Global Perspective . http://www.nia.nih.gov/NR/rdonlyres/9E91407E-CFE8-4903-9875-D5AA75BD1D50/0/WPAM_finalpdftorose3_9.pdf
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Within the past few years, there has been a significant increase an awareness of issues related to global aging. This slide shows only a few reports, magazines, book, and monographs published on this topic. SUGGESTION FOR AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION: Ask how many have recently read or seen a newspaper article, magazine cover, or book focused on the topic of global aging.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: The term, “global aging” is an interesting term. What does it mean? One response to this question is found in the fact that for most of human history, until about a century ago, the elderly (defined here as people aged 65 and over) never amounted to more than 2 or 3% of the total population.  In the developed world today they amount to 15%. And by the year 2030, they will be around 25%...1 in every 4 people! The bar graph in this slide– taken from a 2008 international population report, “An Aging World” - shows percentage of persons age 65+ in the world’s 25 oldest countries, all of which are considered part of the “developed” world. Notice that Japan heads the list..at nearly 22 percent of its population age 65+. By comparison to these “top 25”, the U.S. is a fairly “young” developed country, and is ranked 41 st (at a little over 13% of the population age 65+) out of 224 countries. NOTE ON HYPERLINK: Clicking on the report image accesses the report (“An Aging World: 2008”…in pdf format) from which this graph (and the ones in the two succeeding slides) were taken: http://www.census.gov/prod/2009pubs/p95-09-1.pdf
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Recall that one measure of population aging is median age (the age that equally divides the population into younger and older groups). On this slide and the next – again, taken from the 2008 international population aging report – are bar graphs showing the projected change in median age (from 2008 to 2040) for 12 countries: 6 “developed” countries (this slide: Australia, Germany, Greece, Japan, United Kingdon, and the United States) and 6 “developing” countries (next slide: Brazil, China, Mexico, Pakistan, South Africa, and Uganda). By the year 2030, the median age of the entire developed world is projected to be 45.  In Japan and much of southern and eastern Europe, it will be over 50.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Also using median age as a measure of population aging, here is a graph showing projected change from 2008 to 2040 for developing countries. As a whole, the developing world will remain much younger (than developed countries) for the foreseeable future.  But developing countries, too, are aging—hence the term "global aging.”
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: We shift now from a global perspective of aging populations to a focus on aging in the United States. Does anyone know the number and percentage of persons in this country who are age 65+ or older? (toss candy to reward those who volunteer responses) Answers: Currently, there are approximately 40 million Americans age 65 and older; representing a little more than 13% of the total population. A good source of information on older Americans is the Administration on Aging website ( http://www.aoa.gov/AoARoot/Aging_Statistics/Profile/index.aspx) . A few of the graphs in the next few slides were taken from the Administration on Aging website. NOTES ON HYPERLINKS: Clicking on the image of the continental US map is a hyperlink to the Administration on Aging (AoA) site: Profile of Older Americans: 2009 http://www.aoa.gov/AoARoot/Aging_Statistics/Profile/index.aspx
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: One of the great success stories of public health is the significant increase in life expectancy. From 1900 through 2003, life expectancy at birth increased from 48 to 75 years for men and from 51 to 80 years for women. Life expectancy at age 65 has also increased since the beginning of the 20th century. Among men, life expectancy at age 65 rose from 12 to 17 years and among women from 12 to 20 years. In contrast to life expectancy at birth, which increased sharply early in the 20 th century, life expectancy at age 65 improved primarily after mid-century. Improved access to health care, advances in medicine, healthier lifestyles, and better health before age 65 are factors underlying decreased death rates among older Americans. This line graph shows the increases in life expectancy at birth from 1900 to 2003. For women, 30 years have been added to the average length of life (from 51 to 80); for men, the gain has been 28 years (from 48 to 75). Over the same period of time, there have also been increases in life expectancy for those who reach the age of 65….about 20 more years for women, and 15 or so more years for men. SOURCE NOTES: Data in this graph are from a National Center for Health Statistics Report: Health, United States, 2006: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus06.pdf More recent data (broken down by race and gender) are available in a 2009 report, but these data do not include trends from 1900. The 2009 report can be accessed at: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus09.pdf In an optional handout, You may want to include information on online life expectancy calculators. Using the online tools, participants can calculate their own life expectancy and compare it with the data in this chart. Examples of free online life expectancy calculators: Boston University School of Medicine: http://www.bumc.bu.edu/centenarian/the-living-to-100-life-expectancy-calculator/ Microsoft Network (MSN): http://moneycentral.msn.com/investor/calcs/n_expect/main.asp
