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  • Dialogue and access to decision making are critical at all levels - from the regional to the local. Creating spaces for a range of stakeholders to access information and participate in decision making – from resource allocation to vulnerability mapping and policy/programme design - is critical if positive development outcomes are to be achieved despite a changing climate. This requires partnership and confidence between stakeholders (government departments, business, advocacy networks, faith groups and regional initiatives). Climate change can be a driver for greater integration across sectors, intuitions, policies and programmes.

Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2. Outline
    • Why a Climate Smart Disaster Risk Management (CSDRM) approach?
    • Development of the CSDRM Approach
    • The ‘Three Pillars’ of the Approach
    • Applications and uses of the Approach
  • 3. Why Climate Smart Disaster Risk Management approach?
    • The type , frequency and/ or intensity of extreme events are expected to change as Earth’s climate changes (IPCC 2007).
    • Increase in disaster shocks and livelihoods stresses , often affecting the poorest people.
    • People are being exposed to changing risks. for which they have little experience or local knowledge
    • Development efforts at all scales must become resilient to climate change and disasters in ways that take account of increasing uncertainty
    • Capacity development of local governments and authorities are essential for dealing with this uncertainly .
  • 4. What is Climate Smart Disaster Risk Management?
    • CSDRM is:
    • an integrated social development and disaster risk management approach that aims simultaneously to tackle
      • changing disaster risks,
      • enhance adaptive capacity,
      • address poverty, exposure, vulnerability and their structural causes and
      • promote environmentally sustainable development
    • in a changing climate
  • 5. Strengthening Climate Resilience: a new initiative
    • DFID funded initiative began in October 2009.
    • Led by a consortium of Institute of Development Studies (lead agency), Christian Aid and Plan International
    • Strengthening Climate Resilience programme is working in 10 countries:
      • South-East Asia: Cambodia, Indonesia, Philippines (led by Plan International)
      • South Asia: Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Sri Lanka (led by Christian Aid)
      • East Africa: Kenya, Tanzania, Sudan (led by Christian Aid)
  • 6. Development of the approach: an engaging process
    • Iterative development: following expert group meeting at IDS in Feb 2010
    • Co-creation:
      • Total of 14 consultations in 12 countries
      • Over 500 disaster, climate and development policy-makers and practitioners involved from over 100 organisations
      • Live editing sessions
      • Ideas based on sharing good practices
    • Validation in complex environments:
      • Three detailed case studies looking at applying the ideas in practice – Sri Lanka, Orissa, Mekong River Commission
  • 7. The Three Pillars of the Approach: detailed view followed by summary
  • 8.  
  • 9. Three “pillars” as foundation of approach Promote environmental & climate-smart development Plan for uncertainty and unexpected events Increase knowledge & support on risk & climate impacts Empower communities & local authorities to influence the powerful Ensure flexible & integrated policy & practice across sectors and scales Integrate knowledge of changing risks into vulnerability reduction Forge partnerships for rights to access basic services, assets Promote learning to improve policies and practice Assess effects of CC on disaster risks Promote socially just & equitable economic systems Increase ability of actors to innovate & experiment Integration of actors working on disasters, climate & development 3 Address poverty & vulnerability 2 Enhance adaptive capacity 1 Tackle changing disaster risks
  • 10. Climate Smart DRM
    • The CSDRM approach builds on
    • disaster risk management ,
    • climate change adaptation , and
    • development concepts and approaches
    • so as to support progress on the HFA and to promote disaster - resilient communities
    • Next two slides show the Pressure and Release Model (“Crunch model”) to illustrate links of Pillar 3 to Pillars 1 & 2
  • 11. National & International Political Economy Power relations Demographics Conflicts & War Environmental Trends Debt Crises Etc Social Structures & Power Systems Class Gender Ethnicity Caste Other power relationships Hazard Flood Cyclone Earthquake Tsunami Volcanic eruption Drought Landslide Biological D I S A S T E R Vulnerability component Livelihood & its resilience Base-line status Well-being Self-protection Social Protection Governance S O C I A L F R A M E “ Crunch” Pressure and Release (PAR) model (Cannon, adapted from At Risk ) R O O T C A U S E S
  • 12. National & International Political Economy Power relations Environmental Trends Debt Crises Etc Social Structures & Power Systems Class Gender Ethnicity Caste Other power relationships Hazard Flood Cyclone Drought Landslide Biological D I S A S T E R Vulnerability component Livelihood & its resilience Base-line status Well-being Self-protection Social Protection Governance S O C I A L F R A M E R O O T C A U S E S Climate change makes hazards worse Poverty hits environment CC undermines livelihoods
  • 13. Application and use of the Approach
  • 14. Applying the Approach
    • The Approach seeks to guide planning and evaluation of existing DRM policies, projects or programmes, as well as inform advocacy.
    • Approach is not a ‘checklist’ - but offers guidance on how to evaluate current interventions and identify how to change practice and policy for better development outcomes.
    • This should be applied in a ‘ dynamic and hands-on manner’ to enable local governments and authorities to integrate multiple dimensions / considerations (pillars) to make their initiatives adaptive to the changing climate
  • 15. Lessons from field research
    • Promoting the integration requires a range of ‘soft’ skills
      • require staff investment and must be understood in terms of building people’s capabilities to create change.
    • Dialogue and access to decision making are critical at all levels
      • Creating spaces for a range of stakeholders to access information and participate in decision making
      • This requires partnership and confidence between stakeholders .
    •   Climate change can be a driver for greater integration across sectors, intuitions, policies and programmes
      • Different type of “window of opportunity”
      • Adaptation funding – a curse or an opportunity?
  • 16. More information
    • Strengthening Climate Resilience
    • http://community.eldis.org/.59d49986/
    • CSDRM www.csdrm.org
    • Terry Cannon [email_address] Project Director
    • Katie Harris [email_address] Project Manager
    • Paula Silva Villanueva [email_address] Planning, monitoring and evaluation (PM&E)