Internet Safety

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  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet Objective Given instructions, resources, access to the NetSmartz websites and NetSmartz downloads page, participants will demonstrate the ability to use the NetSmartz Workshop as a tool to help educate and protect Missouri’s children on the Internet by performing the following tasks during their session: Detail the need for an Internet education program such as NetSmartz Convey the purpose and goals of NetSmartz Workshop Identify the resources provided by NetSmartz Locate and use age-appropriate resources from multiple sources Create a plan for implementation of the NetSmartz curriculum in the classroom
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet It is important to note the types of dangers to which children may be susceptible on the Internet. In addition to the useful and educational information available on the Internet, a great deal of content exists that is not appropriate for children. This content can include nudity or other sexually explicit material; hate group or racist websites; promotional material about tobacco, alcohol, or drugs; graphic violence; information on satanic or cult groups; or even recipes for making bombs or other explosives. (Internet Safety, 13) Other Internet dangers to children include sexual exploitation or enticement. Sexual predators may target children online while maintaining relative anonymity. The nature of online interaction facilitates deception about the predator's identity, age and intentions. Millions of children online form a large pool from which predators can select victims. (Internet Safety, 21) Sexual predators frequent various chat rooms looking for children. These predators target likely victims; make contact; and work to develop friendship, emotional reliance and interest in sexual topics. He or she may initiate offline sexual relations quickly or spend months "grooming" the child towards a sexual relationship. Sexual predators may use material goods, such as compact discs and games, to attract children offline. There have been cases in which predators have sent children bus tickets or money to cover the cost of travel or traveled to meet children. (Internet Safety, 23)
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet According to a national survey based on interviews with 1,501 youth between the ages of 10 and 17 who use the Internet regularly, Approximately one in five received a sexual solicitation or approach over the Internet in one year. One in thirty-three received an aggressive sexual solicitation – a solicitor who asked to meet them somewhere; called them on the telephone; sent them regular mail, money, or gifts. One in four had an unwanted exposure to pornography in the last year. One in seventeen was threatened or harassed. Less than 10% of sexual solicitations and only 3% of unwanted exposure episodes were reported to authorities, such as a law-enforcement agency, an Internet Service Provider or a hotline. Only 17% of youth and approximately 10% of parents could name a specific authority, such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation, CyberTipline or an Internet Service Provider, to which they could make a report, although more said they had “heard of” such places. In households with home Internet access, one third of the parents said they had filtering or blocking software on their computer at the time they were interviewed. (Finkelhor, ix)
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet The national teen Internet survey was funded by Cox Communications in partnership with the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children® (NCMEC), and was conducted among 1,160 teens age 13 to 17 during March 2006. The Research was conducted by Teen Research Unlimited (TRU). Approximately 61% of 13 to 17 year olds have a personal profile on sites such as MySpace, Friendster, or Xanga. Half have posted pictures of themselves online. Older teens (16 to 17 year olds) represent the majority of youths who use the Internet for social interaction, meeting friends, and networking. 14% have actually met face-to-face with a person they had known only through the Internet (9% of 13 to 15 year olds and 22% of 16 to 17 year olds). 30% have considered meeting someone they’ve only communicated with online. 71% reported receiving messages online from someone they don’t know. 45% have been asked for personal information by someone they don’t know. Only 18% said they tell a parent or guardian that they received a message from someone they don’t know. View the full report at: http://www.netsmartz.org/pdf/cox_teensurvey_may2006.pdf