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: The increase in life expectancy has significantly impacted one common measure of population aging: The number of persons age 65+. As can be seen from the graph in Figure 1 in this slide, in 1900, there were only 3 million Americans age 65+. Today there are 40 million, and by the year 2030 there will be 72 million. Notice the significant jump in numbers between 2010 and 2020…that is the Baby Boom generation crossing the age 65 threshold. NOTE ON HYPERLINK: Clicking on the bar graph image is a hyperlink to the AoA Profile of Older Americans site: http://www.aoa.gov/AoARoot/Aging_Statistics/Profile/2008/4.aspx
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: This line graph from the 2008 report on Older Americans illustrates that – although there has been an increasing number of older persons since 1900 - there will a significant increase beginning in 2011 when the Baby Boom generation begins to turn 65…the beginning of the “age wave”….and a corresponding rise in the number of persons turning 85 twenty years later. NOTES ON HYPERLINKS/SOURCES: Clicking on the graph image is a hyperlink to the source: http://www.agingstats.gov/agingstatsdotnet/Main_Site/Data/2008_Documents/Population.pdf The entire 2008 Chartbook can be accessed by clicking the hyperlink with the report cover image: http://www.agingstats.gov/agingstatsdotnet/main_site/default.aspx
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Not only has the actual number of persons age 65+ in the United States increased; but the declining birth rates has also resulted in an increase in the percentage of persons age 65 and older. Whereas they constituted only 4 percent of the total population in 1900, they represent nearly 13 percent today, and this will climb to more than 20% beginning in 2030. By 2050, it is projected that nearly 23 percent (almost 1 in 4) will be age 65%. SUGGESTION FOR AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION: Distribute note cards or pieces of paper of two different colors; make sure that 25% of the group receives one color and have them stand up or hold up the card/piece of paper so the entire group can get a “visual feel” for what constitutes 1 in 4…this proportion of the entire U.S. population will be ages 65 or older in about 40 years. NOTE ON HYPERLINK AND DATA SOURCE: Clicking on underlined title of this slide will open a hyperlink to a 2002 federal report containing the information used to create this graph: http://aspe.hhs.gov/health/Reports/medicalinnovation/
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: As we have mentioned, one factor contributing to the aging of the U.S. population has been the Baby Boom generation. One way to illustrate this is to color code a population pyramid so that we can see the “bulge” of the Baby Boomers moving up the pyramid. This graph shows the relative position of the Baby Boom generation in the US population pyramid for 1960, 1990, and 2020. May want to make reference again, to the “snake” analogy. NOTES ON HYPERLINK/SOURCE: Clicking on the report image ( Aging in the US: Past, Present, and Future ) opens a hyperlink to the report from which these graphs were taken: http://www.census.gov/ipc/prod/97agewc.pdf
  • SUGGESTION FOR AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION: Ask participants to indicate (either by standing up or raising their hands) how many were born between 1946 and 1964….members of the Baby Boom generation. PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Starting in January 2011, approximately 10,000 people will turn 65 every day— and this trend will continue for 20 years! (Note: clicking on the underlined link will take you to the source document for this information: “Preparing for the Silver Tsunami”, by the Alliance for Aging Research). By 2030, almost one out of every five Americans—some 72 million people—will be 65 years or older. By 2050, the 65+ population is projected to be between 80 and 90 million, with those 85 and older close to 21 million. SOURCE NOTE: Source: Alliance for Aging Research, 2021 K Street, NW Suite 305, Washington, DC 20006; tel 202/293-2856   fax 202/785-8574 ; Website link: http://72.32.160.218/content/article/detail/826
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Not only is the overall population in the US aging, the elderly population itself is getting older. One reason is increase life expectancy. This graph illustrates that an increasing percentage of those age 65 and older are expected to live to age 90. SUGGESTION FOR AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION: Audience participation: ask how many of the participants have a close relative who has lived to age 90 or older. Indicate by a raise of hands or by standing up. NOTE ON HYPERLINK/SOURCE: Clicking on the graph image opens a hyperlink to the source of the information ( Fact Sheet on Aging America – Experience Corps ) used for the graph: http://www.experiencecorps.org/images/pdf/Fact%20Sheet.pdf
