Overview of psm
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  • Using data, we can identify an area of need for our school, a group of students, or an individual learner. Then we can develop a plan to meet that particular need, implement it, and after a few weeks, evaluate its effectiveness through data collection.
  • Identify the problem: My oil is low based on gage in dashboard.Develop hypothesis: 1. Have an oil leak. 2. Dealership didn’t put in the required amount of oil during oil change yesterday. 3. Dealership didn’t replace cap after doing oil change. 3. Gasket is broken. 4. Major engine problem.Discuss solutions.Can’t see where oil is leaking. Checked oil and it is low.Cap was replaced and tightened.Gasket around oil filter seems okay at a glance.Engine appears to be running fine.Implement action plan: Replenish oil level.Evaluate plan: Test drive vehicle and see if oil pressure maintains. Continue to check for oil leaks.
  • Have schools work in teams to follow TIPS. Teams could record work onto chart paper and then share out with group how they worked through the problem.
  • Primary prevention focuses on preventing the development of new cases of problem behaviors by focusing on all students and staff, across all settings. We expect that primary/school-wide/universal implementation will result in about 80% of students gaining the necessary behavioral and social skills necessary to be successful in school.Universal screening is a series of short assessments given during fall, winter, and spring to determine if core instruction is meeting the needs of at least 80% of students. Screening information is also used to help identify at-risk students. Most assessments are a minute in length and scores are compared to a local normative sample.Batsche, G.M. (August, 2010). We know what RtI is, now what do we do with it? Critical elements for successful implementation. Presented at the Response to Intervention (RtI) Summer 2010 Institute: Building a Context for Excellence, Macomb ISD, Clinton Township, MI. Retrieved from http://www.misd.net/rti/6A%20‑Batsche%20Critical%20Elements%20for%20Success%20keynote.pdf
  • Secondary prevention focuses on reducing the number of existing cases of problem behaviors by establishing efficient and rapid responses to problem behavior. Secondary prevention is only implemented after the successful implementation of S-W PBIS and should result in an additional 15% of students learning necessary skills.Batsche, G.M. (August, 2010). We know what RtI is, now what do we do with it? Critical elements for successful implementation. Presented at the Response to Intervention (RtI) Summer 2010 Institute: Building a Context for Excellence, Macomb ISD, Clinton Township, MI. Retrieved from http://www.misd.net/rti/6A%20‑Batsche%20Critical%20Elements%20for%20Success%20keynote.pdf
  • Tertiary prevention focuses on reducing the intensity and/or complexity of existing cases of problem behaviors that are resistant to primary and secondary prevention efforts. Once SW and Secondary efforts are in place, tertiary prevention & intervention focuses on the remaining 2-5% of the population continuing to show skill deficits.Batsche, G.M. (August, 2010). We know what RtI is, now what do we do with it? Critical elements for successful implementation. Presented at the Response to Intervention (RtI) Summer 2010 Institute: Building a Context for Excellence, Macomb ISD, Clinton Township, MI. Retrieved from http://www.misd.net/rti/6A%20‑Batsche%20Critical%20Elements%20for%20Success%20keynote.pdf
  • Tertiary prevention focuses on reducing the intensity and/or complexity of existing cases of problem behaviors that are resistant to primary and secondary prevention efforts. Once SW and Secondary efforts are in place, tertiary prevention & intervention focuses on the remaining 2-5% of the population continuing to show skill deficits. Progress monitoring: The collection of assessment data that indicates the effectiveness of instruction and helps teachers in planning subsequent lessons. In most cases, AIMSweb or Dibels Next probes are used to progress monitor, although there are other data sources that can be used to support those probes as well, such as running records, phonics assessments, etc. At tier 1, progress monitoring is usually in the form of a pre/post assessment. At tier 2 and 3, progress monitoring occurs more frequently.Batsche, G.M. (August, 2010). We know what RtI is, now what do we do with it? Critical elements for successful implementation. Presented at the Response to Intervention (RtI) Summer 2010 Institute: Building a Context for Excellence, Macomb ISD, Clinton Township, MI. Retrieved from http://www.misd.net/rti/6A%20‑Batsche%20Critical%20Elements%20for%20Success%20keynote.pdf
  • Be sure that teams discuss how the essential elements fit in with goals that their schools already have for the year. Have teams share connections with critical elements and initiatives they are already working towards for the year.
  • Make sure to emphasize that instructional decisions are not just made for individual students. The majority of the team’s focus should be on making instructional decisions to monitor core instruction.
  • Have participants read through hand-out that explains the roles and responsibilities of each. Be sure that participants know that members can fulfill more than one role.
  • Have teams share at least one initiative that PSM will help them accomplish.