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet This vignette is a dramatization of the true story of a 15-year-old girl who ran away from home to meet in person with a man she first met online. The story is narrated by the girl who experienced it. It is important to know that Amy went with this man on more than one occasion. The first was voluntary. The second was because she felt that, if she did not, he would harm her family. Each time she was gone for multiple days. Graphic details of the story are intentionally not included to prevent the story from being perceived as “sensational” and more real to students.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet National Case Study Kacie Rene Woody was a 13-year-old girl living with her father and brother in Conway, Arkansas. On the evening of Dec. 3, her brother reported her missing after he had not heard from her in four hours. The children's father was at work as a police officer in a neighboring town. (San Diego Man Kills) Investigators came to the home, searched Kacie's computer and discovered that David Fuller of San Diego, California, had struck up an Internet relationship with Kacie. They found an alias Fuller had been using and traced him to a motel in Conway. There they discovered that he had rented a van and left a telephone number with the rental agency that matched a number on the Woody's home telephone records. (FBI agents search) Inside her Arkansas home, it appeared Kacie fought for her life. Along with signs of a struggle, police found a chair propped against a door. When police found her broken eyeglasses and realized that she left the house without shoes, they were led to believe that Kacie had not invited Fuller to come to Arkansas and wasn't aware that he was coming. (SWAT team finds bodies) Police spent most of Dec. 4 searching for Kacie. They went to a nearby storage facility after receiving a tip. Upon arriving at the storage facility, they heard a gunshot. Police believe the shot they heard was Fuller committing suicide. (FBI agents search) Kacie had already been killed. Authorities in Arkansas believe Fuller may have kidnapped other children prior to allegedly abducting Kacie. Police were doubtful that this was Fuller's first time, since "There weren't a lot of missteps made or sloppiness on his part. There was some planning done here.“ (FBI agents search)
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet Missouri Case Study #1 “ Alton police Lt. Jody O'Guinn entered an Internet chatroom posing as a young girl. Within a few minutes, he had several “hits” from E-mail addresses claiming to be interested adult males.” O’Guinn said that some make small talk for a little while, but others get straight to the point. "It can get pretty graphic. Some want to know if you have nude pictures and if you've had sex. It all happens very quickly,” said O’Guinn. “ In its first two weeks of going undercover on the Internet, the Alton Police Department arrested three men who they say offered money to have sex with the department's fictitious 14-year-old girl, who was played by more than one officer. “ Among those arrested was Kevin Coan, 39, a top administrator of the St. Louis Election Board. O'Guinn said the department knew nothing of Coan's prominence and had been hoping to make more cases before making sensational news. But the case shed light on a murky underworld in cyberspace and the growing, fledgling, efforts by police to fight it. “ Coan, the St. Louis election official, stands accused of indecent solicitation of a child, a felony in Illinois. The charges allege that he met ‘Amber’ in a chatroom, proposed sex acts and offered to pay her $75. Alton police arrested him at a supermarket at which ‘Amber’ had agreed to meet him. “ Through a friend, Coan said he was set up by a caller who claimed that Coan's wife had collapsed at the store. He is free on bond.” (Police Begin Patrolling) Missouri Case Study #2 “ Seven teenagers face serious legal problems in St. Peters for allegedly making and selling pornographic videotapes of a female classmate.” The investigation began when two students at Fort Zumwalt South High School approached the school resource officer and reported that a fellow student was selling viewings of a nude picture of a female student. The school was notified immediately by the police department. “The investigation determined that a video tape, made at a home in St. Peters, depicts a nude 15-year-old girl. Officers say the girl agreed to strip for the boys and did it on two separate occasions.” According to the police, the students brought a high tech cell phone to school on which the video was downloaded. They then offered to sell those cell phone photos for $5 dollars or offered a chance to view the entire tape for $10. The kids were all 15 years old and students at Fort Zumwalt South. “St. Peters police recovered the video from the bedroom of one of the participants where part of the filming occurred and determined that the 15-year-old girl agreed to participate in the video and referred her to juvenile court for follow-up. “ Police say three of the boys have been referred to juvenile court on charges of promoting child pornography in the 1st degree, furnishing pornographic materials to a minor, and promoting a sexual performance by a child.” (Seven Students Charged)