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: The previous slide focused on the percentage of Americans age 65 who are expected to survive to age 90. This slide highlights the trend that an increasing number are reaching the 100-year mark. These are data are based on a 1999 Census Report. The latest Census projection, made in 2003 calls for a US centenarian population of 1.1 million in 2050. That's up from a projection made in 1999 of 834,000. SUGGESTION FOR AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION: Have each member of the group turn to someone next to them and briefly tell of someone they know who has lived to age 100 or beyond. May want to share personal stories of people who have lived past the century mark. NOTES ON HYPERLINKS/SOURCES: Clicking on the graph image or the older woman image in this slide opens a hyperlink to a 1999 U.S. Census report ( Centenarians in the Unite States ) from which these data were taken: http://www.census.gov/prod/99pubs/p23-199.pdf There is also a new 2010 report on centenarians in the United States ( NUMBER OF CENTENARIANS IN THE UNITED STATES 01/01/1990, 01/01/2000, AND 01/01/2010 BASED ON IMPROVED MEDICARE DATA, by Bert Kestenbaum and B.Reneé Ferguson Social Security Administration.) Here is the link: http://paa2005.princeton.edu/download.aspx?submissionId=50718
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: A final point we make about population aging in the United States is that the most significant percentage increases in the number of persons age 65+ will occur for minority populations. The number of older Hispanics, for example, will increase by more than 800% between 1995 and 2050; compared to an 89% increase for the older White population, and 417% for the older Black population.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Now we turn to aging in Wisconsin. SUGGESTIONS FOR AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION: Does anyone know how many residents of Wisconsin are currently age 65+? What percentage of the total population in Wisconsin are age 65 or older? In terms of the proportion of persons age 65 and older, where does Wisconsin rank in the 50 states?
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: This graph, created by the UW Extension Applied Population Lab based on 2000 US Census data, shows that Wisconsin ranks 20 th in terms of the percentage of the population age 65 and older. Note that the percent of persons age 65+ in Florida is currently 17.6; in contrast to 13.1% for Wisconsin.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: There are currently 800,000 persons in Wisconsin who are age 65+. The Wisconsin Plan for Older Persons 2010-2012 projects that this figure will be more than 1.4 million by the year 2035. SOURCE NOTE: Source: Wisconsin Plan for Older Persons 2010-2012 ( http://dhs.wi.gov/aging/Publications/Final%20State%20Plan%2007-24-09.pdf )
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: You may recall from the previous slide that 17% of residents of Florida are age 65+. That will probably not be surprising to many of us. What may catch some of us “off-guard”, however, is this projection by the Wisconsin Demographic Services Center, updated in 2009 (reported in the Wisconsin Plan for Older People 2010-2012). Within 20 years, 22% of Wisconsin residents will be age 65 or older; that’s more and 1 in every 5….and higher than is currently the case in Florida. SOURCE NOTES: Sources: Historical Census data (1900-1980) from "Wisconsin's Older Population," WI-DHSS, Division of Policy and Budget, Bureau of Planning, May, 1987. Numbers for 1990 and 2000 from U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1990 Census, Summary Tape File 1; and Census 2000, Summary File 1. Population projections through 2035 from Wisconsin Department of Administration Demographic Services Center (Updated, 2009 Vintage). HYPERLINK NOTE: Clicking on the Wisconsin Plan for Older Persons image is a hyperlink to the document: http://dhs.wi.gov/aging/Publications/Final%20State%20Plan%2007-24-09.pdf
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: The aging of Wisconsin’s population is dramatically illustrated in these two population pyramids. The one on the left contains U.S. Census data for 1900, and depicts a fairly young population; very few older persons…and those that are counted represent only a small percentage of the total population. The pyramid on the right is a projection by the Wisconsin Demographic Service Center for 2035. A big change in shape! Moving from a young to an older population as evidenced by a significant increase in both number and proportion of older persons. SOURCE NOTE: US Bureau of the Census, 1900; Wisconsin Department on Aging, Demographic Service Center (updated November 2009). Graphs appear in the Wisconsin Plan for Older Persons 2010-2012.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Here are some slides from the UW Extension Applied Population Lab that show the changing shape of Wisconsin’s population pyramid. This one shows the structure for 1990 ( black) compared to 2007 (orange). SOURCE NOTE: UW Extension Applied Population Laboratory: http://www.apl.wisc.edu/
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: And this slide shows the change between 2007 (again, orange) and a projection for 2020 (black). Note: Switching back and forth between these two slides shows the dynamic nature of population pyramids. SOURCE NOTE: UW Extension Applied Population Laboratory: http://www.apl.wisc.edu/
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Lastly, we turn to a county-level perspective of aging populations. In the 2000 Census, almost 18% of Florida’s population was age 65+. SUGGESTIONS FOR AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION: Twenty years from now (i.e. in 2030), which Wisconsin counties will have this same percentage or higher? (answer on following slides) ( toss candy to reward those willing to offer responses…including Hershey kisses in “pyramid” shape) Between 2000 and 2007, which Wisconsin counties aged the fastest (in terms of median age)? (answer on following slides) (candy toss again) In terms of median age, which Wisconsin counties are the oldest? (answer on following slides) (candy toss)