  • So, how does RtI mesh with other statewide initiatives? Let’s look at a few ofthe larger initiatives.Teacher & Executive Standards – RtI clearly addresses data driven instructionwhich can be linked to those standards.Formative Assessment - With formative assessment, teachers are continuouslygathering formal and informal data to drive instruction.Early Literacy- Research suggests that a focus on early literacy skills savestime and money. With an RtI model schools have to focus on those earlyliteracy skills and are enabled to provide any needed intervention at a muchearlier age.Common Core & Essential Standards – An RtI model requires schools tocontinuously look at data to ensure that those standards are being taught.To serve different purposes, we need different types of assessmentIn education (and RtI) assessments we use fall into one of three categories:summative, benchmark, and formative assessments.ACRE – NC’s comprehensive initiative to redefine the SCOS for k-12, studenttesting program, and student accountability model – stream line all types ofassessment we use in NCActivity for participants:List all assessments used in district/ school buildingThen classify as type (summative, benchmark, formative) and role (universalscreening, diagnostic, progress monitoring)27RtI is a framework for school improvement so it marries with other key stateand federal initiatives well. First, the common core. NC has adopted thecommon core standards. These standards have many aspects that align withRtI. For example, here we see the anchor standard for grades K-12 ELA.Students must read text at their level (fiction and nonfiction) independently andproficiently. RtI gives the means to allow all students to read text proficientlythrough targeted intervention/instruction based on student needs.28
  • RtI is a framework for school improvement so it marries with other key stateand federal initiatives well. First, the common core. NC has adopted thecommon core standards. These standards have many aspects that align withRtI. For example, here we see the anchor standard for grades K-12 ELA.Students must read text at their level (fiction and nonfiction) independently andproficiently. RtI gives the means to allow all students to read text proficientlythrough targeted intervention/instruction based on student needs.28
  • Next is the connection to ACRE. ACRE calls for giving parents and teacherstimely access to student progress. RtI assists with this by always keepingparents involved at each Tier and using formative evaluation to communicateprogress often.
  • The professional teaching standards indicate that teachers must use authenticassessments to demonstrate student understanding.
  • A comprehensive balanced assessment is used within the RtI framework todetermine if students are responding to instruction
  • Have participants choose one barrier and share that they think will have the biggest impact on implementation at their school.
  • Task for the next hour:Create a power point presentation for your school using the presentation from today. Keep presentation within 20 minutes only giving staff the most essential information:What is PSM?How does RtI and PBIS fit into PSM?What are the critical elements of PSM?Be sure to give staff internet links or articles that they may access more information on their own.
  • Task for the next hour:Create a power point presentation for your school using the presentation from today. Keep presentation within 20 minutes only giving staff the most essential information:What is PSM?How does RtI and PBIS fit into PSM?What are the critical elements of PSM?Should include consensus building activity.Be sure to give staff internet links or articles that they may access more information on their own.

Overview of psm Overview of psm Presentation Transcript

  •  Good Morning! Take a few minutes and begin to list what you know about PSM, concerns you have, and questions you would like answered. Be prepared to share your biggest concern with our group. As you introduce your team, also be prepared to share which famous team your school most likely compares to as you think about implementing PSM.
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FysobubtDcI
  • Problem Solving Model
  • Problem Solving Model (PSM)Defined Problem-solving model (PSM) › An approach to developing interventions and ensuring positive student outcomes, rather than determining failure or deviance (Deno, 1995).  Multiple step  Cyclical process
  •  Framework that focuses on: › Appropriate, targeted instruction matched to the student’s need › Researched-based teaching strategies › Early intervention/prevention › Accurate assessment with valid, reliable data › Frequent progress monitoring that drives instruction and level of intensity › Informed instructional decisions
  • Data
  •  Look at the data from one of our schools. Identify an area of need based on that data. Develop hypotheses to explain why the problem might be occurring. Discuss possible solutions to solve the problem. Be sure to give a reason WHY you chose this solution. Select a solution. Discuss how you would monitor the implementation of your plan. Discuss how you would know your plan worked.
  • So what does RtI and PBIS have to do withPSM?
  •  RtI and PBIS Identify share a Problem systematic, data driven, leveled Evaluate Plan Develop Hypotheses approach to intervention based on student needs. Implement Discuss In other words, Plan Solutions both frameworks utilize problem
  •  This model has been developed to assist parents and teachers who need help designing educational solutions for problems that arise in schools. “RtI focuses on › Measurement of intervention effectiveness › Early identification and early intervention › A graduated series of increasingly intense interventions guided by data based decision making” - Problem Solving Model in Detail: Preparation for Implementation, Dr. Tom Jenkins
  • PBIS Defined…PBIS is a broad range of systemic and individualized strategies for achieving important social and learning outcomes while preventing problem behavior. - OSEP Center on PBIS
  • RtI PBIS Tier I/Core  Universal Tier II/Supplemental  Secondary Tier III/ Intensive  Tertiary Tier IV – EC Services  Tertiary – EC Services
  • What do PSM schools have incommon?