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet Tracking Teresa is based on the true story of a girl who did not realize the possible consequences of giving out her personal information on the Internet.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet The NetSmartz Workshop provides children with original, animated characters and age-appropriate, interactive activities that use the latest 3-D and Web technologies to entertain while they educate. Boys & Girls Clubs leaders and children played vital roles in the appearance of the program content and characters, ensuring that the NetSmartz messages were on target and characters appealed to the respective age groups. In September 2001, the NetSmartz content was pilot-tested. The Internet safety program was released to all Clubs nationwide in August 2002. The program is currently being implemented in public school systems in several states as well as Europe.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet NetSmartz teaches the following rules for online safety: I will tell my parents, my guardian or a trusted adult if anything makes me feel scared, uncomfortable or confused. I will ask my parents, my guardian or a trusted adult before sharing my personal information. I won’t meet in person with anyone I have first “met” online.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet The NetSmartz Workshop uses the latest Web-based solutions and is available to the public at no cost. The NetSmartz activities, designed for ages 5 to 7, 8 to 12 and 13 and older, combine the newest technologies available and the most current information to create high-impact educational activities that are well received by even the most tech-savvy kids of any age group.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet This report is based on two visits to the NetSmartz Workshop pilot sites. The first visit occurred before the implementation of the NetSmartz program. The follow-up visit occurred after the completion of the NetSmartz program, approximately one month later. In all age groups, knowledge and awareness of Internet safety was disturbingly low before the program; however, youth knowledge and awareness increased significantly after participating in the NetSmartz program. Over two-thirds of the Club members age 12 and younger felt that the NetSmartz program would change their behavior on the Internet. 86 percent of the teens felt that the I-360 program changed the way they think about the Internet. 83 percent said it has changed their behavior online and that they would now be "more careful" when using the Internet and sharing information. Youth also reported positively about the design of the program, in that it spoke to them, not down to them, and "made it real."
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet Teens felt the I-360 program sent a strong message of "it could happen to you" that challenged their belief that Internet anonymity was their safeguard. Of particular importance to this age group was the use of youth their own age to teach the safety concepts that reinforced the message. Adults, especially parents and Club staff, are ideally placed to provide training and guidance on safer Internet use. Internet safety is an ongoing concern that should continue to be addressed and reinforced on a regular basis and not implemented as a one-time event. Prior to NetSmartz, one in four youth had never received information about Internet safety issues. While youth might be aware of some of the elements of Internet safety, their behavior online might still be a cause for concern, even after training. Youth, especially older youth, were confident in their ability to avoid rules and guidelines given by their parents in order to access potentially unsafe or inappropriate material or sites. Younger youth were found to have a lower level of Internet safety knowledge, even after training, which highlights the need for continued training as these youth develop and are exposed to more on the World Wide Web. References These findings are taken from the following report: Branch Associates. NetSmartz Evaluation Project: Internet Safety Training for Children and Youth Ages 6 to 18 . Atlanta, GA: Boys & Girls Clubs of America and National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, 2002. NetSmartz. <http://www.netsmartz.org>
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet NetSmartz can be used online or downloaded onto a computer. The downloadable NetSmartz  Workshop materials are a higher quality than what is available on the web and are run without Internet access. The downloadable version has the full-motion audio, video, and animation quality expected from a cartoon. These downloadable versions are available only to states that have an official partnership with NetSmartz. Clicky’s Web World is designed for children K-2 nd grade and includes the character “Clicky”. He a web robot who helps to introduce us to the world of the Internet. He also teaches us how to avoid the Web Outlaws! NetSmartz Rules! Is designed for primarily for 3 rd -6 th grade. Characters Nettie and her little brother Webster are “street-wise” about the Internet. They teach us about safety on the World Wide Web and how to watch out for the WYSIWYG’s (what you see ISN’T what you get) of the Internet. i-360 is an independent learning program including vignettes based on actual experiences to teach teens about Internet safety and the importance of good netiquette.