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Based on U.S. Census data and projections, the county-maps of Wisconsin illustrate the change in percentage of persons age 65 and older between 2010 (the map on the left) and 2030 (the map on the right). Yellow indicates counties with age 65+ population of 12% or less. Increasing shades of green indicates counties with elderly populations of between 12 and 21%. And increasing shades of blue, counties with aged populations over 21%. The darkest blue – and note how many counties there are – have age 65+ populations that are more than 27%. SUGGESTION FOR AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION: Ask participants to share observations regarding why the shift toward older populations in Wisconsin counties. SOURCE NOTE: Wisconsin Plan for Older Persons 2010-2012 : http://dhs.wi.gov/aging/Publications/Final%20State%20Plan%2007-24-09.pdf
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Recall that median age is another measure or indicator of population aging. Recall that the median age is the age that divides a population into two numerically equal groups; that is, half the people are younger than this age and half are older. It is a single index that summarizes the age distribution of a population. The median age in the United States is current 36.7 (http://www.indexmundi.com/united_states/median_age.html) Here is a county map showing data on median age. Data are from US Census Bureau population estimates, 2007. Oldest counties (by median age): Burnett (45), Iron (47.6), Price (45.6), Vilas (46.9), Oneida (45.4), Florence (45.7), and Door (46.1) Youngest counties (again, by median age): Menominee (28), Dunn (31.9), Eau Claire (33.8), Pierce (34.1), and Portage (34.7) SOURCE NOTE: US Census Bureau, Census 2000 population counts by age and US Census Bureau, population estimates, 2007
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: The map in this slide illustrates the counties that are aging the fastest in terms of the change in median age from 2000 to 2007. Fastest aging counties (change in median age): Price County: 41.7 – 45.6 (an increase of almost 4 years!) Wood County: 38.0 – 41.9 Florence County: 41.9 – 45.7 Ozaukee County: 38.9 – 42.4 Manitowoc County: 38.3 – 41.6 SOURCE NOTE: US Census Bureau, Census 2000 population counts by age and US Census Bureau, population estimates, 2007
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: It is important to note that the UW Extension Applied Population website has county-level on population aging. HYPERLINK NOTE: If you are connected to the internet, clicking on the screen shot image in this slide opens a hyperlink to the displayed page: http://www.apl.wisc.edu/briefsreports.html#presentations Under the “Selected Presentations” section is a report on aging in Wisconsin: http://www.apl.wisc.edu/publications/aging_in_wisconsin.pdf
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: In the packet of materials is a table (printed on blue paper) showing Wisconsin county populations through 2030. These data were derived from the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, and are available on the web on the WDHS sited entitled, “Demographics of Aging in Wisconsin”. SUGGESTION FOR AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION: Audience participation: Look at the far right-hand column in the table printed on the blue paper – county data on number and percent of persons age 65 and older. Raise your hand (or stand up) of your county will - in the year 2035 (see right-hand column of table) have an age 65+ population of: 40% or higher in 2035 30% or higher in 2035 20% or higher in 2035 Remember, the age 65+ population in Florida at the present time is a little under 18%. HYPERLINK NOTE: Clicking on the logo for the Wisconsin Department of Health Services will take you to the Demographics of Aging in Wisconsin website: http://dhs.wisconsin.gov/aging/demographics/index.htm Once this website is accessed, clicking on “Data Tables (Excel)” will enable you to access – in spreadsheet format – county data on population aging.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: To ensure that older Americans don’t just add years to their lives, but that quality is added to those years, it will require PLANNING on behalf of individuals, families, and communities. At the national, state, county and community level, an important step in the planning process is to examine the impacts of an aging population.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: So in Part 2 of the presentation, we want you to think of the many ways in which an increasingly older population might impact a community. Three are identified on this slide (families, housing, and transportation), but there are many other areas of impact.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Within the next 20-25 years, the percentage of persons in Wisconsin who are age 65+ will rise from 13 to more than 20%...and their number will increase from 800,000 to more than 1.4 million. Some counties will have elderly populations that are more than twice what Florida is at the present time. What do you think will be some of the impacts of population aging in Wisconsin?