  •  Universal Screening Core Instruction Tiers of Increasing Support Family Involvement Researched Based Instruction Progress Monitoring/Data Driven Instruction Fidelity of Implementation/Instruction Increased Collaboration
  • Core – Tier 1 Core instruction is the programs, strategies, and/or materials that are used with ALL students. Our goal is for core instruction to meet the needs(Batsche, 2010) of at least 80% of our students. 17
  • Supplemental – Tier II < 20% of students Core + Supplemental …to achieve benchmarks Tier 2 Instruction is in addition to core instruction and is usually conducted in small groups.(Batsche, 2010) 18
  • Individualized – Tier III < 5% of Students Core + Supplemental + Intensive Individual Instruction …to achieve benchmarks Tier III instruction is the most intensive level of intervention outside of EC. In many of our schools, remediation teachers are used to implement interventions at this(Batsche, 2010) tier. 19
  • Progress monitoring, family involvement, and researched based instruction occur throughout the tiers of support. However, the intensity of those elements increase as instructional supports increase.(Batsche, 2010) 20
  • Essential OUTCOMESSupportsfor PSM SupportingStaff Behavior PRACTICES Supporting •Develop plan •Implement Plan Decision Making Supporting Student Behavior
  • Current Process vs PSM Waits for student to fail Promotes early intervention Evaluation Procedures Framework for implementation of effective practiceTargets “what is wrong” with the student Targets instructional change Driven by hope for EC Prevents “instructional casualties” placement Leads to identification of students Leads to over-identification not making adequate growthThe same for every school Uniquely designed for each site A special education An “EVERY” education process process
  •  Discuss with your team the essential components of PSM. Choose 4 people from your team to represent your school and play “PSM Team Feud.”
  • - Administrator- Grade Level Representatives- EC Representative- School Psychologist- Academic Coach- Remediation Teacher- Student Services Representative
  •  Oversees PSM process Develops systems to provide structure for PSM (policies/procedures) Utilizes data to guide instructional decisions Identifies instructional resources (Practices) Monitors fidelity of implementation Communicates with other staff and committees
  •  Academic & Behavior Coaches PSM Facilitator Multidisciplinary Representatives Data-base Manager Communication Coordinator Time Keeper Other
  •  Will your team… › have grade level representatives? › have representatives for each tier of support? › have combinations of both? If you already implement PBIS, will your team… › have a subcommittee to build structure for RtI? › have designated meetings to discuss implementation of both PBIS and RtI?
  •  Discuss team members and roles to be filled. Complete the document and assign members to roles.
  • Begin reading “Professional LearningCommittees, Data Driven DecisionMaking, and Response to Intervention” asyou return from lunch.
  •  Take a minute and discuss the article with your team. › What are things you are being asked to do already in your building? › Are you able to see how PSM could facilitate the implementation of those initiatives?
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  •  http://www.flippengroup.com/education/ckh.h tml
  •  Read “ Create Your Implementation Blueprint: Avoiding Implementation Pitfalls.” Let’s review with another round of PSM Family Feud…
  • Managing Complex Change ActionVision + Skills + Incentives + Resources + Plan = Change + Skills + Incentives + Resources + Action Plan = ConfusionVision + + Incentives + Resources + Action Plan = AnxietyVision + Skills + + Resources + Action Plan = ResistanceVision + Skills + Incentives + + Action Plan = FrustrationVision + Skills + Incentives + Resources + = False Starts Adapted from Knoster, T.
  • 1. On a sticky note, jot down your own ideas of what the school of your dreams would look like.2. Share with your team. Note common terms, ideas, and themes on your large paper.3. Now create a draft statement for your team using information from steps 1 and 2 to create your team’s vision of the desired state of your school.4. After reviewing your draft, compose a PSM statement and write it on your large paper.
  • Creating an action plan
  •  Use your action plan to help guide your team in the following: › Making your own overview presentation › Building consensus
  • www.aPBIS.orgwww.ncpublicschools.org/positivebehaviorhttp://www.dpi.state.nc.us/curriculum/responsiveness/http://www.rti4success.org/ 9/13/2012 47
  •  Feel Free to contact us @ Jodi_Hayes@abss.k12.nc.us Heather_Boysel@abss.k12.nc.us Alma_scoby@abss.k12.nc.us Cayce_McCamish@abss.k12.nc.us Sara_Kesler@abss.k12.nc.us Michael_Thomas@abss.k12.nc.us