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet Activities – Interactive exercises that teach specific lessons about Internet safety. Games – The games provided in the NetSmartz workshop are strictly for fun and incorporate the characters and concepts of Internet safety. There is no direct lesson taught through the games. They are to reinforce and make NetSmartz fun for kids. Activity cards - Activity cards are designed to help you incorporate the NetSmartz online activities into your teachings. These cards were created by teachers for teachers to use. They will coordinate a classroom or lab activity with an online activity and provide ideas for discussion. Internet safety certificates – These are downloadable certificates to be awarded upon completion of the corresponding program. Web licenses – A license to be issued to those who complete the corresponding program, granting Internet privileges. Internet safety pledges – Pledge to be signed by student and teacher/parent acknowledging Internet safety policy as set forth by NetSmartz. Adventure games – Additional feature games where students can role play to stop Internet crimes and capture outlaws. There are two games designed for different age groups. Clicky’s Quest and Derek in Distress.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet These activity cards are related to the online activities and easy to implement with few extra materials. Printable handouts are included.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet Grades K-2 The Web Connection Students are introduced to the concept of the Internet and the idea of the World Wide Web by comparing it to a spider’s web. Children watch “The Web Connection,” an interactive activity where Clicky explains how we connect to each other on the Web. The activity card leads the class in a hands-on activity showing this concept. Log in to Clicky’s Web World by double-clicking the Clicky’s Web World icon on the desktop. The Clicky login screen appears. To lead a class, log in using teacher as both the first and last names. This will allow the instructor to access any of the activities in any order. The Clicky’s Web menu appears. Select THE WEB CONNECTION from the menu and view the program with students. Use the activity card for The Web Connection, located on the state intranet, to supplement the program with a group activity.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet Grades 3-4 Meet the WizzyWigs Students watch Meet the WizzyWigs and are introduced to possible dangers of the Internet in the form of characters named the WizzyWigs. They then write and illustrate a story about one of the WizzyWigs. Log in to NetSmartz Rules by double-clicking the NetSmartz Rules icon on the desktop. The NetSmartz login screen appears. To lead a class, log in using teacher as both the first and last names. This will allow the instructor to access any of the activities in any order. The NetSmartz Rules Web menu appears. Select MEET THE WIZZYWIGS from the menu and view the program with students. Use the activity card for Meet the WizzyWigs, located on the state intranet, to supplement the program with a group activity.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet Grades 5-6 Who’s Your Friend on the Internet? Students watch Who’s Your Friend on the Internet? and write a question or concern about communicating with people online. A panel of students offers possible solutions to the concerns. The group is encouraged to discuss the suggested solutions and offer alternative solutions as well. Log in to NetSmartz Rules by double-clicking the NetSmartz Rules icon on the desktop. The NetSmartz login screen appears. To lead a class, log in using teacher as both the first and last names. This will allow the instructor to access any of the activities in any order. The NetSmartz Rules Web menu appears. Select WHO’S YOUR FRIEND ON THE INTERNET from the menu and view the program with the students. Use the activity card for Who’s Your Friend on the Internet, located on the state intranet, to supplement the program with a group activity.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet Middle School Keisha’s Crime and Angela’s Experience Students learn vocabulary dealing with Internet behavior. They watch two stories about online teens put at risk and identify unacceptable online behavior, such as flaming and cyberstalking . To view Keisha and Angela, log in to I-360 by double-clicking the I-360 icon on the desktop. Select KEISHA’S CRIME , then ANGELA’S EXPERIENCE from the menu and view the programs with students.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet New section for teens. In addition to other materials available, this section provides videos and a comic strip with information on topics like social networking and being safe with your information online.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet Teen PSA: “Promises” Teens fall for "promises" from people they first "meet" online Students discuss the risks and how they can avoid similar situations by communicating with trusted adults.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet "NetSmartz Agents: Derek in Distress" Nicole is worried that her twin brother Derek may have left to meet in person with someone he first met online, so she has called in the NetSmartz Agents to help track him down. Children grades 4 through 6 can test their detective skills while learning about various Internet dangers as they search through the Washington D.C. area for clues and people that may lead them to find Derek before it's too late. "Clicky's Quest" The mysterious Baron E. Vyle has released the Webville Outlaws to wreak havoc on the Internet. Help Agent Clicky recapture the Outlaws before it’s too late. Children grades 1 through 3 will enjoy multiple levels of game play as they learn what Internet dangers each of the four Outlaws represent and how to appropriately respond to those dangers.