  • SMALL GROUP ACTIVITY – AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION Form small groups of between 3-5 persons. Select one of the first three bulleted areas (i.e. families, housing, and transportation) + one additional area (your choice). For each area, do two things: Listing as many community impacts (of population aging) as you can, and Brainstorm things that could be done to make a community more aging-friendly. Records your responses on the sheet provided in the packet. Select one member of your group to record and report.
  • SMALL GROUP ACTIVITY (CONTINUED) How might the aging of a community’s aging population affect families? Groups report on impacts on families; and suggestions for making a community more aging-friendly in this regard.
  • SMALL GROUP ACTIVITY (CONTINUED) How might the aging of a community’s aging population affect housing? Groups report on impacts on housing; and suggestions for making a community more aging-friendly in this regard.
  • SMALL GROUP ACTIVITY (CONTINUED) How might a community’s aging population affect transportation? Groups report on impacts on transportation; and suggestions for making a community more aging-friendly in this regard.
  • SMALL GROUP ACTIVITY (CONTINUED): If small groups have examined other impact areas, have them report on these at this point.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: To this point, we have illustrated the aging of populations, and discussed some its impacts on families and communities. We turn, now, to the third and concluding portion of the presentation: The challenge of creating aging-friendly communities. Our intention here is not to provide solutions; but to begin a dialogue about what makes a community aging-friendly, and to encourage careful assessment of where communities are in terms of being supportive of the needs of persons of all ages; including those who are – and will be – old. We pose two questions: 1. What are the key attributes or characteristics of aging-friendly communities? Meaning, what criteria can you use to tell if a community is a supportive place to live for persons of all ages, including those who are elderly? 2. How can you tell the extent to which your community is “aging-friendly”?
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: The Summer 2009 issue of Generations , a journal published by the American Society on Aging, was devoted entirely to the topic of creasing aging-friendly communities. One of the articles in this issue (Thomas and Blanchard’s piece entitled, “Moving beyond place: Aging in community”) describes six attributes of aging friendly communities. One of the handouts in your packet lists and defines these attributes. Aging friendly communities are usually characterized by six traits or properties. They are… Inclusive Sustainable Healthy Accessible Interdependent, and Engaged SUGGESTION FOR AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION: After reading the definitions of these six traits, think about the community where you live. Can use “clickers” for participants to “vote” on whether their respective communities exhibit each of these characteristics. Could also have people stand. HYPERLINK NOTE: Clicking on the journal image is a hyperlink to the Summer 2009 issue; only the editorial preface by Dr. Andrew Scharlach, however, can be read. But you will be able to see the other articles in the issue. Here is the URL: http://www.generationsjournal.org/generations/gen33-2/toc.cfm
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: We come now to the question we posed at the beginning of the presentation: How prepared is your community for what is often called the coming “aging wave” or “silver tsunami”.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: About five years ago, several organizations collaborated on a national survey designed to determine the extent to which America’s communities were ready the impacts of aging populations. 10,000 communities were survey. Of those who responded, only 46% have even begun to plan to plan. HYPERLINK NOTE: Clicking on the report image is a hyperlink to the actual report: http://www.aginginplaceinitiative.org/storage/aipi/documents/maturing_of_america_reformatted_for_printing.pdf
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Importantly, the state of Wisconsin has begun to plan. The Wisconsin Department of Health Services, through the Bureau of Aging and Long-Term Care Resources (the designated State Unit on Aging) has developed a State Plan for Older People. This plan outlines how Wisconsin “will foster and support the development and implementation of a comprehensive and coordinated system of services to serve older individuals”. HYPERLINK NOTE: Clicking on the image of the Wisconsin Plan for Older People 2010-2012 will take you to the actual report: http://dhs.wi.gov/aging/Publications/Final%20State%20Plan%2007-24-09.pdf
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: But how many counties and communities have followed the State’s example and developed plans of their own? An example of one county that has is Vernon. NOTE: This and the next few slides were developed for use in the presentation to the UW Extension Southern District in December 2009. They illustrate not only the pro-active planning of a county, but also the involvement of a UW Extension family living eductor (Karen Ehle-Traastad) as a key player and catalyst in this effort. Presentation to other audiences will likely need to be tailored using difference slides. SUGGESTION FOR AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION: Ask for examples of pro-active planning represented by communities/counties represented by persons in the audience.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Example of Vernon County planning; including a focus on senior services.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: One of the first steps in preparing or planning for the coming age wave is to assess the extent to which a community or county is “aging friendly”. To this end, we offer a tool that might be useful: The Aging Readiness Questionnaire; a copy of which is included in your packet. Another version of an aging-readiness questionnaire is a checklist found in Appendix B to a 2007 report published by the National Association for Area Agencies on Aging.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: The items in the questionnaire do not represent an exhaustive inventory of what it means for a community to be aging-ready, but it is at least a start. SUGGESTION FOR AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION: Complete the survey. May want to use “clickers” to collect data (RE selected items on the questionnaire) from those participating in the presentation. Example: Responses regarding high priority areas on which to focus efforts in creating more aging-friendly communities.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: As communities begin to plan for an increasingly older population, we highly recommend a 2007 report published by the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging. The report, A Blueprint for Action: Developing a Livable Community for All Ages ”, includes a 6-step model that might be useful. HYPERLINKE NOTE: If you are connected to the internet, clicking on the image of the report cover provides assess to the full report: http://www.aginginplaceinitiative.org/storage/aipi/documents/Blueprint_for_Action_web.pdf
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: The UW Extension Aging Our Communities Team has launched a blog aimed at helping to create aging-friendly communities. One of the sheets in your packet describes how to access this blog. The blog contains information that may be helpful to communities and counties. It also affords the opportunity for communities to share what they are doing – to highlight “best practice” examples of aging-friendly environments. HYPERLINK NOTE: Clicking on this screen shot provides access to the blog: http://fyi.uwex.edu/barberagingfriendlycommunities/
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: The communities in which most of us live are not optimal in terms of being good places to grow up AND GROW OLD . Efforts to design aging-friendly communities are in their infancy. Fewer than one-half of America’s cities, towns, and villages have even begun to address the impact and needs of an aging population.
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: In closing, we pose some questions: Is your community a good place to grow up and grow old? Will your community meet your needs when you are 65, 75, 85, 95…or even 105? If not, what can you do now to begin to make your community a friendly and supportive environment for persons of all ages?
  • PRESENTATION NARRATIVE: Responses to these questions will require your involvement. Are you willing to take the risk?
  • Transcript

    • 1. Creating Aging-Friendly Communities in Wisconsin
      • Clif Barber, Jane Jensen, and Judy Knudsen
      AGING IN OUR COMMUNITIES TEAM UW Extension – Family Living Programs Mission: To develop and disseminate research-based, educational programs that address the needs of Wisconsin’s aging population and their families.
    • 2. How prepared is your community for the coming “age wave” ?
    • 3. Presentation Outline
      • PART 1: Population Aging
      • PART 2: Impacts of Aging Populations
      • PART 3 : Creating Aging-Friendly Communities
    • 4. Part 1: The Aging of Populations
      • Whether we like it or not (or whether we admit it or not), all of us – as individuals - experience aging.
    • 5.