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet Parents & Guardians - Communication is an effective tool for parents and guardians when helping their children avoid the dangers that exist on the Internet. NetSmartz provides on- and offline learning activities for parents to facilitate discussions with their children and teens about Internet safety. Educators - This page is designed to show educators and administrators how to use NetSmartz interactive materials in their classrooms, accumulate more information about Internet safety and technology, and take steps to bring their classrooms into the 21st century. Complete with downloadable programs for educators and links to national education standards.. Law Enforcement - NetSmartz offers a variety of resources to law enforcement to assist them in their efforts to keep their communities safer. Whether the presentation is 10 minutes long or 2 hours, for children or adults, NetSmartz resources can accommodate the circumstance. Teens -Watch teens share their own “Real-Life Stories” about issues affecting them on the Internet such as cyberbullying, online enticement, and giving out too much personal information. Teen learn to use the CyberTipline to report any incidents of Internet exploitation. Kids – Links users to the page containing activities and games for the Clicky’s Web World and NetSmartz Rules programs. Kids can also e-mail the NetSmartz characters.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet The state intranet page provides links to the downloadable version of NetSmartz. Once downloaded, this program can be used for teacher-led activities for an entire group or for students individually. Students may create their own logins and complete the activities at their own pace. Once the activities are completed, students receive a Web license and a completion certificate. To view the downloadable version, go to: http://www.netsmartz.org/education/mo/. There are materials provided in the downloadable version that are not on the website. Downloading the NetSmartz Program Go to the state intranet site. For example, http://www.netsmartz.org/education/mo/ . The state intranet window appears. Select All Downloads under the Get link. The download information will appear. Select a program for download according to the instructor and group needs. For example, under Software select Netsmartz Activities. The Description window appears. Click on Windows Installer or Macintosh Disk Image (depending on your operating system). The download windows appears. Follow the instructions to completely download the program.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet Option 2: Individual Activities Each program has a series of interactive, age-appropriate activities that can be completed over a period of time. Students will spend approximately five to ten minutes on each activity and can complete the self-running programs at their own pace. Once students create a login, the computer program will track the students’ progress and ensure that the activities are completed in order. Upon completion, students will be prompted to print out a certificate and Web license to hand to their instructor. Grades K-2 - Clicky’s Web World This independent learning program is a series of four short, interactive activities that teach about Internet safety. Grades 3-6 - NetSmartz Rules This independent learning program is a series of eight short, interactive activities that teach about the possible dangers children may encounter online. Middle/High School - I-360 This independent learning program is a series of six vignettes, based on actual experiences, created to teach teens about Internet safety and the importance of having good netiquette.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet There are ways Internet safety concepts can be incorporated into the classroom without formally teaching Internet safety as a separate topic. The activity cards introduce a variety of teaching suggestions. Many of the teaching activities involve writing, role-playing and art projects that could easily be adapted to fulfill more than one educational requirement. Materials may be customized to meet students’ needs. Use the computer programs and activity cards as a bonus activity, if students finish work early.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children provides full-color tri-fold pamphlets describing the benefits and location of the NetSmartz curriculum. Call 1-800-THE LOST (800-843-5678) The initial 50 copies are free. Each additional pamphlet costs 10 cents.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet Internet Safety Night information Links to Internet Safety Resources. One of these resources is http://psacentral.adcouncil.org/psacentral/signon.do
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet Many parents, caregivers, teachers are at a big disadvantage when it comes to the internet. Chat rooms in particular have developed their own language. To help caregivers keep up the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children supplies other aids to help decipher chat room speech.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet General FAQs The list of things I have to teach already seems impossible! How can I possibly add one more thing? There are ways to integrate Internet safety concepts into the classroom even if there isn’t time to formally teach Internet safety as a separate topic. Scan the overviews of the activity cards and look for activities that correspond to concepts that are already part of the core curriculum. Many of the teaching activities involve writing, role-playing and art projects that can be easily adapted to fulfill more than one educational requirement. The activity cards introduce a variety of teaching suggestions. Please customize the materials to the students’ needs. Assign the NetSmartz materials to students to complete independently. Clicky’s Web World, NetSmartz Rules and I-360 are self-running programs that allow students to learn about Internet safety on their own. They create a login and the computer will remember where they left off the next time they log in on the same computer. This allows students to receive information without taking time out of the teaching schedule. How will students view the materials? Students will view the materials as a group with a computer connected to a television monitor or LCD projector or in a classroom, library or computer lab where they can work on individual computers.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet Parents & Educators Site FAQs Why should educators visit the NetSmartz Parents & Educators site? NetSmartz Parents & Educators is a section of http://www.NetSmartz.org. Educators who want to take advantage of the many benefits of the Internet but are concerned about the possible risks to children should visit the Parents & Educators section. What can educators find at the Parents & Educators section? The Parents & Educators section provides educators with relevant and current information on Internet safety issues that affect children. Activity cards, coloring pages and other online and offline classroom activities are also provided. When should a teacher visit the NetSmartz Workshop? If you are interested in using the Internet as a teaching tool in the classroom, you should learn about the possible dangers online. This website http://www.NetSmartz.org is a free service that educators can access any time day or night. Where might a teacher find useful Internet information for the classroom? The NetSmartz Parents & Educators section provides age-appropriate information on Internet issues for children grades K-2, 3-6, middle school and high school. Teachers may visit the Classroom Activities section to get activity ideas developed by teachers for teachers. How can educators use the NetSmartz Parents & Educators section? The Parents & Educators section provides current and accurate information about the Internet and safety issues that affect your students. Site information includes "Online Rules" for safety, "Definitions" of commonly used Internet terms, current news and ideas for discussing Internet safety with your students. You can also go to the Classroom Activities section and get activity ideas, coloring pages and much more. How can schools help promote Internet safety? Children learn a great deal in the classroom about the basic rules for living. Schools offer a pre-existing system for delivering educational messages. Thus, it is important for schools to provide children with accurate information about their personal safety as it relates to the Internet. The information provided on the NetSmartz website is designed to help educators increase children's ability to recognize and avoid potentially dangerous situations and teach youth how to better protect themselves online.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet Technology FAQs What should educators do if Macromedia™ MX Flash is not installed on the computer? The website takes advantage of the Macromedia MX Flash plug-in and will automatically check to see whether it is installed on the computer. If the computer does not have the Flash plug-in, or has an older version (i.e. 4 or 5), teachers will be immediately redirected to a site that will provide a link to Macromedia. Once at Macromedia, follow the instructions. If the computer does not redirect teachers to Macromedia, the Flash plug-in is available at the following site: http://www.macromedia.com/shockwave/download/ download.cgi?P1_Prod_Version=ShockwaveFlash What should educators do if they are still unable to connect to http://www.NetSmartz.org after installing the flash plug-in? If teachers are unable to access http://www.NetSmartz.org after installing the Flash plug-in, chances are an IT administrator must install the plug-in. Sometimes firewalls or password-protected computers will not allow plug-ins or downloads to be installed to your computer. What technology affords the best viewing of NetSmartz? NetSmartz uses the latest technology and sometimes download times can be long, if viewed on a computer with a dial-up connection. Although NetSmartz can be viewed on multiple platforms (PC, Mac) and a variety of hardware, it is best viewed: Using a high-speed Internet connection In Internet Explorer™ At screen resolutions of at least 800 x 600 or higher On a Pentium 3 processor or higher On a personal computer To check or change the screen resolution settings on your PC: Right-click on your desktop. Choose Properties > Settings . In the screen area section, you will be able to see your current resolution setting. By using the mouse, you can adjust the setting. Most computers are set at 640 x 480, but NetSmartz is best viewed at resolutions of at least 800 x 600.