      • Aging in human beings can be measured in a number of ways: chronological, biological, psychological, social, functional, etc.
    • 6. How is Population Aging Measured?
    • 7. Measuring/Tracking Population Aging
      • Number of persons age 65+ in a population
      • Percent of a population age 65+
      • Median age: the age that divides a population into numerically equal parts
      • Number of years that it takes for the percent persons age 65+ in a population to rise from 7 to 14 percent
    • 8. Illustrating Population Aging
      • There are several ways to graphically illustrate the aging of a population. One of the most common is the population pyramid.
      Number (millions)
    • 9. Changing Shape of Population Pyramids The “shape” of a population pyramid is determined by a combination of several factors. One is birth rate. What are some other factors?
    • 10. Four Perspectives of Population Aging
    • 11. Population Aging: A Global Perspective
    • 12. Within the next 10 years, for the first time in human history….
    • 13. … the percentage (and number) of persons age 65+ in the world will be greater than those age 5 and younger!
    • 14. Current Awareness of Global Aging
    • 15. What is Meant by the Term: “Global Aging”?
      • For most of human history, until about a century ago, the elderly (people aged 65 and over) never amounted to more than 2 or 3% of the population. 
      •   Today, this figure is about 15%. By the year 2030, older persons will be around 25%...1 in every 4 people! 
      Note: With 13% age 65+, the U.S. ranks 41 st out of 224.
    • 16. Population Aging in “Developed” Countries
      • By the year 2030, the median age of the entire developed world is projected to be 45. 
      • In Japan and much of southern and eastern Europe, it will be over 50.
    • 17. Population Aging in “Developing” Countries
      • As a whole, the developing world will remain much younger (than developed countries) for the foreseeable future. 
      • Yet developing countries, too, are aging—hence the term "global aging.”
    • 18. Population Aging: A National (U.S.) Perspective
    • 19. From 1900 through 2003, life expectancy at birth increased from 48 to 75 years for men (a gain of 27 years) and from 51 to 80 years for women (a gain of 30 years). Increase in Life Expectancy: 1900-2003
    • 20. Increase in Number of Americans Age 65+
    • 21. ? January 2011: Beginning of the “Age Wave”
    • 22. Percentage of Americans Age 65 and Older: 1900-2050
    • 23. Population pyramids illustrate changing age structure for a given geographical area, and are one way to visualize and better understand the effect that the “Baby Boom” (“Aging Boom”) generation will have on the aging population in the United States – See ‘red bars’ in the population pyramids to the right --->
    • 24. Aging of the Baby Boomers…
      • When the baby boomers
      • (aka “aging” boomers) start
      • turning 65 in January 2011, approximately 10,000 people will turn 65 every day— and this trend will continue for 20 years!
      • By 2030, one out of every five Americans—some 72 million people—will be 65 years or older.
      • By 2050, the 65+ population is projected to be between 80 and 90 million, with those 85 and older close to 21 million.
    • 25. Percentage of Americans Age 65 Expected to Survive to Age 90
    • 26. Growth of U.S. Centenarians 100+!
    • 27. Projected Percentage Increases in the Number of Persons 65+ by Race: 1995-2050 Source: ““A Portrait of Older Minorities” (AARP, 1993)
    • 28. Population Aging: A Wisconsin Perspective
    • 29. Aging Populations: State Ranking (top 20)
    • 30. Wisconsin Projections
    • 31. Population Aging in Wisconsin 2008: 13.1% 2030: 22%
    • 32. Population Pyramids for Wisconsin 1900 and 2035
    • 33.  
    • 34.  
    • 35. Population Aging in Wisconsin: A County Perspective
      • In the 2000 Census, almost 18% of Florida’s population was age 65+. By 2030, which Wisconsin counties will have this same percentage or higher?
      • Between 2000 and 2007, which Wisconsin counties aged the fastest (in terms of median age)?
      • In terms of median age, which Wisconsin counties are the oldest?