  • NetSmartz February 2008 Copyright © 2008 MOREnet Resources Branch Associates. NetSmartz Evaluation Project: Internet Safety Training for Children and Youth Ages 6 to 18 . Atlanta: Boys & Girls Clubs of America and National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, 2002. "FBI agents search San Diego area home for clues in killing of Arkansas girl." North County Times. 7 Dec. 2002 <http://www.nctimes.net/news/2002/20021207/wwww.html>. Finkelhor, David, Kimberly J. Mitchell, and Janis Wolak. Online Victimization: A Report on the Nation's Youth. Alexandria, VA: National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, 2000. Internet Safety . Atlanta: Boys & Girls Clubs of America, 2001. More Online, Doing More. Washington, DC: The Pew Internet & American Life Project, 2001. NetSmartz. <http://www.netsmartz.org> "Police Begin Patrolling Cyberspace for Sexual Predators; Training is Increasing, Cooperation is Growing Among Agencies Here." St. Louis Post-Dispatch . 11 March 2001. "San Diego Man Kills Arkansas Girl and Self." KFMB TV . 6 Dec. 2002 <http://www.kfmb.com/results.php?storyID=12479&is=y>. "Seven Students Charged With Child Pornography." KSDK TV . 24 Sept. 2003 <http://www.ksdk.com/news/news_article_lc.asp?storyid=47372>. "SWAT team finds bodies of girl, S.D. man." The San Diego Union-Tribune. 6 Dec. 2002 <http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/ metro/20021206-9999_2m6arkgirl.html>.
  • Internet Safety

    1. 1. NetSmartz Keeping Kids Safer on the Internet!
    2. 2. Instructional Goal <ul><li>Each participant will be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>Identify the need for Internet safety </li></ul><ul><li>List and locate NetSmartz resources </li></ul><ul><li>Explore options for implementing NetSmartz in the classroom </li></ul>
    3. 3. Why Are We Here Today? <ul><li>In the United States, 45% of children use the Internet. Of these kids: </li></ul><ul><li>25% have been exposed to unwanted pornography. </li></ul><ul><li>20% have received a sexual solicitation. </li></ul><ul><li>3% have received an aggressive sexual solicitation. </li></ul>
    4. 4. More Statistics
    5. 5. Recent Findings
    6. 6. Amy’s Choice
    7. 7. Case Studies <ul><li>National case </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Kacie Rene Woody </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Missouri cases </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Alton Police “Amber” ( Post-Dispatch ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>St. Peters students ( KSDK TV ) </li></ul></ul>
    8. 9. Tracking Teresa
    9. 10. What is NetSmartz? <ul><li>NetSmartz is an interactive, educational safety resource from the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) and Boys & Girls Clubs of America (B&GCA) for teaching children aged 5 to 17 how to stay safer on the Internet. </li></ul>
    10. 11. The Purpose of NetSmartz <ul><li>The purpose of NetSmartz is to increase the safety awareness of children in order to prevent victimization and increase self-confidence whenever they go online. NetSmartz teaches the following rules for online safety. </li></ul>
    11. 12. Goals of NetSmartz <ul><li>The goals of the NetSmartz Internet safety program are to: </li></ul><ul><li>Enhance the ability of children to recognize dangers on the Internet </li></ul><ul><li>Enhance the ability of children to understand that people they first “meet” on the Internet should never be considered their friends </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage children to report victimization to a trusted adult </li></ul><ul><li>Support and enhance community education efforts </li></ul><ul><li>Increase communication between adults and children about online safety </li></ul>
    12. 13. Results <ul><li>A recent research project into youth awareness of Internet safety and online behavior by Branch Associates determined that an Internet safety educational program is essential in helping to keep children safer on the Internet. NetSmartz provides that program! </li></ul>
    13. 15. What is Included? <ul><li>Three overlapping programs designed for grades K-12 </li></ul><ul><li>Clicky’s Web World </li></ul><ul><ul><li>designed for children K-2 nd grade </li></ul></ul><ul><li>NetSmartz Rules </li></ul><ul><ul><li>designed for primarily for 3 rd -6 th grade </li></ul></ul><ul><li>I360 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Designed for teens </li></ul></ul>
    14. 16. Workshop Resources <ul><li>Activities </li></ul><ul><li>Activity cards </li></ul><ul><li>Internet safety certificates </li></ul><ul><li>Web licenses </li></ul><ul><li>Internet safety pledges </li></ul><ul><li>Games </li></ul><ul><li>Adventure games </li></ul>
    15. 17. Activities <ul><li>Activities are interactive exercises that teach specific lessons about Internet safety. </li></ul>
    16. 18. Activity Cards <ul><li>Activity cards are designed to help incorporate the NetSmartz online activities into teaching. These cards were created by teachers for teachers. They coordinate a classroom or lab activity with an online activity and provide ideas for discussion. </li></ul>
    17. 19. Activity for Grades K-2 <ul><li>“ THE WEB CONNECTION” in Clicky’s Web World </li></ul>
    18. 20. Activity for Grades 3-4 <ul><li>“ MEET THE WIZZYWIGS” in NetSmartz Rules </li></ul>
    19. 21. Activity for Grades 5-6 <ul><li>“ WHO’S YOUR FRIEND ON THE INTERNET?” in NetSmartz Rules! </li></ul>
    20. 22. Activity for Middle School <ul><li>“ Angela’s Experience” & “Keisha’s Crime” on I-360 </li></ul>
    21. 23. NS Teens
    22. 24. Activities for High School <ul><li>“ Teen PSA: “Promises” on I-360 </li></ul>
    23. 25. Internet Safety Certificates <ul><li>Internet Safety Certificates are downloadable certificates to be awarded upon completion of the corresponding program. </li></ul>
    24. 26. Web Licenses <ul><li>A license to be issued to those who complete the corresponding program, granting Internet privileges. </li></ul>
    25. 27. Internet Safety Pledges <ul><li>Pledge to be signed by student and teacher/parent acknowledging the Internet safety policy as set forth by NetSmartz. </li></ul>
    26. 28. Games <ul><li>Games provided in NetSmartz workshop are strictly for fun. They teach no direct lesson, but incorporate concepts of Internet safety, using the NetSmartz characters, and make NetSmartz fun for kids. </li></ul>
    27. 29. Adventure Games <ul><li>Derek in Distress </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Find clues to stop Derek from meeting in person with someone he met online. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(Grades 4-6) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Clicky’s Adventure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Help Clicky round up all of the Web Outlaws who are on the loose. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(Grades 1-3) </li></ul></ul>
    28. 30. Where is NetSmartz Available? <ul><li>NetSmartz website </li></ul><ul><ul><li>www.netsmartz.org </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NetSmartz State Intranet </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.netsmartz.org/education/mo </li></ul></ul>
    29. 31. NetSmartz Website <ul><li>http://www.netsmartz.org </li></ul>
    30. 32. State Intranet
    31. 33. Individual Activities <ul><li>Students can complete the computer activities at their own pace through an independent learning program on computers in the classroom, library or computer lab. </li></ul><ul><li>Clicky’s Web World </li></ul><ul><li>NetSmartz Rules </li></ul><ul><li>I-360 </li></ul>
    32. 34. Group and Individual <ul><li>Finally teachers can encourage students to complete the computer activities on their own and supplement the independent learning with group Internet safety activities taught from NetSmartz activity cards. </li></ul>
    33. 35. Promotional Pamphlets
    34. 36. BeSafe Internet Safety <ul><li>http://besafe.more.net </li></ul>
    35. 37. Educating Adults <ul><li>LOL MUSM POS </li></ul><ul><li>WTGP KOTC </li></ul><ul><li>FOMCL YBS </li></ul><ul><li>TAW LMIRL IHA </li></ul>
    36. 38. FAQs <ul><li>General FAQs </li></ul><ul><li>Parents & Educators site FAQs </li></ul><ul><li>Technology FAQs </li></ul>
    37. 41. Resources
    38. 42. MOREnet Training Courses/Registration/Costs www.more.net/training Contact Phone: (800) 509-6673 or (573) 884-7200 E-mail: [email_address]

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