    • 36. Population Aging in Wisconsin Percentage of Persons Age 65+ by County: 2010-2030 Wisconsin’s Age Wave
    • 37. Median Age by County (2007) Oldest Counties: Iron County-- 47.6 years Vilas County– 46.9 years Door County– 46.1 years Florence County– 45.7 years Price County– 45.6 years Youngest Counties: Menominee County– 28.0 years Dunn County– 31.9 years Eau Claire County– 33.8 years Pierce County– 34.1 years Portage County– 34.7 years
    • 38. Fastest Aging Counties: Change in Median Age between 2000-2007 Price County: 41.7 –> 45.6 Wood County: 38.0 –> 41.9 Florence County: 41.9 –> 45.7 Ozaukee County: 38.9 –> 42.4 Manitowoc County: 38.3 –> 41.6 Current median age in the United States is 36.7  
    • 39. UW Extension Applied Population Lab
    • 40. County-Level Data on Population Aging…
    • 41. Preparing for the “Age Wave”
      • To ensure that older Americans don’t just add years to their lives, but that quality is added to those years, it will require PLANNING on behalf of individuals, families, and communities.
      • At the national, state, county and community level, an important step in the planning process is to examine the impacts of an aging population.
    • 42. Part 2: Community Impacts of Population Aging Families Housing Transportation Other?
    • 43. What Impacts Will Population Aging Have on Wisconsin Communities?
    • 44. Impacts of the Aging Population on Your Community
      • Families/Family Caregiving
      • Housing
      • Transportation
      • Health Services
      • Land Use Planning
      • Public Safety
      • Parks and Recreation
      • Workforce Development and Education
      • Volunteerism and Civic Engagement
      • Arts and Cultural Activities
      • Economic Development
      SMALL GROUP ACTIVITY: Select one of the first three areas bulleted to the left + one additional area of your choosing. For each area, (1) list several community impacts as a result of population aging, and (2) brainstorm what might be done to make the community more aging-friendly.
    • 45. How Will the Aging Population Impact Wisconsin Families?
    • 46. How Will the Aging Population Impact Housing?
    • 47. How Will the Aging Population Impact Transportation?
    • 48.
      • Health Services?
      • Land Use Planning?
      • Public Safety?
      • Parks and Recreation?
      • Workforce Development and Education?
      • Volunteerism and Civic Engagement?
      • Arts and Cultural Activities?
      • Economic Development?
      How Will the Aging Population Impact…
    • 49.
      • What are the key attributes or characteristics of aging-friendly communities; that is, when can you tell whether a community offers a supportive environment for persons of all ages, including those who are elderly?
      • How can a community measure the extent to which it is aging-friendly?
      Part 3: Creating Aging-Friendly Communities
    • 50. Qualities or Attributes of an Aging-Friendly Community
      • Inclusive
      • Sustainable
      • Healthy
      • Accessible
      • Interdependent
      • Engaged
      Source: Thomas, W. H., & Blanchard, J. M. (2009). Moving beyond Place: Aging in community. Generations, 33(2), 12-17.
    • 51. How prepared is your community for the coming “age wave” ?
    • 52. Are America’s Communities Ready for the Coming “Age Wave”?
      • Maturing of America Survey (2005)
      • One finding: Only 46% of U.S. communities have begun planning efforts to prepare for the impacts of an aging population.
    • 53. State-Level Planning
    • 54. Examples of Wisconsin Communities and Counties Who Have Started to Plan
    • 55.  
    • 56.
      • Recommend that – as a first step – all communities carefully assess the extent to which they are “aging-ready”
      Assessing Aging Readiness Aging Readiness Questionnaire
    • 57. Aging Readiness Survey for Wisconsin Communities
      • Based on your knowledge and experience in your respective communities, please complete the “Aging Readiness Survey”
      • If you have suggestions with regard to improving the survey, please let us know.
    • 58. A Valuable Resource
    • 59. Another Resource: UW Extension Blog
    • 60. Planning and Designing Livable Communities for Older Adults…and For Persons of All Ages
      • The communities in which most of us live are not optimal in terms of being good places to grow up AND GROW OLD .
      • Efforts to design aging-friendly communities are in their infancy. Fewer than one-half of America’s cities, towns, and villages have begun to address the needs of an aging population.
    • 61. ?? Questions We All Need to Ask ??
      • Is your community a good place to grow up and grow old?
      • Will your community meet your needs when you are 65, 75, 85, 95…or even 105?
      • If not, what can you do now to begin to make your community a friendly and supportive environment for persons of all ages?
    • 62. Are you willing to take the risk?

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